Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-01-2015, 10:34 AM   #21
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
I have imagination.
I just don't imagine that I'd want to spray foam the exterior of a bus.
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2015, 01:56 PM   #22
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 4
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas
I'm using an insulating paint additive to paint the interior and exterior of the bus and then also insulating inside with sheeps wool. You should look into the additive, the one I used is called HY-tech and it seems pretty awesome. Lots of info on how it works on their website.

I'd imagine you could insulate from the exterior but it would be a lot of extra work for those few inches. The roof and the floor are the areas in need of the most insulation and if you're going through all that trouble you may want to consider a roof raise.
missybird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2015, 02:59 PM   #23
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Oregon
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by missybird View Post
I'm using an insulating paint additive to paint the interior and exterior of the bus and then also insulating inside with sheeps wool. You should look into the additive, the one I used is called HY-tech and it seems pretty awesome. Lots of info on how it works on their website.

I'd imagine you could insulate from the exterior but it would be a lot of extra work for those few inches. The roof and the floor are the areas in need of the most insulation and if you're going through all that trouble you may want to consider a roof raise.
I looked up HY-tech and it does look cool. How well does it insulate?
__________________
"Courage is not the absence of fear. Many couragious people have been terrified out of their wits. They are just tired and can't take anymore" Cptn. 'Hawkeye' Pierce.
Veganvegabond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2015, 05:35 PM   #24
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,962
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
Missybird, just a word of caution. I cut and pasted the following from an earlier discussion.
Before you use hemp or any other "natural' fiber to insulate with be sure to read up on what the mfg has done to test the product for what you want to use it for. While it may have been tested for residential use I'd bet it hasn't been tested in the skoolie environment. Remember, all of our buses leak water or at least suffer from condensation. Wet hemp (as well as other natural fibers like lambs wool insulation) will support a fine growth of mold and fungus after they get moist. Also loose fibers will eventually settle and loose their insulating properties. Fibers to achieve their insulating properties need trapped air spaces. If you stuff fibers into spaces to "plug" them up, you will gain no insulating properties. Google "how thermal insulation works" and in a few minutes you will be a near expert--lots of good stuff there. Hope this helps. Jack
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2015, 06:41 PM   #25
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
I have imagination.
I just don't imagine that I'd want to spray foam the exterior of a bus.
I agree, that's why I did the roof raise.



Great info on the use of natural fibers as insulation.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2015, 06:48 PM   #26
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Id go with unnatural fibers first. Anything thats mold and moisture resistant.
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2015, 12:17 PM   #27
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Id go with unnatural fibers first. Anything thats mold and moisture resistant.

X 2

Some here will remember that for that reason, I don't even like using wood. My body can't do mold of any amount. A few short minutes, and my lungs start to fill up with fluid.

I have no other breathing trouble.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2015, 10:27 PM   #28
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 4
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas
Thanks for the concern Jack.

I based my decision for sheep wool on lots of research and it fit my needs perfectly. The company I bought from is called Oregon Shepard and has great resources to help you compare products.
First, wool is naturally fire and vermin resistant; the fibers actually snuff out flames and you don't need to worry about any mice making nests in your walls, ceilings, or floors. Second, the wool also naturally resists mold and mildew growth. Wool can soak up as much as 30% of its own weight in moisture without feeling wet; think of how a sheep stays warm in the rain. Third, wool is nontoxic and safe for you and the environment. You don't need any extra clothing or safety precautions. Fourth, wool is 100% recyclable and self sustaining. Fifth, wool is acoustically superior and is the most effective as a sound control material. Sixth, wool does not break down in terms of fire resistance, moisture absorption, mold growth, corrosive action or degradation. This stuff will last a long time, performing at its best. Seventh, natural wool (at least Oregon Shepard's wool) does NOT settle over time, it actually expands over time. This results in improved long-term thermal effectiveness by as much as 20%. And most importantly, sheep wool actually has a higher R value then traditional forms of insulation. Sheep wool is a natural insulator because it has a crimped nature which traps air in millions of tiny pockets. It has an R value of 3.5 to 3.8 per inch of material, .3 to .6 points higher than fiberglass, cellulose, or mineral wool.

If you're looking for insulation, look into using natural sheep wool. Its pretty cool. Hope that helps.
missybird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2015, 07:05 AM   #29
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: southwest lowsyana
Posts: 542
Year: 1988
Coachwork: ward
Chassis: international
Engine: dt360a
Rated Cap: 65
wool may be all that, but what about the stuff it traps? think sawdust, pollens, etc. add the moisture that the wool holds and ya get mold.
claydbal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2015, 07:33 AM   #30
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,170
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
From the department of energy-
For use as insulation, sheep's wool is also treated with borate to resist pests, fire, and mold. It can hold large quantities of water, which is an advantage for use in some walls, but repeated wetting and drying can leach out the borate. The thermal resistance or R-value of sheep's wool batts is about R-3.5 per inch, similar to other fibrous insulation types.

I don't see anyone touting the stuff except the guys selling it.
Seems to appeal to green types, but I doubt its going to last very long in a bus environment.

http://energy.gov/energysaver/articl...tion-materials
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Exterior PA? Skip Conversion General Discussions 7 12-29-2013 08:24 AM
Pre-Hung Exterior Door zim Conversion Tutorials and How-to's 0 02-01-2011 07:37 PM
EXTERIOR LP FOR GRILL? BUSBOZO Conversion General Discussions 6 10-03-2010 07:51 PM
Exterior 120V outlet... jkindt Conversion General Discussions 8 06-23-2010 10:59 AM
Installing an Exterior Ladder soused moose Conversion General Discussions 3 08-25-2004 11:17 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.