Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-15-2016, 12:00 AM   #21
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 4,913
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 1000
Engine: 5.9
Send a message via Yahoo to Robin97396
Cap, I think I'm going to copy your insulation window panel system. That will also help me figure out if I actually want to remove any windows in the future.

Dred, I've been strapping things to the wall but never really gave thought to using the L-track for movable framing. I like it.

JA, it definitely depends on how you want to use it. Winters here aren't that bad, but if I were on a trip to AK I'd have to have a much better setup. I like your idea of moving to better climates and that's what this bus is supposed to provide.
Robin97396 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 12:50 PM   #22
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 4
what tools are needed for the floors

We're starting our conversion tomorrow. But we are looking for all the helpful tips we can get. For starters what tools are needed to rip up the floors and how do we start that process?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gbstewart View Post
get rid of it, the rubber gives off a smell, rip all down to the metal put a coat of paint on the metal, if there's rust fix it. you won't be sorry for doing it, but you may be sorry you didn't do it.
gbstewart
ashbroussard59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:32 PM   #23
Bus Nut
 
FlyboyHPD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 397
Year: 1999
Coachwork: AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashbroussard59 View Post
We're starting our conversion tomorrow. But we are looking for all the helpful tips we can get. For starters what tools are needed to rip up the floors and how do we start that process?
You'll need a long pry bar to help lift the plywood from the floor if the screws are stripped. You may also need an angle grinder. When doing mine I used a skill saw set just to the depth of the plywood itself and cut it into smaller sections. That made getting it up much easier than trying to pry up a whole 4x8 ft section.

Start at the very back of the bus if you have a rear door. Drive the pry bar underneath the wood and start prying it all up.
__________________
1999 International AmTran, DT466E, MD3060
https://flyboyrv.wordpress.com/
FlyboyHPD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:35 PM   #24
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 192
I must've lucked out on my floor. It had no plywood, and the adhesive was old and fairly brittle. A utility knive and prybar took care of removing the floor in about a day. I might've used the grinder for some of the more stubborn bits of aluminum trim holding down the center aisle.
mysty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:37 PM   #25
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 4
No we have a shuttle type bus and it doesn't have a rear door. I appreciate all the input u can give though. We want to learn, grow and develop handy skills from this conversion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyboyHPD View Post
You'll need a long pry bar to help lift the plywood from the floor if the screws are stripped. You may also need an angle grinder. When doing mine I used a skill saw set just to the depth of the plywood itself and cut it into smaller sections. That made getting it up much easier than trying to pry up a whole 4x8 ft section.

Start at the very back of the bus if you have a rear door. Drive the pry bar underneath the wood and start prying it all up.
ashbroussard59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:38 PM   #26
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 4
What kind of bus do you have?
ashbroussard59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:40 PM   #27
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 4,913
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 1000
Engine: 5.9
Send a message via Yahoo to Robin97396
Well said Flyboy.

You guys are going to become very good friends with your local Harbor Freight store, if you're not already.

Some floors come up really easy, while other people really have to work at it to pull everything out. Some of that may be related to the chosen tools for the job. I just use a hammer to get rid of the remaining screws after the plywood is out. Hit the screws like a nail and they either go through or they break off.

Cleaning the floor is self explanatory. I highly suggest go to the car wash and spraying the floor, if not all, of the bus. There's how many years of child originated filth in a bus? Save some of that 20 year old gum, and count the change you find while tearing out the floor.

Have you heard the penny conversation for plugging holes in the floor?
Robin97396 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 01:48 PM   #28
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 4
Robyn97396 no I have not heard that conversation. But I'm eager to hear and learn all that I can from people who are experienced and can help us.
ashbroussard59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 03:18 PM   #29
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 4,913
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 1000
Engine: 5.9
Send a message via Yahoo to Robin97396
A short time ago we have had extensive discussions concerning the use of pennies to cover holes in bus floors. They get epoxied down on the floor where needed. If it takes more than $3 or $4 to patch up your floor, maybe consider laying down some new metal.

The discussions kind of morphed into metalurgy and electroysis of the copper and zink in pennies and went on for days until that subject was thourally worn out. The conclusion was it's probably good to use a similar metal to the steel floor if you're at all worried about corrosion. Alternatives are nickels, dimes, quarters is you've got a fancy bus. Coaches should probably use quarters.

Imagine 30 years from now if someone finds those old coins while putting another floor in the bus.

Obviously similar metals would be best. Loose change is not the preferred way to eliminate holes in your steel floor. It's just one method that has been used, and it's certainly cost effective. Some people weld the holes closed. Not unlike the entire build, it depends on what you think is best because you're the only one that knows how you're going to use your bus.
Robin97396 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2017, 08:37 PM   #30
Bus Nut
 
Rameses's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Posts: 855
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 8.3/Allison MD3060
Rated Cap: 84
Use 1943 pennies to avoid dissimilar metal issues.
Rameses is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.