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Old 10-11-2016, 08:48 PM   #11
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After removing one of the high capacity solenoids, I studied the entire thing over to be sure about any markings that may be on the outer body. The only markings on the whole thing are as follows,

"BAT" next to the terminal that is connected to the battery or 12V constant

"12V" stamped on the bottom, pretty straightforward

a lone numeral "7" stamped into the bottom with an engraving die

the number "8921" stamped onto the bottom with ink

No other markings appear on the solenoid(s) whatsoever. The solenoids have a metal bracket spot welded to the body with no rubber shielding leading me to believe that this is the "unshielded" type therefore making the body grounded.
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Old 10-12-2016, 06:43 AM   #12
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A way to test the lead to and from three key is to use a 12 volt bulb with long leads so you can see it.

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Old 10-12-2016, 08:31 AM   #13
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If the relays were added by the body manufacturer, I doubt if they use intermittent duty solenoids. If the loads are the same you can replace an intermittent with a continuous, not the other way around.

Quote:
I want to replace all the solenoids and circuit breakers in the panel as well as the engine bay as there are a few more in there.
I question why you feel the need to replace all of your solenoids? They rarely go bad. At most I might carry a spare or two. Circuit breakers don't wear out and for that matter are rarely even tripped. In 50 or so years of working on all types of vehicles, about half of that for a living doing electrical troubleshooting, I have seen very few solenoid failures, most of those were the old Ford fender mounted starter ones that carried a heavy load. I think one maybe two bad circuit breakers in all of that time.

If your bus came with a lift of some sort, there are all kinds of switches and relays so that the bus can not be started unless that lift is fully retracted. Many also have switches so that the lift can not be deployed unless things aren't "Just so". Many had to even have the parking brake engaged.

When trouble shooting a no start, get down to just the basics needed to run, per the chassis manufacturer wiring diagram, in your case an '89 E350. If you aren't going to use all of that other stuff just eliminate it.

Dick
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:43 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tootalltechie View Post
A way to test the lead to and from three key is to use a 12 volt bulb with long leads so you can see it.

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk
Great tip, I'm going to try this.
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Old 10-12-2016, 01:59 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by somewhereinusa View Post
If the relays were added by the body manufacturer, I doubt if they use intermittent duty solenoids. If the loads are the same you can replace an intermittent with a continuous, not the other way around.

I question why you feel the need to replace all of your solenoids? They rarely go bad. At most I might carry a spare or two. Circuit breakers don't wear out and for that matter are rarely even tripped. In 50 or so years of working on all types of vehicles, about half of that for a living doing electrical troubleshooting, I have seen very few solenoid failures, most of those were the old Ford fender mounted starter ones that carried a heavy load. I think one maybe two bad circuit breakers in all of that time.

If your bus came with a lift of some sort, there are all kinds of switches and relays so that the bus can not be started unless that lift is fully retracted. Many also have switches so that the lift can not be deployed unless things aren't "Just so". Many had to even have the parking brake engaged.

When trouble shooting a no start, get down to just the basics needed to run, per the chassis manufacturer wiring diagram, in your case an '89 E350. If you aren't going to use all of that other stuff just eliminate it.

Dick
I also believe that the coach company would not have used the intermittent type. Fortunately I found a decent place to get the solenoids, at $15 a piece times four it isn't so bad of an investment into peace of mind. I do not doubt you when you say that these components rarely fail. However, I do not have the experience that you do and so it is my intention to cross off all the potential causes of the issue. Getting back to basics on this vehicle would mean un-modifying the coach builders modifications; which would be moving in the opposite direction that I intend to go. The key start electrical signal is clearly being rerouted instead of going straight to the ignition relay as it originally did; since the click sound originates from the solenoid panel. The bus does not have a lift, so that is ruled out of the equation. I think the member who mentioned a faulty neutral start switch may have been onto something. Those things are cheap, and I'm more inclined to replace small inexpensive items before I inevitably move onto unwrapping and retracing the wiring harness for breaks. Another huge issue is that I do not have a clue what solenoid or circuit breaker pertains to what system...this is why I am replacing them all, because I don't know what I want to delete from this bus yet, if anything at all.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:13 PM   #16
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Working without assistance, you could put the ignition key in the run position, turn off unnecessary things like blowers, headlights, etc, and then walk around and jumper from +12 onto the control terminal on that starter solenoid.

Running with the belief that the starter solenoid control input isn't getting powered, you could pick up an inexpensive wire tracer tool and trace back from the starter end of the control wire to see where it goes. A cheap wire tracer goes for US$25 on Amazon; use is as simple as hooking up alligator clips from the tone generator box to your subject wire, then waving the non-contact probe over insulated wires, terminals, etc to figure out whether they're electrically connected to the point where the tone box is attached. This would allow you to trace the wiring harness with a minimum of disassembly.
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