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Old 03-01-2015, 10:26 AM   #1
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Measuring curves

How do people get the curves marked out for cutting walls to fit the curvature of the roof? uploadfromtaptalk1425223558898.jpg
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:31 AM   #2
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How do people get the curves marked out for cutting walls to fit the curvature of the roof? Attachment 6324
Cut a cardboard template then transfer is what I have seen done on a few builds.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:33 AM   #3
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Its more the measuring of the curve that stumps me. Cardboard makes sense because its lightweight.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:36 AM   #4
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lightweight, free, easy to cut with scissors and if you mess up there is always more laying about. A bit of caulking should hide any mistake made in wood and add a bit of flex. Good luck!
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Old 03-01-2015, 01:46 PM   #5
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I have an extra "trick" with cardboard - hot melt glue. You can actually mock up entire cabinets and such by just tacking pieces together, and the yellow hot-melt is plenty strong enough to hold up well. You can mock up entire rooms and cabinets this way with only a small pile of moving boxes cut up. When you're happy with it all, the hot melt "pops" off with a screwdriver and you're ready to do the real thing.
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Old 03-01-2015, 01:57 PM   #6
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That can be fun. Loads of extra work though. So far, imagining and building has worked for me.
uploadfromtaptalk1425236237061.jpg
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:05 PM   #7
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To get a good template going, I do this. Measure the upright board--mark it from bottom to top in 3" increments. Measure from the mark to the wall + write it down. Transfer the numbers from the curved area to a piece of cardboard.

Example (I had it worse-my walls curve the whole way) from 3" up to 60" is 48" to the wall.
63" = 47 1/2"
66" 47"
69" =46 1/2"
etc.
When you mark the dots on cardboard, draw a line to connect the dots. You'll get a nice close arc to the roofline.
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Old 03-01-2015, 08:07 PM   #8
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Many ways...

Here are a few from the internet. Mostly because I don't feel like typing it all out yet again...

Matching Curves With A Tick Stick

How to Scribe for a Perfect Fit

Carpentry 101: Scribe for a Better Fit | DoItYourself.com

I suggest that once you get your template made, you keep it in a safe place so that you can use it again.

For small areas, I have a 10" and a 6" contour gauge. For large areas, I use basically the same principle.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:11 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by sdwarf36 View Post
To get a good template going, I do this. Measure the upright board--mark it from bottom to top in 3" increments. Measure from the mark to the wall + write it down. Transfer the numbers from the curved area to a piece of cardboard.

Example (I had it worse-my walls curve the whole way) from 3" up to 60" is 48" to the wall.
63" = 47 1/2"
66" 47"
69" =46 1/2"
etc.
When you mark the dots on cardboard, draw a line to connect the dots. You'll get a nice close arc to the roofline.
My son came by today to help me cut and install a one piece shower stall. We did this trick in 4" increments. It seems to have worked great. Now if we could just get the shower stall to tip up into place. We can't seem to find a way to get it upright. Doh!
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:09 AM   #10
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Have you tried taking it to the front of the bus? More headroom there!
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