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Old 02-23-2018, 11:24 AM   #1
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PVC/Plastic Sub Floor?

So I was thinking of what to use as my base for the bus floor.

Most people just lay 1/2 or 3/4 plywood as the first layer, then add runners, more insulation and then a higher quality flooring before laying the final product I think.

What if you used that PVC or shower stall type paneling as that first layer? Its 100% water proof and your putting Plywood over it anyway?

Just think of it as a way to 100% waterproof the floor from below but not if thats necessary?
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Old 02-24-2018, 12:49 AM   #2
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A few arguments for plywood:

1) It's super cheap.

2) It's not brittle like PVC and will hold up to vibration (from driving) much better.

3) It's easy to cut with inexpensive tools. Home Depot/Lowe's will even cut 4'x8' sheets for you in the store.

I don't think waterproofing the floor from underneath is necessary. The very bottom level steel floor (whatever was on the bus when you pulled up the rubber floor) already serves that purpose. You shouldn't be getting much water coming up from under the bus anyway, probably just what comes off the wheels when you drive in the rain.
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Old 02-24-2018, 11:14 PM   #3
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We are laying 3/4 inch plywood in ours.
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Old 02-24-2018, 11:29 PM   #4
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When I work on these, we do 1/2 inch foam board, half inch ply, then add the flooring. We tape all joints in the foam and stager the ply joints so they don't fall on top of the foam joints. It makes for a more stable floor. Also, we run the flooring 90 degrees to the plywood joints so no flooring joints fall on top of the plywood joints. Usually, we lay the ply across the bus floor and run the flooring down the length of the bus.

I have done 1/4 inch foil faced foam board foil side up, 7/16 OSB smooth side up, and glued down vinyl roll flooring. I did this to keep as much interior height as possible. A few years back, I saw on another forum where a guy laid 1/2 inch foam down, then 1/4 inch underlayment, and glued down vinyl roll flooring.

I do advise against using adhesive backed vinyl squares or strips. Every time I have seen these used, they peel up in hot weather (90F+) and really cold weather (below 40F).
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Old 02-25-2018, 12:42 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
When I work on these, we do 1/2 inch foam board, half inch ply, then add the flooring. We tape all joints in the foam and stager the ply joints so they don't fall on top of the foam joints. It makes for a more stable floor. Also, we run the flooring 90 degrees to the plywood joints so no flooring joints fall on top of the plywood joints. Usually, we lay the ply across the bus floor and run the flooring down the length of the bus.

I have done 1/4 inch foil faced foam board foil side up, 7/16 OSB smooth side up, and glued down vinyl roll flooring. I did this to keep as much interior height as possible. A few years back, I saw on another forum where a guy laid 1/2 inch foam down, then 1/4 inch underlayment, and glued down vinyl roll flooring.

I do advise against using adhesive backed vinyl squares or strips. Every time I have seen these used, they peel up in hot weather (90F+) and really cold weather (below 40F).
Thanks. Good info.

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Old 02-25-2018, 10:36 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
When I work on these, we do 1/2 inch foam board, half inch ply, then add the flooring. We tape all joints in the foam and stager the ply joints so they don't fall on top of the foam joints. It makes for a more stable floor. Also, we run the flooring 90 degrees to the plywood joints so no flooring joints fall on top of the plywood joints. Usually, we lay the ply across the bus floor and run the flooring down the length of the bus.

I have done 1/4 inch foil faced foam board foil side up, 7/16 OSB smooth side up, and glued down vinyl roll flooring. I did this to keep as much interior height as possible. A few years back, I saw on another forum where a guy laid 1/2 inch foam down, then 1/4 inch underlayment, and glued down vinyl roll flooring.

I do advise against using adhesive backed vinyl squares or strips. Every time I have seen these used, they peel up in hot weather (90F+) and really cold weather (below 40F).
don't mean to steal the thread, but its time I up date the flooring in my bus, have plywood now, might use vinyl click type planks, but was wondering how they wood hold up in the winter during cold storage -30
tks
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Old 02-25-2018, 12:19 PM   #7
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Thanks. Good info.

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Quote:
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don't mean to steal the thread, but its time I up date the flooring in my bus, have plywood now, might use vinyl click type planks, but was wondering how they wood hold up in the winter during cold storage -30
tks
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I can't say. I've never been in that cold of weather before. I would allow for expansion and contraction of the flooring. It may help to lay in the flooring after the walls are in and allow about 3/16 inch for expansion and contraction. The gap can be covered with small baseboards. I have used 1/2 x 3 furring strips attached to the wall with a bit of PL (liquid nails) and 3/4 inch finish/trim nails. It also gives a finished homey look. They can be prepainted outside the bus. Then installed and a quick touch up over the nails with paint.
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Old 02-25-2018, 12:40 PM   #8
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If you want water proof floors I have a better option for you

Look up a product called advantex
Itís cheap, easy to get, and easy to work with
Itís a subfloor product
And itís 100% water proof

Iíve been using it for years
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Old 02-25-2018, 12:56 PM   #9
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If you want a waterproof floor why not put down a big continuous roll of linoleum? Instead of trimming the floor covering to the edge of the floor, allow the flooring to ride up the wall about 4". That will keep any spilled liquids from getting under your flooring.
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:37 PM   #10
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A metal floor is waterproof. You just need to mitigate sweating/condensation. That can be accomplished by using marine grade plywood over a well coated metal surface ( i.e. rustproof the metal first.)
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:56 PM   #11
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Pressure treated plywood causes accelerated corrosion of any steel fasteners in contact with the wood. I would hesitate using it in a bus.

http://www.ggashi.com/wordpress/wp-c...-Corrosion.pdf

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Old 02-26-2018, 08:58 PM   #12
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Roger that. Pressure treated, especially the new stuff, eats metal. Even requires specially treated fasteners. Marine ply...no problemo.
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Old 02-26-2018, 09:26 PM   #13
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I working with a coach so mine doesnt have the metal floor.

I have plywood and then vinyl flooring to remove but on some areas like the luggage bays the plywood is open to the bays underneath.

I was thinking maybe just truck bed liner them from underneath and seal it that way?
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Old 02-26-2018, 09:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rberriz View Post
If you want water proof floors I have a better option for you

Look up a product called advantex
Itís cheap, easy to get, and easy to work with
Itís a subfloor product
And itís 100% water proof

Iíve been using it for years
Have you been using it in buses?

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Old 02-26-2018, 09:39 PM   #15
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Have you been using it in buses?

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No in houses, but I donít see how it would be any different.
Itís 4x8 sheets 3/4Ē thick
Completely impervious to water
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Old 02-27-2018, 05:19 PM   #16
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No in houses, but I donít see how it would be any different.
Itís 4x8 sheets 3/4Ē thick
Completely impervious to water
Are we talking about Advantech? Supposedly waterproof OSB? There's a guy who builds houses has a YouTube channel named Matt Risinger who swears by the stuff. I watch him, so I've heard of it. No opinion either way.
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Old 02-27-2018, 06:03 PM   #17
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Are we talking about Advantech? Supposedly waterproof OSB? There's a guy who builds houses has a YouTube channel named Matt Risinger who swears by the stuff. I watch him, so I've heard of it. No opinion either way.


YES thatís the stuff
Itís truly amazing stuff
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