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Old 07-27-2019, 10:55 AM   #1
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Ideas on how to patch a 1/4" hole in window frame track?

My bus windows came with plastic stops riveted into the tracks of the upper window that prevent them from being lowered more than 4" or so. I removed one of my windows and I drilled out the rivets for these stops, so now the top window can open fully but I have two 1/4" holes in the track that I need to patch (watertight unless I'm misunderstanding window drainage):

IMG_0282.jpeg

IMG_0283.jpeg

IMG_0284.jpeg

IMG_0285.jpeg

I was going to glue 1/2"x1" pieces of plexiglass over the holes on the inside track, but I'm worried that won't give sufficient window clearance since the plastic stops were not much thicker than that to begin with, and if I glue them to the outside I still have to deal with sealing the rim of the hole on the inside (which is the part exposed to rain).

Cut a little aluminum disk and JB weld it in place? Probably too much effort to get the disks. I'm thinking maybe hold my finger over the hole on the inside and put a dab of seam sealer on the other and kind of smear it on both sides. Won't look great but this is a pretty invisible spot. I'm more worried about how long that would last, but it's always something I could touch up from the outside.

Edit: fark, I forgot to convert these images to PNG before posting. Sorry about the orientation problem, it's all JPEG's fault.
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Old 07-27-2019, 11:52 AM   #2
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The first thing I'm curious about, is if there was evidence of water trickling down from the rivits.
Next, how far into the frame's exterior (away from the window) did the rivet head protrude?
Presuming they were in the top sash's track, to prevent fully opening, and that it slides down behind the fixed glass. (A properly oriented, " Before," shot'd help with these dumb statements)
Al disks'd be simple enough to make with a pair of scissors and an empty pop or beer can's side, then JB'ed in place. Tho square or rectangular pieces would be much easier, and with their larger area give a better fix, IMO.
The other solution would be to lay a piece of mesh over the hole from the outer side, & bondo it in, with a little smooshed smooth to fill flush on the track's side, if cosmetics are a concern.
Given that it won't be touched after the reinstall, you could simply lay on a strip of Gorilla Tape cut to the channel's width, and black magic marker the tiny bit of the sticky side showing...
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:17 PM   #3
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JB Weld or similar branded product that comes in a tootsie roll shape.
Cut a small piece off, knurl in between fingers to activate built in hardener, and stuff it in the hole.
Wipe off excess on outside and inside with your finger or a rag. Done.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:23 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by peteg59 View Post
JB Weld or similar branded product that comes in a tootsie roll shape.
Cut a small piece off, knurl in between fingers to activate built in hardener, and stuff it in the hole.
Wipe off excess on outside and inside with your finger or a rag. Done.
Is this the stuff you're talking about? https://www.jbweld.com/collections/e...ducts/autoweld

This sounds most promising. That's kind of what I was going to do with a bit of Dynatron-500 but what you're talking about sounds like it would work better.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:29 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by HazMatt View Post
The first thing I'm curious about, is if there was evidence of water trickling down from the rivits.
Next, how far into the frame's exterior (away from the window) did the rivet head protrude?
Presuming they were in the top sash's track, to prevent fully opening, and that it slides down behind the fixed glass. (A properly oriented, " Before," shot'd help with these dumb statements)
Al disks'd be simple enough to make with a pair of scissors and an empty pop or beer can's side, then JB'ed in place. Tho square or rectangular pieces would be much easier, and with their larger area give a better fix, IMO.
The other solution would be to lay a piece of mesh over the hole from the outer side, & bondo it in, with a little smooshed smooth to fill flush on the track's side, if cosmetics are a concern.
Given that it won't be touched after the reinstall, you could simply lay on a strip of Gorilla Tape cut to the channel's width, and black magic marker the tiny bit of the sticky side showing...
Sorry, I should have taken before pics, but both windows I have at home now I've already drilled out the rivets.

The rivets holding these plastic stops in are rusty on their surface in all the windows, but there's no sign of any water leaking through the stops.

I dunno about Gorilla Tape - that seems a bit too improvised for me. I like the aluminum can idea, or maybe even a bit of an aluminum cooking tray so the piece is flat.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:33 PM   #6
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I don't always save the best for last! (Tho I'd betcha it'd work for a down n dirty fix. That stuff is fantastically strong!)
The cans are thinner & easier to cut, and a mallet will quickly flatten the marginal curvature.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:37 PM   #7
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I don't always save the best for last! (Tho I'd betcha it'd work for a down n dirty fix. That stuff is fantastically strong!)
The cans are thinner & easier to cut, and a mallet will quickly flatten the marginal curvature.
I meant like the cheapie one-use trays they serve to go food in etc. That's probably too thin, though, although I'll confess I thought about using aluminum foil for a second.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:45 PM   #8
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Buy a Stouffers lasagne, and you'll have plenty of a thicker gauge to work with! Their Lasagne Italiano is actually quite tasty, especially if you like fresh basil, tho their chicken lasagne will do in a pinch...
Triple folding aluminum foil would prolly do it, I'd be worried it might eventually serve as an aquaduct.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:46 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by peteg59 View Post
JB Weld or similar branded product that comes in a tootsie roll shape.
Cut a small piece off, knurl in between fingers to activate built in hardener, and stuff it in the hole.
Wipe off excess on outside and inside with your finger or a rag. Done.
Just ordered this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RN7CT2U

Which gives me the rest of the day off! Thank you, this stuff seems like exactly what I need.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:49 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
Is this the stuff you're talking about? https://www.jbweld.com/collections/e...ducts/autoweld

This sounds most promising. That's kind of what I was going to do with a bit of Dynatron-500 but what you're talking about sounds like it would work better.
Yes that is it. It is sand able and paintable once cured, if you want to pretty it up.
I was looking for a link to post for the stuff, but you beat me to it!
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