Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-10-2013, 12:48 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Year: 2000
Coachwork: international
Chassis: thomas
Engine: 7.3 diesel
Plywood floor

Hubby was wondering if we should glue plywood to floor, then screw? Or just screw it down with no glue?
sandik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 03:50 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
bapos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Cleburne TX
Posts: 606
Re: Plywood floor

I would say if for some odd reason your going to take it back up I would screw only but if you want it to bond and NOT EVER come back up... then glue and screw.
__________________
Here is my school bus conversion thread http://www.skoolie.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=10282

Pics of my conversion @ photobucket http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b1.../School%20Bus/
bapos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 07:20 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Re: Plywood floor

Gluing it will make sure it stays put and that there are no squeaks. Glue also does a better job dealing with the flex than something like cheap drywall screws will. I used tek screws with glue on mine, but the screws were really just there to clamp it in place until the glue dried.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 08:53 PM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Year: 2000
Coachwork: international
Chassis: thomas
Engine: 7.3 diesel
Re: Plywood floor

Gotcha, thanks!
sandik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 09:59 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
opus's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Montana
Posts: 1,615
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All-American R/E
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Plywood floor

Mine is floating, not attached. I have one squeak but its not because of that.
opus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2013, 01:02 AM   #6
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Plywood floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_experience03
Gluing it will make sure it stays put and that there are no squeaks. Glue also does a better job dealing with the flex than something like cheap drywall screws will. I used tek screws with glue on mine, but the screws were really just there to clamp it in place until the glue dried.
Please for your own sake, do not use drywall screws anywhere in a bus. They are made of vary high tensile steel and break realy easy. I can snap them with my bare fingers.

Same go's for most general purpose construction screws including deck screws. If moved sideways, they snap. A nail would bend 16 times before breaking. This is why nails are used in home building, not screws.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2013, 10:06 AM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
Diesel Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,489
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/AT545
Re: Plywood floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster
...Please for your own sake, do not use drywall screws anywhere in a bus. They are made of vary high tensile steel and break realy easy. I can snap them with my bare fingers.

Same go's for most general purpose construction screws including deck screws. If moved sideways, they snap. A nail would bend 16 times before breaking. This is why nails are used in home building, not screws.

Nat
Nat, I used drywall screws for a lot of the wood stuff I built in my bus, and so far haven't had any problems. I do, however, share your reservations about how brittle they seem to be. In your post you seem to be recommending nails? Wouldn't nails be more likely to loosen up in a mobile application? What type of screws would you recommend, if any?
__________________
Gallery:
http://www.skoolie.net/gallery/v/Skooli ... l_dan_bus/
Conversion Thread:
viewtopic.php?t=4959
Diesel Dan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2013, 11:24 AM   #8
Bus Nut
 
JakeC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: MN
Posts: 732
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Plywood floor

My entire bus is built with these. Most components contacting steel were also glued with construction adhesive.

Torx Screws

BTW, Nat, you must have been bored last night. Some serious grave digging going on, haha!!
__________________
The journey is the destination...

Brutus
JakeC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2013, 12:09 AM   #9
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,937
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Plywood floor

[quote=Diesel Dan]
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nat_ster":fwhi1jj0
...Please for your own sake, do not use drywall screws anywhere in a bus. They are made of vary high tensile steel and break realy easy. I can snap them with my bare fingers.

Same go's for most general purpose construction screws including deck screws. If moved sideways, they snap. A nail would bend 16 times before breaking. This is why nails are used in home building, not screws.

Nat
Nat, I used drywall screws for a lot of the wood stuff I built in my bus, and so far haven't had any problems. I do, however, share your reservations about how brittle they seem to be. In your post you seem to be recommending nails? Wouldn't nails be more likely to loosen up in a mobile application? What type of screws would you recommend, if any?[/quote:fwhi1jj0]

Sorry Dan, I was over tired last night, and should have chosen my wording a bit more carefully.

No to nails. Not in a mobile application. The reference to nails was only a comparison in the material used to make the fasteners.

Screws are definitely the choice for a mobile application. Depending on where they are being used in the build,will determine the type of screws to use.

Wood to steel, like hanging your cabinets, I would use a machine screw. They are made more like a grade 8 bolt, with threads that can cut into and hold the steel.

Wood to wood in shear, I would use a number 8 deck screw up to 2 inches long. Beyond that length , they snap off quite easily. However, if the panel is pulled tightly against the other under compression, the screw will not be able to move sideways, and longer may be used.

For applications like steel joist hangers, post hangers, hurricane straps ect, to wood, the company that make these parts sell structural screws for this application. They are made of a more flexible steel, with a 1/4 socket head for driving them. Most times these screws are number 10s.

Believe it or not, a 1/2 inch crown framing staple will hold more than a nail. They are coated with a glue that is activated by the friction of driving them with the air stapler. They will bend back and forth about 10 times before breaking. Pulling them out is imposable.

For reference, drywall screws are number 6. Holding power without compression, 2 pounds. Holding power with full compression of material 20 pounds.

Deck screws up to 3" are usually a number 8. Holding power without compression, 10 pounds. Holding power with full compression of material 75 pounds.

Structural screws are usually a number 10. Holding power without compression, 40 pounds. Holding power with full compression of material 150 pounds.


The main reason why drywall and deck screws are made from such high tensile steel, is the method used to drive them. There is a lot of torque on that little spot where the bit fits in the head. This is why cheaper brands strip out the heads so much worse than a good quality screw.

This is only a sample of the way over complicated engineering tables of modern fasteners in residential home building. Hope it helps.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeC
My entire bus is built with these. Most components contacting steel were also glued with construction adhesive.

Torx Screws

BTW, Nat, you must have been bored last night. Some serious grave digging going on, haha!!

Gluing and screwing is a good Ida. Screws pull it up tight, glue sets, not only holding in sheer, but also making up for any space that was left between the ply's. As time go's on, construction adhesive only get harder.

And yes Jake, you are spot on. I have bus fever so bad, I could not sleep last night due to not getting the time to work on my buses for two days.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2013, 12:31 PM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
Diesel Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,489
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/AT545
Re: Plywood floor

Nat, thanks for the advice about screws (and the advice about power tools on another thread). This is very useful information!
__________________
Gallery:
http://www.skoolie.net/gallery/v/Skooli ... l_dan_bus/
Conversion Thread:
viewtopic.php?t=4959
Diesel Dan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fastening plywood in a bus putterspitt Conversion General Discussions 11 09-02-2010 04:53 PM
Plywood that curls? Doodlebug Conversion General Discussions 7 02-06-2010 04:08 PM
"standard" plywood under rubber floor? NewSkewlHauler Conversion General Discussions 2 01-24-2010 08:18 AM
OSB vs Plywood elkoskoolie Conversion General Discussions 9 07-19-2009 08:48 PM
Stained Plywood flooring? Highwayman Conversion General Discussions 3 11-18-2006 07:12 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.