Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-15-2016, 12:24 AM   #11
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Winlcok, WA
Posts: 1,607
7.3L diesel engines generally do not run hot. So if you are running hot there are not a lot of reasons as to why that might be happening.

First off, as it has been noted before, make sure the fan is operating properly. Most were not directly driven and have some sort of clutch. It is very obvious when the fan cycles on and off as it will create a lot of noise and can actually slow you down if you are going up a grade.
First part B would be a loose fan belt. If the belt isn't tight enough when the fan kicks in it could just be slipping the belt and not really turning the fan. First part C would be a fan shroud that is letting air suck in around the edges instead of pulling the air through the radiator.

Second, your water pump may have an impeller that has eroded to the point where it is no longer pumping enough gpm's to keep the engine cool.

Third, as has been noted, the thermostat needs to be operating correctly. It may or may not be opening when it is supposed to or it may be only opening partially which could restrict the flow.

Fourth, and the most likely problem, is your radiator might be plugged up. It can't be stressed enough how important it is to have the pH nearly neutral in the cooling system of a diesel engine. With the pH too high or too low you can get scale developing which can clog a radiator up.

If you don't already have one you need to purchase an infrared thermometer. You can then determine how hot stuff is or isn't. The factory gauges are only a guideline and they are notoriously inaccurate. The only real use is to know the range in which they normally operate. If suddenly the gauge is reading too high or too low you know you have a problem.

With an infrared thermometer you can determine how hot things are on either side of the thermostat housing. If when things are hot and it is the same temp on both sides of the housing then I would say the thermostat is most likely operating properly.

You should have an minimum of 20* difference between the top and bottom of the radiator. 30+ degrees difference would be a lot better. If it is significantly warmer at the outlet than the lowest temp in the radiator it could signify the radiator is not cooling properly. If it is less than 10* difference from top to bottom then I would say your radiator is not cooling properly.

The size your bus is with as cold as it would appear the day was when the picture was taken the normal state of affairs would suggest you would need a piece of cardboard to cover a good part of the radiator so you could get enough heat out of the heaters to defrost the windows. Running warm on a day that cold is not normal for an IHC bus, regardless of how steep the grade might have been.

If the radiator has good temperature differential, if the fan is working properly, if the thermostat is working properly, and it is still puking coolant out you may have a head gasket that is allowing heat to go directly into the water jacket.

It may not be a reason but when the heaters were removed it is a possibility that an air bubble is stuck in the system. An air bubble won't let water circulate properly. But if you are getting good heat out of the remaining heaters and defrosters then I don't think that is the problem.

Good luck and keep us posted as to your progress.
cowlitzcoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2016, 12:53 AM   #12
Site Team
 
crazycal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4,087
Cowlitzcoach, I like when you post. You are very thorough with your answers. I don't have the attention span or the energy to do that.

I just want to fly.
__________________
I'm hungry!

You Gotta Let Me Fly
crazycal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2016, 01:42 AM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
little busito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 29
Good gracious I love you people

I'll show all this to the Handsome Man and let you know what's up. Can't tell you all how much I appreciate the help!
__________________
BUSTER BROWN
1990 International/Wayne 8-window
little busito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2016, 08:46 AM   #14
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,093
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazycal View Post
Cowlitzcoach, I like when you post. You are very thorough with your answers. I don't have the attention span or the energy to do that.

I just want to fly.
I love this post and can identify with the sentiment.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 12:47 AM   #15
Mini-Skoolie
 
little busito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 29
Got some great news yesterday! So my inlaws mechanic friend connected us with the boroughs (our version of a school district or county) head mechanic at the bus pool. Until recently, the bus pool was a fleet of 35 of the exact same buses as ours! Heres what the overheating thing turned out to be: louvres over the radiator that were a part of some add-on that the borough bought for the buses up here called the polar package or the arctic package, or something like that. Basically two louvres over the radiator that help the engine heat up in arctic temps that are supposed to open at a certain temp. Theyre also notorious for getting stuck shut on our rough roads up here. The mechanic told Brad to take them off and lose them forever, and to clean out the grill with an air compressor. We took it out for a long spin up multiple hills afterwards and a long run at about 60-65 and zero signs of anything getting hot.

Had you all ever heard of this aftermarket polar package louvre thing? We're just so glad it wasnt a head gasket we could buy you all a round of drinks
__________________
BUSTER BROWN
1990 International/Wayne 8-window
little busito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 01:57 AM   #16
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Alberta
Posts: 16
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Ford B700
Engine: 5.9, Spicer-5
Rated Cap: 44 Big butts/66 Lil ones
They're called shutters and a lot of older trucks, busses, farm tractors etc. used them. As long as they were built heavy enough and maintained they were wonderful. You didn't have to use a winter-front or (as most of us poor-people used; a chunk of cardboard and haywire/baler twine/twist ties/bungee cords etc. etc.) when old man winter started blowin up yer keester, just to keep the old girl warm enough to defrost the windows and maybe if you were lucky, keep the toes from gettin frostbit. Never could figure out why they quit making shutters. I often wished I had them on my 97 dodge-cummins(and numerous other trucks I've driven). It was tough to keep warm if it wasn't working hard which it rarely did. But as soon as the day warmed up a bit I had to stop and remove the winter front cause it was overheating. What a PITA.! Guess that's PROGRESS!
one_eyed_jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 03:58 AM   #17
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Alberta
Posts: 16
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Ford B700
Engine: 5.9, Spicer-5
Rated Cap: 44 Big butts/66 Lil ones
Should have described shutters a bit.
They were very much like venetian window blinds. ie. a bunch of aluminum slats covering the radiator, sometimes vertical, sometimes horizontal. Sometimes in front of the rad and sometimes behind it. So that when closed they blocked-off airflow through the rad. The slats were generally opened by a air cylinder which was controlled by a shutter-stat. Sooo the cooling process went something like this. As the engine temp climbed, firstly the thermostat would open and allow coolant to flow through the rad, if that wasn't enough to cool it down, next the shutter-stat would tell the shutters to open and allow air to pass through the rad. And if that still wasn't enough cooling effect then the fan-stat would engage the cooling fan which pulled even more cool air through.
Which reminds me of a funny story. A few years back I was driving gravel truck for a constuction company out of Red Deer Alberta. Our job was to deliver bedding material (sand and screened rock) to the underground crews who were installing sewer and water pipelines into new residential areas. Quite often we had to negotaite our way through some narrow streets, past schools, existing homes, golf courses and such. So this one time we were hauling past a golf course in Sylvan Lake Alberta on very narrow streets.
So my buddy and I happened to meet up on our rounds at this new subdivision and he practically fell out of his truck; he was laughing so hard. Now anyone who has been near a large engine in the heat of summer when the cooling fan kicks in will know they make quite a noise and the unaware can be fairly startled by the sudden racket. Well what happened was when Frank was rolling by the golf course his fan suddenly kicked-in just as he was passing within a couple feet of a young lady lifting a cooler full of beer, hot dogs, catchup, mustard( well you get the picture I'm sure!) out of the back of her minivan!! Well that cooler with all its contents went flying up in the air and subsequently spread themselves all over that street!!
Of course you know, the truck driver is always the idiot even though he has no control over when or where that fan is going to cut in!
Of course twenty-twenty hindsight a driver could switch the fan on manual so that it runs continual but a guy just doesn't think that way, till after the beer gets spilled!
Carry On!
One_Eyed_Jack
one_eyed_jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 08:07 AM   #18
Bus Crazy
 
Scooternj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: EHT New Jersey
Posts: 1,134
Year: 2003
Coachwork: AmTran
Chassis: International 3000RE
Engine: T444E/AT545
Rated Cap: 75
Sounds a lot like the armored grill on the old Peacekeeper "armored" truck the Air Force had. There was a swap out order for the summer to one made of chicken wire to keep them from overheating
__________________
Hey! That's not an RV, that's a school bus.
Well thank you for noticing, Captain Obvious

Captain Obvious on deviantArt
Scooternj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 09:04 AM   #19
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Winlcok, WA
Posts: 1,607
I am sorry I didn't include malfunctioning radiator shutters.

I can't say that I have ever seen a 7.3L with radiator shutters so it never occurred to me to check to make sure the shutters were opening all of the way.

I am glad it was a simple fix.
cowlitzcoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2016, 10:36 AM   #20
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,151
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Glad to hear you are looking at a simple fix. Those are the "Barn Doors" I referenced and a pretty common issue when it comes to over heating. But they are very handy in cold climates as most diesels actually run quite cool and take forever to get up to proper running temp.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.