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Old 09-17-2015, 09:42 PM   #1
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installing wood stove

Hello! We are going to use a two dog tent stove in our bus. I had a friend do this and he said it worked great. We are going to put the chimney through the roof (as i have heard that is safer,less chance of creosote fire).

Has anyone else done this? Your thoughts? What did you use for your stove\chimney pipe?
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Old 09-17-2015, 10:19 PM   #2
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Yes, many of us have installed wood stoves in our buses.

You need to go read as many build threads as you can. That is where the real info and experience is.

Without knowing anything about how you converted your bus, it's hard to give advice. If your bus is anything more than a steel tent, please read the following.

You will need a two or three foot piece of insulated pipe like used to pass through the ceiling in a house installation. These pipes are expensive. I payed over $200 for mine, but it is stainless steel inside and out. You will also need the hanger kit for it. The hanger kit also finishes off the cut opening in the ceiling.

Pic of the pipe. This is Super vent, sold by Lows


Then you will need a silicone rubber roof flashing to seal up the outside.

Like this one. Just be sure it's made for wood stoves, not plumbing.


Nat
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:58 AM   #3
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Honestly talk to a wood stove dealer in your area. When I worked at a place where we sold them there was all kinds of information available. If you don't have kids un insulated stove pipes are an excellent way to get more heat out of the stove but WILL get hot enough that skin will stick to it. You want to make sure you have at least the recommended draft height of flue pipe or the stove won't work properly, this doesn't mean you will die or bad things will happen it means that you might not get a catalytic burn or gunned up pipes. make sure you follow minimum clearances and have a fire proof hearth. If you plan on using it in national forests have a forest service approved spark arrestor.
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Old 09-18-2015, 02:28 AM   #4
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For the record, I use seamless non insulated pipe to 6 inches from the ceiling, then the seamless pipe connects to the insulated pipe where it passes through the ceiling.

But again, this all depends on your interior wall and ceiling finishes, Insulation used, type of stove, ect.

My shed has nothing more than a regular, single wall pipe with a seam, cut through a hole in the ceiling of the bus shell. I kept the fiberglass insulation back 6 inches, and cut a hole through the roofing tin on the top layer of the shed.
I never even installed a flashing. It leaks water, but not much.
However the water leaking does rust the stove. I might install the rubber boot this year, almost 5 years after building it.

A few pics from my "Haul All" thread.









Nat
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Old 09-09-2016, 10:07 AM   #5
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I will be getting my ceiling spray foamed and have tongue and groove ceiling to finish. I have double wall black pipe and need to figure out how to get through the ceiling. Is the triple wall insulated enough to just go straight through and insulate up to that? If I leave space or use one of the metal thimbles will I end up with condensation in the summer when running AC? I was thinking of trying to do some sort of thimble or air box around it where it goes through the roof and cut some insulation to cover it in the summer? I may be over thinking again
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Old 09-09-2016, 01:57 PM   #6
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I day dream about firing up the wood stove this winter. The fantasy is delightful even in the heat of summer.

I have it in place but not installed, going to wait until it cools to get a better feel, closer look, and motivation to finish it in.

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Old 09-09-2016, 03:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricW View Post
I will be getting my ceiling spray foamed and have tongue and groove ceiling to finish. I have double wall black pipe and need to figure out how to get through the ceiling. Is the triple wall insulated enough to just go straight through and insulate up to that? If I leave space or use one of the metal thimbles will I end up with condensation in the summer when running AC? I was thinking of trying to do some sort of thimble or air box around it where it goes through the roof and cut some insulation to cover it in the summer? I may be over thinking again
The only safe way to run a solid fuel chimney through a wall or roof penetration is going to be similar to what Nat described above. To meet pipe manufacturer's spec, though, you need to support the chimney structure at the roof or wall penetration with a part made by the chimney pipe manufacturer for that purpose. I'll post specifics separately.

People manage to burn their homes down due to inadequate clearances despite all the room they have for proper installations. In vehicles, we are dealing with much tighter spaces than in homes. Here are some general rules:

1) Use only double wall connector pipe between the stove and the roof jack. (Double wall connector requires only 6" clearance to combustibles, while single wall requires 12" to 18" depending on heat shielding.)

If you're using a modern EPA approved stove (and you should be, for the higher efficiency, cleaner burning, cleaner/safer chimneys and the reduced pollutants in the air right outside your door!) then it is often counterproductive to use a single wall pipe anyway. You need some heat in the exhaust just to maintain a good draft and a clean chimney. These certified stoves are efficient enough that you're not losing anything with double wall pipe.

2) Use Class A packed pipe for all roof or wall penetrations, and for any portion of the chimney that is outside the vehicle. Class A pipe requires 2" clearance to combustibles.

3) A metal wall/roof panel - or heat shield - is not considered non-combustible if there is a combustible material (like insulation) behind it. You still need to measure all the way TO the combustible material for proper clearance.

4) The old saw that "heat rises" only applies to convection. Radiant heat moves in every direction including sideways and straight down until it hits something. Be sure that what it hits either meets the non-combustibility test in #3 or, if not, that it is far enough away to be safe according to the stove manufacturer's tested clearances.

One of the better sources of installation information for skoolies is Marine stove manufacturers. They do beautiful and safe installations in tight spaces all the time. They make some nice stoves, too!
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Old 09-09-2016, 03:58 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by EricW View Post
I will be getting my ceiling spray foamed and have tongue and groove ceiling to finish. I have double wall black pipe and need to figure out how to get through the ceiling.
I'm doing something similar. I just bought the ceiling support box from the pipe manufacturer and am using that.

Ceiling support boxes solve a lot of problems. They anchor in the ceiling structure, then in turn are used to anchor your connector pipe and your Class A chimney pipe. They'll give you plenty of strength, the clearances you need and give the installation a nice finished look.

Make sure all the chimney parts are from the same manufacturer and are the same type. Also, the support box should be installed before you spray the foam insulation.
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Old 09-09-2016, 10:29 PM   #9
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Thanks for the help. I am going to try to find a place I can get some double wall pipe, a section of triple wall insulated to go through a ceiling box and maybe an extra extension to go past the smaller section going through the roof. I would think I'd only need a 2 foot section of triple insulated to make it through the ceiling and box? I called the local wood stove place and the guy seemed less than educated on any abnormal application so I'm not sure I'm going to go there but home depot seems to carry some triple wall pipe so I may go there after work tomorrow. Now with the box... would you cut a square in your ceiling to mount the box? How would one attach? I could see the box having a lip or something so it could be drilled and siliconed but would doubtfully fit the curve of a bus roof and having the rubber boot as shown above would have to fit over and around the box?

Edit: after looking at a wide variety it dawned on me that the box is likely only on the inside of the bus and the top of the "box" is created by the roof of the bus. The hole would still be cut to fit the pipe, siliconed, and a high temp grade rubber boot could complete it? Now to track down this box I'm seeing on everyone's conversions
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Old 09-09-2016, 10:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricW View Post
Thanks for the help. I am going to try to find a place I can get some double wall pipe, a section of triple wall insulated to go through a ceiling box and maybe an extra extension to go past the smaller section going through the roof. I would think I'd only need a 2 foot section of triple insulated to make it through the ceiling and box? I called the local wood stove place and the guy seemed less than educated on any abnormal application so I'm not sure I'm going to go there but home depot seems to carry some triple wall pipe so I may go there after work tomorrow
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