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Old 04-08-2017, 12:32 PM   #1
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Post Question regarding windows

Hi, I've been stalking this website for months, and researching etc. prior to our build. We will be getting our bus on Monday

Once we have the bus and begin our project, I really want to clean up the metal around the windows. Its dull, and not shiny (of course). I have scoured the site, and I've only seen a few people remove their windows, but haven't seen anyone take out the windows to clean the frames, or to repaint them etc.

Has anyone done this? Am I insane to even WANT to do this? Please share your thoughts.

Michele
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Old 04-08-2017, 12:42 PM   #2
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I took all my windows out, cleaned them and resealed them. It was super easy as they are held in by two screws on each side (left/right). Removing the old butyl sealant was the worst part but I used scrapers to get 95% and solvent to get the rest. it went well enough. I resealed them with butyl sealant, and a urthane type sealant for the bottom panel. I did my windows so I could pull them back out in the future, I intend to cover some of the windows when I start to convert the bus.

I did what I did as some were were leaking and I wasnt ready to convert yet. Needed to buy some time and I'm glad I did it.

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Old 04-08-2017, 04:36 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jctrembly View Post
I took all my windows out, cleaned them and resealed them. It was super easy as they are held in by two screws on each side (left/right). Removing the old butyl sealant was the worst part but I used scrapers to get 95% and solvent to get the rest. it went well enough. I resealed them with butyl sealant, and a urthane type sealant for the bottom panel. I did my windows so I could pull them back out in the future, I intend to cover some of the windows when I start to convert the bus.

I did what I did as some were were leaking and I wasnt ready to convert yet. Needed to buy some time and I'm glad I did it.

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Could they be reinstalled upside down?
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Old 04-08-2017, 04:41 PM   #4
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Lol, I could see how that would be neat. But No, not on an AmTran/International. I remember a lip somewhere that would prevent that. While your doing the windows it's also good time to look at the plastic slides that are used to lock the windows. I had about 10 or so that were pretty worn and wouldn't keep the window shut. They where pretty cheap. I found them online somewhere.

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Old 04-08-2017, 10:57 PM   #5
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Could they be reinstalled upside down?
Not without a good bit of time, money, and/or effort invested.

As jctrembly alluded to, there's a lip built into the bus that keeps the bottom of the window from kicking inward and lips built into the top and sides of the window that keep it from kicking outward.

You would need to reverse engineer the window hole to have the lip at the top to keep the window from kicking inward. Unless maybe you're able to just drop it in upside down and rely on the screws and clips to hold it in place all the way around. I'll check that out next time I'm working in my bus.
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Old 04-12-2017, 08:31 AM   #6
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How cool would that be!? I'm gonna have to look at that. I would love to open them from the bottom.

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Old 04-12-2017, 08:46 AM   #7
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I just thought about something. Two things, actually.

First, as the windows were originally installed, the upper half of the window sits outboard of the lower half. If the windows were flipped upside down, it might become basically impossible to keep rainwater out.

Second, I seem to remember buses that I rode as a kid having windows that didn't lock in the "up direction". When you went to close them, you just pushed up on them and stopped pushing after the audible "click" that corresponded with the height you wanted the window to rest at. Then to lower the window again, you had to pull the latches in. If you flipped the windows over, the latches would work backwards. You would have to pull the latches to move the windows up (which would still be opening them), but then they would just freefall back closed.
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Old 04-12-2017, 05:32 PM   #8
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To follow up...

I went out and looked at my windows today. The latch mechanisms on my windows do indeed provide a positive lock in both directions, so mine wouldn't fall closed if mounted upside down. Not sure if others might have that problem, or if my memory of bus windows dating back 25 years ago was wrong.

It looks like it wouldn't take too terribly much work re-engineering and cutting the edges of the window to get it to mount in the existing hole upside down.

My thought about keeping rainwater out however, does appear to be a very real concern. The only "seal" between the upper and lower halves of the window appears to be a whisker strip. First good storm, I think you'd seriously regret flipping them.
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Old 04-12-2017, 09:16 PM   #9
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Obviously someone with a food truck has figured out how to flip a window because the converted bus food trucks serve food from the lower half of the bus window. It's simple, all we have to do is disassemble someone's food truck/bus.

Even for regular skoolies it would be nice to sit and be able to see out the open window at face level. In blowing wind or while traveling in wet weather I'd expect a flipped window to leak like a colander, and I don't have that many towels.
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