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Old 10-13-2016, 05:10 PM   #11
Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post
i mounted my waste tank outside the frame rail for ease of use. the drains were also outside the rails so it made it easy to plumb.

instead of hanging them from the bus floor, i think i'd use the frame. my waste tank, battery box, sewer pipe holder and my transmission cooler are all things that i added that hang from the frame.

the frame is real easy to build off of with some L brackets. just drill holes that correspond to the existing holes on the frame.

i've seen other tanks on here that were suspended from the floor like you described, so that works too.

50# X 8 is only 400lbs


good luck
Things go wrong. Someone forgot to dump but filled with water. Just a little downhill grade a slick spot and the pendulum effect. Just to keep in mind the safety of things.
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Old 10-13-2016, 05:48 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -cycosis- View Post
I would love it if you had some pics of your setup? This is where I am most confused about my project...
Sorry, no photos! I'm photographically challenged (and that's being kind).

Even though I thought that my tanks' installation was a difficult project, looking back on it now it actually was quite simple, at least compared with some other things I've done. You first have to find space for the tanks you have, or buy tanks for the space you have. I suggest having the most possible water capacity - just because you have X gallons of tanks doesn't mean you have to have them 100% full all the time, but there may be occasions when having lots of water is good. Make sure the tanks cannot move at all in any of the six possible directions of movement (up, down, left, right, forward, aft) - this means positive location by using something solid and strong to keep them in place. As I mentioned, you can control their horizontal movement by cradling their tops within a surround frame under the floor, then as long as they are held tight up against the floor they cannot move at all. It's simpler and better to do it this way instead of making diagonal or cantilevered bracing against their bottoms.

You can drill holes through the frame rails' lower flanges, but you have to drill them along the flanges' center line where the stresses are neutral. The tanks should be supported underneath all around their periphery, and underneath every foot or two to prevent them bulgeing when full. Polyethylene tanks should be protected from debris by being sheathed in plywood. If you have roto-molded tanks, it's worth having all their fittings spin-welded in, and use the thickest heaviest-duty fittings available to lessen them stretching as you tighten pipe fittings into them.

Fresh water tanks need vents to equalize pressure inside as they fill or are drained - a 1/2" line should be plenty. Black and grey tanks however need much more venting. You need to allow fresh air in to let the aerobic bacteria do their thing, you need to let any methane harmlessly out, and you need to let lots of air back in when dumping their contents. Most folk use a single 2" or 3" vent up through the roof. I did something different. Each of my waste tanks has two 2" vents in diagonally opposite corners of their tops - the black tank's rear vent goes up through the floor and behind the closet, and exits through a louvered marine hose vent high up on the bus's side just under the roof gutter, with the louvers pointing forward. The black and grey tanks' front vents are interconnected, and the grey tank's rear vent goes down to ground level and points back with a large opening just ahead of the differential. When I'm driving, air is forced into the black tank through the forward-facing upper louver vent, flows through the black tank and into the grey tank, and is pulled out through the grey rear vent by venturi effect as air rushes under the bus. This way I have positive airflow through both tanks while driving, and any smells are exhausted at ground level so they cannot be sucked back inside. When parked, natural convection causes cooler air to enter through the ground-level grey vent, through both tanks (the opposite direction than when driving), and up through the black's upper vent, aided by that vent pipe being next to a panel that gets warm in the sun so the air in it heats up and wants to rise, pulling the air in the tanks behind it. It sounds more complicated than it is, but it seems to work just fine.

And you thought tanks were simple!

John
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Old 10-13-2016, 06:06 PM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Calgary
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Year: 2000
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: 5.9L Cummins


I have a pretty good understanding of how to build the supports for tanks, but its attaching everything to the underside of the bus where I am lost. IE: the blue circle. Lets assume the red is plywood, the green is all thread.

You guys keep saying drill into the underside of the bus but how are you attaching the all thread to the holes you made?
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Old 10-13-2016, 06:44 PM   #14
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Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
Sorry, my computer doesn't show your picture.

If you're drilling through frame rails lower flanges, then a pair of nuts (jammed together as tight as possible) and a washer on the top will support vertical loads. Another nut and washer underneath the frame rail is good to keep everything tight. Repeat the process but the opposite way under the tank's lower supports. Easy! Just don't overtighten the nuts, or you may cause the tanks to push the floor up - I inadvertently did that, then wondered why my floor was no longer flat inside. Doh! And don't attach anything to only wood or plywood - the threaded rod must be secured through structural steel. Wood should never be used for any critical or load-bearing applications.

When I was doing my tanks, I visualized someone picking up my bus and violently shaking it in all directions. Would anything become loose or fall apart if that happened? That was my design parameter. Not too much advanced math involved, but like how Victorian engineers made things it should last for ever - Forth Bridge, anyone?
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Old 10-13-2016, 07:03 PM   #15
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Hmmm I think that would be fairly easy if all my floor joists were L shaped. Mine have no lip so i have no access to put the nuts/washer on top of the all-thread. They are all square tube.
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Old 10-13-2016, 08:04 PM   #16
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Research eye sockets for the size of rod you would like to use and also uni-strut.
Erico is a cheap place to start and Hilti engineered Uni-strut systems will give you an idea of what is possible.
Check them out?
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Old 10-13-2016, 08:41 PM   #17
Bus Nut
 
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That would clarify a few things... I think I have the general idea but a photo or two would confirm that I'm on the right track.
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