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Old 09-09-2016, 01:26 PM   #21
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 4,290
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International S3800
Engine: DT360
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
true business insurance for a vehicle is different than the progressive commercial vehicle for personal use that alot of us are using for our busses... that policy is just a glorified personal auto policy that was expanded to allow non-traditional vehicles to be insured like daily drivers..

the OP's bus is going to be used for a real legitimate business so they need real business insurance.. and a few hundred bucks a month isnt out of the realm...

I looked into it for mine when i was told a "mobile software lab" would be a busioness.. however the lawyers said my use was no different than a guy sitting in his pickup truck working on his laptop since the bus is in my name and i dont actively sell or solicit business from it..

-Christopher
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Old 09-10-2016, 08:34 AM   #22
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Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Salt Lake City, Ut
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Year: 98
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: D
Engine: 7.2L turbo Cat C7 3126
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This is an older picture, but it shows the concept:



I built a deck on top of the original bus roof, then added a short stationary wall around the deck. I built a second roof out of wood, then covered it with sheet metal. I also built too large movable walls and attached them to the new roof. 4 aluminum server rack C channels hold the walls in place. On each side, there is an electric winch which pulls the walls up from the bottom.

The winches were controlled with wireless remotes, but the movements were not super precise so I took them apart and rewired them so I could control them manually with large switches. That's where I am right now, I will post new pictures once that project is finished. Also, I will post photos of the piano-hinge walls that fold into place to cover the large holes created when the roof is raised.



Our tiny home blog:
TheBigBusTheory.wordpress.com
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Old 09-10-2016, 08:58 AM   #23
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 5,077
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
Cool. Reminds me a bit of the jack-up roof RV that Henry Ford built back in the 1930's.
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:30 AM   #24
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
Posts: 2,133
Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
I'm still kicking myself for not buying back my travel trailer from the insurance company.... After I laid it over in a 6' ditch!

It HAD EVERYTHING I need right now!!!
Slide mounts/tracks, motors, fridge, electric control panel, ducted a/c, lights, oven, windows, and a gazillion more parts!

Propane tanks, regulator, awning, furnace....even hydraulic pistons to lift the bed for storage You name it
Holding tanks, plumbing, shower, toilet, mirrors...
I could keep adding to list

Internet pic
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Old 12-16-2016, 03:57 PM   #25
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Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Cheyenne wy
Posts: 90
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Thomas
Engine: 8.3 cumnins
https://youtu.be/lEyVdJtsR2o

Has anyone seen this?
It has some faults for sure, I would have done a big 4x4 steel square to weld into where he notched the frame, that scares me. And the 1/2" bolts holding the bearings don't seem like it would be beefy enough. I'm not sure what ever came of this. The guy has 3 vids then nothing. Don't know if he gave up or what. He does do a podcast but I wasn't willing to listen to him talk for hours to find out if he ever mentions his slides.

Full disclaimer: I probably will not do slides on my bus.. Unless I find out it's pretty easy and straight forward. I probably won't even do a roof raise, but if I was going to do slides I'd go ahead and do the roof raise. I've seen a few on this site but doesn't seem that common. It would be great to have some more living room/dining room space and to not feel so squished. It's a tempting project... But do you think the above video is onto something or is he way off the mark?

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Old 12-16-2016, 04:02 PM   #26
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Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Cheyenne wy
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Year: 1992
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Engine: 8.3 cumnins
Oh and Vlads slideout looks amazing so far. I skimmed it but need to go back through with a fine tooth comb and make sure I understand what all is entailed.
If (big if) I do decide to do a slide I probably wouldn't go aluminum like his just sheet steel for ease of welding. I'm still not 100% sure how his mechanisms work and involve skate board wheels and all that. If it could have the main bars below and near the frame like the video I posted it may be easier. Idk. Just dreaming for now, but within the next few week I need to actually decide how far I want to take things with this 40 ft bus sitting in my driveway. Trying to decide if I want to keep it fairly straightforward and get it done in 8 months or so or go all out and have something amazing in 2 years or so

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Old 12-16-2016, 04:39 PM   #27
Bus Nut
 
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Prince George, BC, Canada
Posts: 280
Year: 1974
Coachwork: Blue bird
Chassis: CHEVROLET C60
Engine: 350 ci on propane
Rated Cap: 48
I work in the RV industry and most RV slide outs are wooden / aluminum frame boxes on large steel drawer slides. The slides are fastened to the frame with a subfloor that slides over the main floor. They use long electric linear actuators to move them in and out.
Gordon

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Old 12-16-2016, 05:55 PM   #28
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 82
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Ward/Amtram
Chassis: International 36ft
Engine: DT466 w/ Allison MT643
Notching the frame is a no-no.... big time
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Old 12-16-2016, 06:24 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalez View Post
Notching the frame is a no-no.... big time
Ya I'd say if anything notch and thoroughly weld a large 4x4 super thick heavy duty square tube in the notch. I would think that filling that cut-out with something really beefy wouldn't hurt at all. But if it can be avoided then I would.
But the rest of the design seems pretty decent and glides easily.
Just a thought. It's hard to find too many with real diagrams or something showing how it's done properly.

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Old 12-16-2016, 08:48 PM   #30
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 82
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Ward/Amtram
Chassis: International 36ft
Engine: DT466 w/ Allison MT643
If I remember right, most on this forum have said you shouldnt even weld near the top or bottom of the frame, because it'll weaken the metal and the bus will break it and sag.
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