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Old 07-22-2018, 07:00 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 39
Mci 96a3

Whats the thoughts on the 1989 MCI 96A3?

Found a deal on one and kinda wonder thoughts?
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Old 07-22-2018, 08:20 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 814
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
What engine and transmission does it have? Who owns it now, and who owned it previously - what is its history? Where is it located now, and where was it used previously? Are there service records for it, and what has been replaced/rebuilt/overhauled? Is it seated, stripped, an entertainer, converted, or what? If converted, by who? And how much is the seller wanting for it? Give us some specifics, then we can help you.

My Crown has the same drivetrain as many MC9s, MC12s and 96A3s, so I may be able to give you some ideas of what to look for.

John
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Old 07-22-2018, 08:53 PM   #3
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 828
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: International
Engine: TE 444
Rated Cap: 12
MCI 96a3's I drove had 6V92's they were from that time
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Old 07-23-2018, 07:51 AM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 39
Here is what I know:

Who has it: SUPERMAX MOTORS AND A GOFF LIMOUSINE AND BUS COMPANY
$2600 asking price

1989 MCI Motor Coach Bus

Miles showing 14,695


Type Coach
Year 1989
Make MCI
Model 96A3 Motor Coach
Color Exterior White/Stainless
Color Seat Interior Blue Festive
Seats 47
Tinted Windows Yes
Video Yes
Engine Detroit
Trans Allison
VIN 1TUDCH8A7KR007109
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Old 07-23-2018, 08:56 AM   #5
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,462
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Still need more specifics. Detroit made lots of diesel engines and probably 95% of all automatic buses have an Allison tranny of one model or another. The particulars of each can range from Awesome to Awful.
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Old 07-23-2018, 01:33 PM   #6
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Location: Motor City
Posts: 91
https://www.ebay.com/itm/BAM-SUPER-D...d=323319208637
(Not much info there....)

That one "sold"? Says they have/had 4 like it?
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Old 07-23-2018, 02:32 PM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ennonne View Post
https://www.ebay.com/itm/BAM-SUPER-D...d=323319208637
(Not much info there....)

That one "sold"? Says they have/had 4 like it?
When I e-mailed them they have 4 now and more coming in all in the price point.

It was more of good or bad thing.

But I think my wife has her heart set on a "Dog-Nose" Skoolie though..
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Old 07-23-2018, 02:47 PM   #8
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Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 959
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by navonifamily View Post
Whats the thoughts on the 1989 MCI 96A3?
I have a 1998 MCI 102-EL3 and can say that, for at least that year and model, the construction and equipment is excellent. These coaches are built for millions of miles and generally accomplish that. For example; the stainless steel construction pretty much eliminates corrosion issues (whether or not the reference coach uses SS, I do not know). The mileage listed may be what the meter "reads" but it is most certainly not the total mileage. I'd guess it's off by at least a million miles, maybe more. However; that is not necessarily a bad thing, assuming it was cared for.

As always, it would be nice to get a good coach mechanic to give it a thorough inspection. Of course, that is usually easier said than done.

This page might help with the specs.
http://mci102.com/mci_specifications...2096A3%20COACH
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Old 07-23-2018, 02:50 PM   #9
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 814
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
OK, it's a seated bus, maybe or maybe not still in revenue service. $2600 is barely more than scrap value, so methinks it is little more than scrap! For that price it's safe to assume that all the useful life has been sucked out of it, and there are (or very soon will be) major costs to keep it on the road. Without knowing what part of the country it is in now, and where it spent all its previous life, it's impossible to guess how much rust there is in the understructure. If it's a NE or PNW bus it will be rusted, the only question being by how much. If it's a SW bus it probably is relatively rust-free, but all the window seals may be dried out from the sun. Are there service records available, and if so who actually did the work - a reputable bus facility, or some guy in a back alley with a few Harbor Freight wrenches and an oily rag? I'll guess it has a 6V92 engine if it's a 1989 Detroit, and if so it may well have an HT740 transmission. If well cared for, and just as importantly if also well driven, then that drivetrain should be good for a very long time, but if it's been mistreated by someone who doesn't understand how to care for and feed a 2-stroke, then it could well be knackered - Detroits do NOT tolerate overheating or lugging, both of which will kill the engine. HT740s are pretty bulletproof, but sooner or later they'll need work by an Allison facility or someone who knows them well; you don't just take one to Pep Boys for service! Obviously the odometer is just a meaningless number at this stage: MCI built the MC9s and MC12s for a 3-million mile life, but that's assuming standard maintenance during that time, including a few engine and transmission replacements. First-tier operators such as Greyhound had good service for their fleet, then after ten years or so their buses would be sold off to second-tier operators whose care may or may not be good, then when they could no longer make money from their fleet it would be sold or given to a third-tier operator such as churches who often placed more trust in god than good mechanics.

If the bus is close to where you are (where are you?) then go and have a look at it, but be prepared to see major corrosion underneath, leaking and dripping everywhere, cracked airbags, worn brake drums, old tired hoses, frayed wiring, etc etc. It could be fun to take it for a test drive, assuming it actually still drives, then you'll be able to assess wear and play in the steering, how well the transmission shifts, how much power the engine still has, how much it smokes and what color the smoke is, what works and what doesn't, and everything else that indicates how much money will need to be spent. I paid almost twice this bus's asking price for my bus ten years ago, and for that money I had expectations of a sound bus in good working order with excellent service during its entire life, and that's what I got. Sorry to sound so negative, but if someone's selling a 30-year-old MCI for scrap value it's unrealistic to expect unicorns and rainbows.

Caveat Emptor.

John
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Old 07-23-2018, 02:57 PM   #10
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
OK, it's a seated bus, maybe or maybe not still in revenue service. $2600 is barely more than scrap value, so methinks it is little more than scrap! For that price it's safe to assume that all the useful life has been sucked out of it, and there are (or very soon will be) major costs to keep it on the road. Without knowing what part of the country it is in now, and where it spent all its previous life, it's impossible to guess how much rust there is in the understructure. If it's a NE or PNW bus it will be rusted, the only question being by how much. If it's a SW bus it probably is relatively rust-free, but all the window seals may be dried out from the sun. Are there service records available, and if so who actually did the work - a reputable bus facility, or some guy in a back alley with a few Harbor Freight wrenches and an oily rag? I'll guess it has a 6V92 engine if it's a 1989 Detroit, and if so it may well have an HT740 transmission. If well cared for, and just as importantly if also well driven, then that drivetrain should be good for a very long time, but if it's been mistreated by someone who doesn't understand how to care for and feed a 2-stroke, then it could well be knackered - Detroits do NOT tolerate overheating or lugging, both of which will kill the engine. HT740s are pretty bulletproof, but sooner or later they'll need work by an Allison facility or someone who knows them well; you don't just take one to Pep Boys for service! Obviously the odometer is just a meaningless number at this stage: MCI built the MC9s and MC12s for a 3-million mile life, but that's assuming standard maintenance during that time, including a few engine and transmission replacements. First-tier operators such as Greyhound had good service for their fleet, then after ten years or so their buses would be sold off to second-tier operators whose care may or may not be good, then when they could no longer make money from their fleet it would be sold or given to a third-tier operator such as churches who often placed more trust in god than good mechanics.

If the bus is close to where you are (where are you?) then go and have a look at it, but be prepared to see major corrosion underneath, leaking and dripping everywhere, cracked airbags, worn brake drums, old tired hoses, frayed wiring, etc etc. It could be fun to take it for a test drive, assuming it actually still drives, then you'll be able to assess wear and play in the steering, how well the transmission shifts, how much power the engine still has, how much it smokes and what color the smoke is, what works and what doesn't, and everything else that indicates how much money will need to be spent. Sorry to sound so negative, but if someone's selling a 30-years-old bus for scrap value it's unrealistic to expect unicorns and rainbows.

Caveat Emptor.

John
No worry on negatives. I'm still learning, looking and shopping.

I'm in Michigan and per the conversation the said bus is in Virginia.

Right now it's shopping time and in a month will be buying time..
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