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Old 05-16-2015, 06:02 PM   #1
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jacks, worth it?

the front brakes are squealing and i have no way to pull a tire. is it worth the investment in a jack, and some 3/4" pneumatic tools?

if its just one time thing to fix... maybe better off at the mechanics? anyone done brakes on their bus yet?

turf
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:57 PM   #2
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Depending on your wheel type, you may need to get 1 inch drive tools, or a torque multiplier ( here is a cheap one, I have not used this one Outsunny Heavy Duty Torque Multiplier Socket Lugnut Remover Wrench w/ Case)
I believe the Budd wheels you will not budge them with a 3/4 impact

you may get the daytons with a 3/4.

with a torque multiplier you will turn the handle the oposite direction you want the nut to turn.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:20 PM   #3
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It all sort of depends.

If you have Dayton spoke wheels you can do all of the work with hand tools. You may need a cheater but it can be done.

If you have Budd wheels a torque multiplier works great with hand tools.

At the end of the day you need to decide what you know you can do and what you think you might be able to do and what you shouldn't do.

I have gotten to the point that on the big stuff I prefer to hire it done. Not only does it get done right but if there are problems you can go back and have it done right.

One can very easily invest in a lot of very expensive heavy duty tools that rarely, if ever, get used. Even when purchasing from Harbor Freight a large enough air compressor, air lines, fittings, jacks, wheel stands, and tools can cost upwards of $1,000.00.

You also need to consider the weight of what you will be handling. A mounted bus tire and wheel is more than 300 pounds, a brake drum can weigh more than 100 pounds.

If you don't have a good hard and flat surface that can support the weight of the bus any ideas of doing it yourself should not be considered.

Understanding your limitations need to be seriously considered.

Good luck and be safe!
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:40 PM   #4
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I don't think that air tools are recessary. You aren't supposed to use impact wrenches to install tires any way (or so I was told). I have dayton wheels that only require 200flb of torque. I bought one of the "truck lug wrench" from princess auto, one of thoes X shaped things. The way it's constructed, It gives me around 200flbs of torque when I use all my weight to install my tires. I figure that if I use a 4 ft piece of pipe on it, it gives me 720 flbs of torque to remove my lug nuts.

If you choose to to it my way, before attempting to remove the nuts use the poor mans impact wrench. Gently tap on the studs with a sledge hammer, BUT remember to protect the threads with a block of Alumanum or bronze. This should loosen up the lugs if they are rusted on.

To jack up the bus I have 2 20 ton bottle jacks and some heavy timbers as jack stands.

I don't even pretend to know what I'm doing, there ARE far better ways than how I do things but I do get the job done.
When not using a wrench with a torque measuring device, make sure to calculate the torque you will be be applying before hand. Good and tight, is not good enough.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:17 AM   #5
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thanks for the input.

i am thinking i'll take it to the shop. i've never considered a brake job as too big or worried about changing a tire, but with the bus..... those wheels look heavy. 20 years ago i would have bought the tools and not asked first.

it is just the dayton wheels, not the budd style, but i feel its a job for a younger man. my days of tossing around 300lb wheels are past

thanks for the info... makes the decision much easier.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:04 AM   #6
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:19 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post
thanks for the input.

i am thinking i'll take it to the shop. i've never considered a brake job as too big or worried about changing a tire, but with the bus..... those wheels look heavy. 20 years ago i would have bought the tools and not asked first.

it is just the dayton wheels, not the budd style, but i feel its a job for a younger man. my days of tossing around 300lb wheels are past

thanks for the info... makes the decision much easier.
If you have Dayton wheels I'd advise to give it a shot. As mentioned above, the Dayton wheels can be removed entirely with hand tools (breaker bar), though a 3/4" impact wrench could come in handy. In my opinion, anyone who has them on their rig should learn how to take them off, put them back on and true them up. It's not a difficult process and the wheels aren't overly heavy.

Break the nuts with the tire on the ground. Then jack the axle and with the wheel up and the nuts still on give the wheel clamps a tap (or whack) to make sure they aren't under tension. If you remove the nuts entirely a wheel clamp could come flying at you.

Here's more info on the subject:
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f33/wh...nfo-10659.html








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Old 05-17-2015, 01:21 PM   #8
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i misspoke.

i do not have the dayton/budd style. i have a regular truck tire rim and lugnuts.



cool video, i always wondered how they changed those
thanks
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Old 05-17-2015, 01:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post
i misspoke.

i do not have the dayton/budd style. i have a regular truck tire rim and lugnuts.



cool video, i always wondered how they changed those
thanks
No. You dident mis-speak. "Regular" truck rims with the lugs in the center are budd wheels. You have budd wheels.

Budd wheels are like a cars or a pickups, whereas dayton, are the "spoke" type wheels.
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Old 05-17-2015, 01:59 PM   #10
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thanks
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