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Old 07-03-2019, 12:23 AM   #1
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Heater Removal Help.

I Have A 1984 International S1753 And I Want To Remove The Heaters But Dont Know What To Do At All. Can Someone Help?
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:44 AM   #2
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When I took mine out I looped back the radiator hose outflow into the inflow, If that’s what you’re asking?
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Old 07-04-2019, 07:54 PM   #3
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Find the 2 hoses that come front the engine compartment that feeds and returns the coolant. Unhook the return hose and cut and connect the feed line into that return port. Now unscrew the heaters from the floor and remove the hoses and unplug the electric lines. Be prepared to catch about a gallon of anti freeze from the lines.
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:26 AM   #4
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You may want to consider keeping the drivers heater operational as it provides defrost for the windshield.

Defrost is a great function to have......
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Old 07-09-2019, 05:51 PM   #5
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You'll want to get two 5 gallon buckets, then go under the bus on the driver's side just behind the engine (assuming it's a front engine bus) and you'll find the two hoses the same size as the ones running down the inside of your bus. Once you've found the hoses, take a pair of pruning shears and snip both hoses while pointing them into the pails. You'll drain about 5-8 gallons of coolant into the pails when finished. Once the flow stops, go back into your bus and drag the rear heater up to the front of the bus. Lift the hoses until all the coolant is out of the lines. Now you can pull the hose up through the floor and haul it out of your bus for good. Snip off a piece of hose and take it to Lowe's or Home Depot and ask for a "barbed" connecting piece and two clamps to connect the two hose ends under the bus and your done. Replace your coolant as required.

Don't cut the lines up in the bus whatever you do! This is the WRONG WAY! Cut the lines UNDER the bus as I've said. It's really a piece of cake I promise.

Good luck to you.

Dennis
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Old 07-09-2019, 07:54 PM   #6
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You'll drain about 5-8 gallons of coolant into the pails when finished.
When I deleted my mid and rear heaters, I first disconnected both of them from the floor and moved them forward so I could get a bunch of slack in the hoses behind the driver's seat. I then raised each hose behind the seat and tied it to the ceiling with two ropes and hose clamps, then cut the hoses (https://i.imgur.com/ixakd39.jpg) and spliced the lines to and from the engine together with a brass coupling.

I don't really understand why not (hopefully someone can explain it here), but I lost almost no coolant at all in the process. I had three or four 4-gallon buckets ready to go, but when I cut the hoses I lost nothing but a few drops, and then when I drained what was left in the cut hoses and the heaters, it wasn't even a half-inch in the bottom of one bucket.
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Old 07-09-2019, 07:56 PM   #7
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Snip off a piece of hose and take it to Lowe's or Home Depot and ask for a "barbed" connecting piece and two clamps to connect the two hose ends under the bus and your done.
My bus' hose was 1" and I couldn't find a coupling that size anywhere - Home Depot, Lowes or any of the auto parts stores around me. Had to order one online.
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Old 07-09-2019, 08:29 PM   #8
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My bus' hose was 1" and I couldn't find a coupling that size anywhere - Home Depot, Lowes or any of the auto parts stores around me. Had to order one online.
Mine was quite easy. Where the 2 hoses meet at the motor, there is a fixture. I loosened the clamp on the fixture and loosened the hose. Then I cut the other hose, pulled the loose off and connected the cut hose to the fixture.
If you are not usinf the old heaters, cut off a 2-3" end for a pipe coupling.
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Old 07-10-2019, 06:47 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
When I deleted my mid and rear heaters, I first disconnected both of them from the floor and moved them forward so I could get a bunch of slack in the hoses behind the driver's seat. I then raised each hose behind the seat and tied it to the ceiling with two ropes and hose clamps, then cut the hoses (https://i.imgur.com/ixakd39.jpg) and spliced the lines to and from the engine together with a brass coupling.

I don't really understand why not (hopefully someone can explain it here), but I lost almost no coolant at all in the process. I had three or four 4-gallon buckets ready to go, but when I cut the hoses I lost nothing but a few drops, and then when I drained what was left in the cut hoses and the heaters, it wasn't even a half-inch in the bottom of one bucket.
Clever use of gravity. I did something similar'ish.
My rear heaters were removed by the previous owner, along with a supremely butchered electrical dismantling.......
I unfastened the drivers heater from the floor and rotated it out towards the transmission access hatch, where I had my large/deep drip tray, and then I disconnected the hoses from the fittings on the heater. I caught between a 1/4 & 1/2 Gal, then I covered the hoses and threaded them through the steering wheel till I was ready to reconnect the heater. I didn't hack the hoses as getting replacements was sure to be a PITA, since most HE uses 1.5" or larger and I live in the middle of nowhere.

side note, if you can't find 1" barb a threaded 3/4" brass nipple will work as a substitute. I have 2 of them in my system and thus far they are holding.
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