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Old 06-02-2019, 04:39 PM   #1
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Roof raise (no welding)

Hi guys,
Has anyone raised their roof using screws and a custom fabricated extension that fits over where the cut has been made? I recently saw a video and wanted to get some opinions.
Thanks
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Old 06-02-2019, 04:42 PM   #2
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I'd like to see a video of how well it held up after several ten-thousands of miles...
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Old 06-02-2019, 04:42 PM   #3
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Sounds expensive and labor intensive. Nothing is easier than welding it together.
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Old 06-02-2019, 05:24 PM   #4
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You're gonna wanna weld that sucker and do it right if you're expecting any semblance of structural integrity both with regards to rollover integrity and longevity as Haz.Matt.1960 mentioned. Additionally, if you don't do a solid job and document how you did it I would guess you're going to invite even more challenges finding insurance for it. Among other factors, roof raises are one of the reasons most insurers don't want to touch skoolies and doing it half-assed is a disservice to the entire community.
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Old 06-02-2019, 05:36 PM   #5
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Good points, all. I pondered on the weakening of integrity, but was more interested in how far down the road it would get before becoming the first Skoolie convertible with an automatic retraction system!
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Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
You're gonna wanna weld that sucker and do it right if you're expecting any semblance of structural integrity both with regards to rollover integrity and longevity as Haz.Matt.1960 mentioned. Additionally, if you don't do a solid job and document how you did it I would guess you're going to invite even more challenges finding insurance for it. Among other factors, roof raises are one of the reasons most insurers don't want to touch skoolies and doing it half-assed is a disservice to the entire community.
So, half-assed? Does that mean it'd go slower than fast, but faster than slow..?
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Old 06-02-2019, 06:10 PM   #6
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Sounds like more work, to be less effective. Welding is easy enough to learn the basics. After I set the machine, I've had novices MIG welding in 5 minutes. Rent a welder for a week, practice a little, and weld her up!
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:31 PM   #7
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Sounds great. Just wanted to get a feel for what people were saying. Thanks for the input.
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Old 06-03-2019, 07:00 AM   #8
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Sorry to say but doing stuff like that is probably the main reason why insurance companies are dropping skoolies...
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Old 06-03-2019, 11:21 AM   #9
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Yes, I had a local sheet metal shop make custom hat channel for me. It fit over the factory stuff like a glove. I raised my roof at floor level, ie rather than cutting any ribs, I removed the rivets that secured the ribs to the chair rail. Most ribs were held to the chair rail by four 1/4" solid rivets (Blue Bird). I sized the hat channel extensions to lap over the original hat channel by about the same height as the chair rail, and secured the extension to the original ribs again using four 1/4" rivets. Likewise to secure the extension to the chair rail through the original holes.


Even those most of my raise was done with rivets, I did find plenty of occasions for a little buzz from the MIG welder here and there.
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Old 06-03-2019, 12:32 PM   #10
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I believe a bolted section can be more than adequate for our needs. The only reason I wouldn't do it is due to labor involved when welding it is so much easier. Insurance doesn't know how I did my raise when I get insured. And I bet not one example of a failure from going this route can be posted.
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