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Old 08-30-2015, 02:46 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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live and drive?

So I know it's a silly question but while looking at ,Pinterest a great source of ideas, I realize that a lot of the buses have loose knickknacks. And then I was reading more and it seems that people use buses to just live in them(i know it's pretty obvious) but my question is:
Can you live in them and travel say year round? How much is too much for a bus weight wise? How far have you gone with your bus and do you live in your bus full time?
I know it's a silly question but I would rather ask then assume. Thanks for all the replys in advance.
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Old 08-30-2015, 03:58 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livelovelaugh91897 View Post
So I know it's a silly question but while looking at ,Pinterest a great source of ideas, I realize that a lot of the buses have loose knickknacks. And then I was reading more and it seems that people use buses to just live in them(i know it's pretty obvious) but my question is:
Can you live in them and travel say year round? How much is too much for a bus weight wise? How far have you gone with your bus and do you live in your bus full time?
I know it's a silly question but I would rather ask then assume. Thanks for all the replys in advance.
GVWR from wiki-
Quote:
The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), or gross vehicle mass (GVM) is the maximum operating weight/mass of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer[1] including the vehicle's chassis, body, engine, engine fluids, fuel, accessories, driver, passengers and cargo but excluding that of any trailers.[2] The term is used for motor vehicles and trains.
The weight of a vehicle is influenced by passengers, cargo, even fuel level, so a number of terms are used to express the weight of a vehicle in a designated state. Gross combined weight rating refers to the total mass of a vehicle, including all trailers. GVWR and GCWR both describe a vehicle that is in operation and are used to specify weight limitations and restrictions. Curb weight describes a vehicle which is "parked at the curb" and excludes the weight of any occupants or cargo. Dry weight further excludes the weight of all consumables, such as fuel and oils. Gross trailer weight rating specifies the maximum weight of a trailer and the gross axle weight rating specifies the maximum weight on any particular axle.
Just check the bus' GVWR and don't go over it... at least too far.
My bus weighs 17.9k as an empty shell... I doubt that any amount of building onto it will max out its 34k GVWR.
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:21 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by livelovelaugh91897 View Post
So I know it's a silly question but while looking at ,Pinterest a great source of ideas, I realize that a lot of the buses have loose knickknacks.
Yes, I see that all the time. Those people - as far as I can tell - don't move their bus very often. They park and live in them. Some of the ones I've seen on Pinterest or Instagram would be terrifying to have on the road, what with all the glass on high shelves and unsecured furniture.
Everyone has their own idea of what they want to do with their bus. I built mine so that there are NO loose knick knacks so we can be on the road in no time. When it's time to go on the road I just do a quick round of the bus latching all the cupboard doors, turning off the propane, making sure I didn't put objects anywhere silly (like on the top of the wood stove)... The chimney pops off in an instant. The solar panels take 20 minutes to bring down and secure. When I'm on the road I don't bother putting them up, but when I'll be parked for a while I'll angle them appropriately.

Quote:
Originally Posted by livelovelaugh91897 View Post
Can you live in them and travel say year round?
Yes. Build with mobility in mind. Secure everything. Build cabinets with latching doors and drawers. Whenever I add something to the bus I think of what it would do in the event of a crash. If it scares you then it's wrong.
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Old 08-30-2015, 07:45 PM   #4
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Whenever I add something to the bus I think of what it would do in the event of a crash. If it scares you then it's wrong.

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Old 08-30-2015, 09:23 PM   #5
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I won't be getting hit in the back of head with a 10 pound cast iron skillet. Well at least now that I don't have a girlfriend.
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Old 08-30-2015, 09:46 PM   #6
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Welcome

The single most important part of a full time living bus is insulation.

In order to have enough roof and floor space for that insulation, you need to raise the roof minimum 12 inches.

IMO I would not live in a bus without a roof raise.

Best bet is head over to the build thread section and start reading. Everything you need to know is there. You will get a great ton of idea's for your own bus.

I read every build that happens here. It's my favorite section and pass time.

Nat
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:24 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Yes, I see that all the time. Those people - as far as I can tell - don't move their bus very often. They park and live in them. Some of the ones I've seen on Pinterest or Instagram would be terrifying to have on the road, what with all the glass on high shelves and unsecured furniture.
Everyone has their own idea of what they want to do with their bus. I built mine so that there are NO loose knick knacks so we can be on the road in no time. When it's time to go on the road I just do a quick round of the bus latching all the cupboard doors, turning off the propane, making sure I didn't put objects anywhere silly (like on the top of the wood stove)... The chimney pops off in an instant. The solar panels take 20 minutes to bring down and secure. When I'm on the road I don't bother putting them up, but when I'll be parked for a while I'll angle them appropriately.



Yes. Build with mobility in mind. Secure everything. Build cabinets with latching doors and drawers. Whenever I add something to the bus I think of what it would do in the event of a crash. If it scares you then it's wrong.
Thank you so much for the reply I'm glad I'm not the only one terrified with all the knickknacks. But I definitely will take mobility into account.
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:25 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by crazycal View Post
I won't be getting hit in the back of head with a 10 pound cast iron skillet. Well at least now that I don't have a girlfriend.
Haha that funny
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:27 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Welcome

The single most important part of a full time living bus is insulation.

In order to have enough roof and floor space for that insulation, you need to raise the roof minimum 12 inches.

IMO I would not live in a bus without a roof raise.

Best bet is head over to the build thread section and start reading. Everything you need to know is there. You will get a great ton of idea's for your own bus.

I read every build that happens here. It's my favorite section and pass time.

Nat
Why a roof raise? Is there another way other than roof raise?
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:22 AM   #10
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it takes me about 1 beer to get setup, we store everything that is loose in milk crates (lamps, s/p holders, art and knicknacks etc)

1st thing when we arrive:

We level out and park, as I go and check power pole, wife pulls out water hose and sewer hose and sets them outside and starts by putting milk crates on table and counters

I grab the power cable and we both get off the bus, I plug in and she check's for polarity (peek into window at tester plugged into receptacle) and I use a fluk meter on a couple places of bus and then give a clear, she goes up and gets a glass of wine and a beer for me, at this point I have water and sewer hooked up, I let her know and she bleeds water lines and turns on toilet fill, I flip switch for water heater and in 15 min we are relaxing

Getting ready to leave takes a couple hours to get everything put up

we store the ice cream maker and kuerig in the sink with a towel between them, and they then go onto windshield ledge when parked


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