Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-21-2018, 08:42 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 37
Year: 1999
Chassis: MVP ER
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Need Help With Leak

I have a fuel tank leak on my bus. We are in Mississippi on vacation. Does anyone know of ways to repair a diesel fuel tank. The tank is almost 3/4 full. The leak is a fast drip. Maybe 3-4 drips per second. We are at the Holiday Inn and it has a good puddle running down the lot. The leak is near the corner perhaps the weld. Too fast to really pin point it.
budbud7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 08:46 AM   #2
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 3,116
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
DIY option:

https://www.amazon.com/Versachem-901.../dp/B002N5JAO2
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 11:29 AM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
ol trunt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 2,157
Year: 1935
Coachwork: Superior
Chassis: Chevy
Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
A million years ago and in another era, when our old skool gas tanks developed pin hole leaks (from rust) people would scrub "Ivory" soap into the holes to stop the leak--it worked. Back in the 60's and 70's when I spent a lot of time off roading I used the trick to seal the leaking rolled crimp on a couple of poorly made 5 gallon gas cans. Once I had the seams filled I wiped off the excess and covered the filled seams with Bondo. Ten years later, still no leaks. If your leaks are small and you haven't found a better option you might try using the old soap trick. If you do, let us know how things went. Jack
ol trunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 01:30 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Ninjakitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Brevard County, FL
Posts: 492
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: Ford
Engine: 6.6 New Holland Dies
Rated Cap: 60 kids, 10 window
I used in weld to seal a pinhole leak on the gas tank of my old Mazda truck. Drained the tank, JB welded the hole. Never leaked. Don't know if that's safe but it worked.
__________________
Nick
Ninjakitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 01:30 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Ninjakitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Brevard County, FL
Posts: 492
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: Ford
Engine: 6.6 New Holland Dies
Rated Cap: 60 kids, 10 window
Could also try marine putty in the stick. Not sure if it reacts with diesel when it dries, but you could test it out in small cup.of diesel off to the side.
__________________
Nick
Ninjakitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 02:00 PM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
milkmania's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
Posts: 2,290
Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
JB Welded bottom side of tank on a '69 Nova when I was a kid... several years later it was still holding.

damn, I miss that car!
__________________
I once complained I had no shoes....
Until I met a man with no feet
milkmania is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 05:01 PM   #7
Bus Nut
 
david.dgeorge07's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 979
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Thomas
Engine: CAT 3126
Thatís too bad. Ugh. Let us know how it turns out.
__________________
My Build Thread:

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/4-...ner-18205.html
david.dgeorge07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 10:14 PM   #8
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 37
Year: 1999
Chassis: MVP ER
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Just got back in from working on leak. I got some putty from Auto Zone for leaking tanks. Its dripping so fast and holding a flash light is not working. I brought two package of the putty so I'll try the other one in the morning. Perhaps that stuff on Amazon is better but I need it now. I have a hairline crack about 1.5" long on a weld, which I think makes the job more challenging.
budbud7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2018, 10:19 PM   #9
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 37
Year: 1999
Chassis: MVP ER
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
A million years ago and in another era, when our old skool gas tanks developed pin hole leaks (from rust) people would scrub "Ivory" soap into the holes to stop the leak--it worked. Back in the 60's and 70's when I spent a lot of time off roading I used the trick to seal the leaking rolled crimp on a couple of poorly made 5 gallon gas cans. Once I had the seams filled I wiped off the excess and covered the filled seams with Bondo. Ten years later, still no leaks. If your leaks are small and you haven't found a better option you might try using the old soap trick. If you do, let us know how things went. Jack
I might try the ivory soap if I can find some. If i can stop the flow 10 seconds I think I can apply the putty.
budbud7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2018, 07:46 AM   #10
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 37
Year: 1999
Chassis: MVP ER
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Well so far the leak has stopped. Thanks to the info and tips here. i had packed some iris spring soap so I used it and it worked. I also put that putty on top of the soap. Don't know if that putty will stick to the soap but it is not leaking. Once we start driving it may start back because of the flexing of the bus but we are good for now. Thanks again and give God the glory!
budbud7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.