Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-15-2007, 02:01 PM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 49
i'm 26, and have seen and owned many a floor switched high beam vehicle.
__________________
1991 Blue Bird TC2000 shell version
5.9 Cummins/AT545 Allison
The Wanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2007, 02:21 PM   #12
Almost There
 
nyrockingchairs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Western New York
Posts: 98
I bet my father has seen his share
__________________
1988 Chevrolet S6000 8.2L Detroit Diesel
nyrockingchairs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2007, 02:37 PM   #13
Bus Crazy
 
Elliot Naess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Clearlake, Northern California
Posts: 2,116
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: TC-2000 Frt Eng, Tranny:MT643
Engine: 5,9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 84
This is one of the wondermuss things about Life On Earth As A Human. The variety of
experiences! A friend of mine drove a 1930 Model A Ford as daily transportation
until 1986.

And then there are the teenagers who actually understand how these
Konfounded Komputors work.
__________________
Elliot
Millicent The Bus - roof raised two feet, toy-hauler tailgate.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...gate-1564.html
Elliot Naess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2007, 02:37 PM   #14
Almost There
 
nyrockingchairs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Western New York
Posts: 98
How does one tell the difference between 2 and 4 stroke? Did not see any label detailing this info...um ignore this one, I figured it out from rereading everything...
__________________
1988 Chevrolet S6000 8.2L Detroit Diesel
nyrockingchairs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2007, 05:27 PM   #15
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
You have a 4 stroke. There are a bunch of ways to tell the difference, but my favorite is sound.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2007, 06:12 PM   #16
Bus Crazy
 
Elliot Naess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Clearlake, Northern California
Posts: 2,116
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: TC-2000 Frt Eng, Tranny:MT643
Engine: 5,9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 84
Those old 2 stroke Detroits were nick-named Screamin' Demon -- for a reason.

All the 2 stroke diesels that I know of have a mechanical compressor (supercharger)
to push air into the cylinder. Many have a turbocharger on top of that. The mechanical
"positive displacement" compressor is used instead of pumping the intake air thru
the crankcase as on 2 stroke motorcycles and the like.
The "blower" on the GMC/Detroit "Screamin' Demon" model 6/71 was the origin
of the blowers on dragsters.
__________________
Elliot
Millicent The Bus - roof raised two feet, toy-hauler tailgate.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...gate-1564.html
Elliot Naess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2007, 04:31 PM   #17
Almost There
 
nyrockingchairs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Western New York
Posts: 98
custom fuel tanks

Well I have decided that I am going to build my own custom tanks. First off will be an 80 Gallon Veggie Fuel Tank. Basically I will be taking a full sheet of 7/8" Plywood and building a box, fiber-glassing both the inside and outside for strength and to make it water proof. Then I can cut holes and install the heating elements, exchangers and fittings I want. The beauty of an 80 Gallon is that it comes from 1 sheet of plywood, plus an 2'x4' piece for the ends, HD and Lowes both sell these smaller pieces pre-cut. So the basic tank dimensions will be 48"x20"x20".

I build custom plywood fish tanks of 125 gallons or bigger using this method so I am confident in the strength and water proofing. I just never take the liquid up to 150 F. So I am going to build a smaller one for testing at temperature, will let you know how it turns out and the costs and such. Like I said, I build these tanks all the time so I have fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin readily available since I buy in bulk. But usually a project of 80 gallons or more is cost effective using this method for fish tanks, for fuel tanks i think this is cost effective no matter what size. For water holding tanks at $40 for 40 gallon, you are better off buying the tank.

The other obstacle I need to overcome is fishtanks are always open top so glassing the inside is pretty easy. I need to come up with a way to strap down the lid securely enough to prevent splash over. But I have a nice open-bed truck for splosh testing too. Will be building in baffolds to help minimize splosh effect as well.

The snow is finally melting. By Thursday I should be able to get out there and start getting the old windshields out so my glass guy can cut me new ones. Anyone ever take these things out before and know what is involved?
__________________
1988 Chevrolet S6000 8.2L Detroit Diesel
nyrockingchairs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2007, 11:32 PM   #18
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
What kind of resin do you use and what kind of cloth? I've often wanted to try out fiberglass, but my experience is limited to patching up my old pig of a duck boat (God rest her soul). What about the guys that use fleece? Is it some special type that they're using?
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2007, 07:02 AM   #19
Almost There
 
nyrockingchairs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Western New York
Posts: 98
fiber-glassing

I prefer the west system epoxy resin. I keep both 205 (fast) and 206 (slow) hardeners around the shop depending what I am working on and the temperature I am working in. I like West because it is a very good product and you can buy those conveniant pumps that meter out the resin and hardener in the exact ratio quantities you need. Though West is probably the most expensive Epoxy-Resin you can buy I have never had a failure and when dealing with 125+ gallons of liquid I don't ever want a failure.

For the cloth I just buy plain 6 ounce Hexcel cloth. Most boating supply stores carry both the cloth and the epoxy resin. While I don't mind buying the epoxy resin at a pricey boat store because you have to factor in shipping from an on-line place,
http://www.fiberglasssite.com
That is the best price I have found on the cloth yet and I tend to buy it 50 yards at a time, shipping is reasonable, and they will sell down to 5 or 10 yard quanties, if you call them they might sell less.

I am sure you know you can just cut the cloth with a nice pair of shears, my wife got pissed off at me after using her nice quilting shears so she finally bought me my own pair so I wouldn't dull hers and have to resharpen them.

I also use the quilting rotary cutters for cutting the cloth, when using scissors I hate dealing with cloth that bunches, with the rotary cutter I just lay the cloth out on my table and can lay a straight edge on it and rotary cut the whole thing quickly. Jo-Anns sells the rotary cutters and the replacement blades are cheap enough. Again my wife gave me one after I kept taking hers. The table will get scratched up and they make cutting boards specifically for the rotary cutters but again I have to borrow my wifes if I want to use it, I just cut on my work-shop table and don't care about scratches.

For the actual application of the epoxy-resin I use the rubber squeegees that you buy for doing automotive body work. After the epoxy cures on them you just flex them and the epoxy breaks right off, I have had the same set for 5 years. I also buy kitchen rubber spatulas that I can shape for the hard-to-work corners and such. Once the cloth is applied and the wetting coat of epoxy is applied with the squeegees I will switch over to the cheap 1" foam paint rollers for spreading the filler layers of epoxy-resin and just throw those away. Make sure you take them off the roller before they cure or else you will be buying new roller handles as well.

When working in the boxes, mind the pooling of excess resin in the bottom, if it gets too thick it could crack during curing, I have had enough cracks in my cured epoxy that I had to grind out and restart that I know what I don't want to do. It is easier to add more epoxy than to take away epoxy if you have too much.

I have an entire write up on the building of a fiber-glass aquarium, it is posted on a fish-site. If you go to http://www.cichlid-forum.com and if you follow the Library link on the left and then scroll down and find the DIY section, there are a few articles on building the plywood aquariums. Just ignore the parts about the acrylic front/sides and build a solid box. I tend to use Stainless Steel screws rather than brass, I don't care about the color of my exposed screw heads and prefer the square-drive screws.

For the baffolds I am just going to use the same 7/8" plywood, cut some 1" holes near the bottom (break out the bottom edge with the band saw), epoxy them (don't think they need cloth since they don't need to be strong) and glue/screw them into place inside the tank. That way the liquid cannot get any linear movement built up.

For the top of the oil and water tanks I am just going to cut the top out, glass it up and then use liquid nails to glue and screw it on, then fiber glass the outside corners, since the top will never be immersed I think this will be enough to prevent spillage.

I know nothing about the fleece applications.

I will document the 80-gallon oil tank and post it on here and/or my other bus-building web site as I go.

If you are going to have the tank exposed inside the bus and use for a bench seat or something, you might want to consider using the oak or maple plywood. I tend to use this even if it is not exposed because it is usually better quality than the regualr construction plywood. The oil tank will be built from this and then a separate insulated box will be built around it so no one can touch the inner tank and risk burning themselves.
__________________
1988 Chevrolet S6000 8.2L Detroit Diesel
nyrockingchairs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2007, 09:17 AM   #20
Skoolie
 
sportyrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: mid Mo.
Posts: 241
Year: 1976
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: F33695
Engine: 427 chevy
Rated Cap: 84
oil tank

for all that work you could go get a sheet of 16 ga steel ($60) and build a tank and not worry what little demon will raise his ugly head down the road. I don't think the fiberglass tank is a good idea. Great for a fish tank that is open on the top, filled with water and not heated to that temperature. If you ever get any alcohol in there it will break down the resin and you will have a soggy mess. sportyrick
sportyrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Skoolie Conversion and Old Skoolie Remodel jlhollowx13 Skoolie Conversion Projects 0 01-22-2013 02:41 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.