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Old 10-01-2018, 01:35 PM   #1
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One-Way Valve and Combo Tank

I'd like to see a discussion on these relatively new valves that allow a one-way flow of fluid through the plumbing. It seems to me that in using these valves one could combine the grey and black water tanks into a single combo tank that holds both grey and black waste water.



When I think about the advantages of a single combo waste water tank, I see how solids would no longer be able to build up as they do in a black water tank. The water from the faucets and shower would work to break up the solid matter. This would mean fewer erroneous readings from the black water tank on your tank level meter.

I think this is a win-win. What do you think?

Please do NOT post about cat boxes (composting toilets). This post is about using water in the plumbing.

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Old 10-01-2018, 03:03 PM   #2
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I'd be curious to see what these new fandangled one-way valves are that you were talking about. One-way valves or check valves. have been around for a long time if it's the Standard Plumbing ones that I'm thinking of. if everything is going into one tank it's not a "combo tank" it's just one big black tank.
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:31 PM   #3
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I'd be curious to see what these new fandangled one-way valves are that you were talking about. One-way valves or check valves. have been around for a long time if it's the Standard Plumbing ones that I'm thinking of. if everything is going into one tank it's not a "combo tank" it's just one big black tank.
I saw a bus some years ago that was originally equipped with a single waste tank. After being on the road for a few months the owner redid the waste plumbing and added a second tank to keep grey and black separate.
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:35 PM   #4
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Even with traps built into plumbing I would still be afraid that the smell from the tank would back up through the sinks if you had only one tank.
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:35 PM   #5
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The HEPvO valve is an alternative to a standard, water-filled trap. It takes up less space than a trap and does not dry out over time. Both prevent waste water odors from getting into your living space.

Separating grey and black water is a different issue. In a pinch, grey water could be drained without using a an RV dump station that is designed to treat black water.
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:19 PM   #6
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I have heard nothing but good things about the Hepvo units from folks using them. Going that route myself. Can save quite a bit of (precious) undercounter space by losing the P-Trap. Mine will actually go beneath the floor in the drain lines.
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:20 PM   #7
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Even with traps built into plumbing I would still be afraid that the smell from the tank would back up through the sinks if you had only one tank.
Smell can't penetrate if you use a proper P trap.
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:22 PM   #8
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Unless you park it long enough for the traps to dry out. Seen that happen many times with "occasional" drivers.
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:24 PM   #9
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I would think that once the bus has been driven, enough the water would slosh out of the the trap until the next time the sink is used.
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Smell can't penetrate if you use a proper P trap.
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:25 PM   #10
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Unless you park it long enough for the traps to dry out. Seen that happen many times with "occasional" drivers.
I would not keep a black tank full if parked for extended time.
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