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Old 05-16-2019, 01:02 PM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central Connecticut
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Year: 1992
Coachwork: international
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That was invaluable. Does the tip attach fairly easily to most pressure washers?
Do you have any recommendations on where to get the sand? And finally what type/ brands of paint do you use? Is it applied with a brush or sprayer? It looks like I’ll be doing the work in 1 week phases
1. Power wash and see the lay of the land
2. Wet sand blasting (thanks for steering me in right direction).
3.using the ospho (how much for a 40 ft bus)
4.Then painting

Is it safe to say essentially ospho and paint everything that is metal? I’m very new.
Thanks you SO much for the insight
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Old 05-16-2019, 04:14 PM   #12
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
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Engine: mechanical DT466
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Ewo,
Question about the wet pressure washing.
So I will need:
The pressure washer
The northern tool kit
Filtered sand
Where does the sand draw from so I need an actual sandblaster as well?

On a different note. I was planning on pressure washing underneath before I did anything. Do you feel thatís an unnecessary step? Should I just do the wet sand blasting and save the time?
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Old 05-16-2019, 04:43 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetireddad View Post
Ewo,
Question about the wet pressure washing.
So I will need:
The pressure washer
The northern tool kit
Filtered sand
Where does the sand draw from so I need an actual sandblaster as well?

On a different note. I was planning on pressure washing underneath before I did anything. Do you feel thatís an unnecessary step? Should I just do the wet sand blasting and save the time?
you don't need to pressure wash first - you should be able to purchase the sand at the tool rental where you rent the pressure washer and the attachment that allows the sand to become part of the water stream - get the operator of the tool rental to go over the operation of the equipment with you - once you know how to set everything up, a half hour of practice will have you blasting like a pro
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetireddad View Post
Ewo,
Question about the wet pressure washing.
So I will need:
The pressure washer
The northern tool kit
Filtered sand
Where does the sand draw from so I need an actual sandblaster as well?

On a different note. I was planning on pressure washing underneath before I did anything. Do you feel thatís an unnecessary step? Should I just do the wet sand blasting and save the time?
The wet blaster will use vacuum to suck sand up it's own tube to mix with the water as it comes out. As long as the tube is in the media it will suck it up.
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Old 05-17-2019, 01:51 AM   #15
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Has anyone used crushed walnut shells as a blasting media?


Pros/cons?
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Old 05-17-2019, 08:12 AM   #16
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Miami, Fl.
Posts: 67
Year: 1999
Chassis: Amtran / International
Engine: DT466E-Md3060
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetireddad View Post
Ewo,
Question about the wet pressure washing.
So I will need:
The pressure washer
The northern tool kit
Filtered sand
Where does the sand draw from so I need an actual sandblaster as well?

On a different note. I was planning on pressure washing underneath before I did anything. Do you feel thatís an unnecessary step? Should I just do the wet sand blasting and save the time?

Tireddad,

The Northern tool sandblast tip basically screws onto the pressure washer wand, easy peasyÖ.

As far as where to get the sand/media.

If you do not have a local sandblast media supply company where you are at then try going to where they might sell tile, paver bricks.

Many times these supply chains will have masons sand or paver sand that is filtered.
Do not worry so much on grit size but do try to stay in between fine and coarse, no coarse media as it might plug up the tip of the blast adapter.

As far as how much should you buy ??? 200 lbs at a bare bones minimum. Any left over you can use for other blast projects.

Please let us know how it all works out for you at the end.

Also, please edit your user profile to show where you are from, Thanks and good luck.
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Old 05-17-2019, 08:27 AM   #17
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
Has anyone used crushed walnut shells as a blasting media?


Pros/cons?
Too much of an open ended question my friend.
Each and every blast media type will give you different results based on the methods, equipment and techniques the operator utilizes.

Walnut shells is great for cleaning wood surfaces, removing paint from surfaces where you do not want much, if any, of a profile.

Some examples of this wood be log cabin, cleaning or removing of paint and stains of wood, doors or removing paint from say, a corvette or other sensitive exotics.
Antique furniture restoration, aluminum or non ferrous metals.

Another great place to utilize crushed walnut shells is for the removal of anti fouling paint from a boat bottom.

Used outside of a blast cabinet you cannot reclaim and reuse due to contamination of the media by the surface material you just blasted off.

Used within a blast cabinet you can reclaim and reuse if you utilize a cyclone type of dust collector.

Cons for me, media is quite pricey, upto $40-$50 a bag for a 50lb bag here in Miami.

I get the same results using a 50/140 (#7) grit sand when I blast wet. The cost of sand is only $6 for a 50 lb bag.

also you cannot blast crushed walnut with a wet slurry blaster such as mine or even the DB (green) machines that are heavily advertised on tv car shows.

You can blast it wet if you use a water ring on a dry setup but you cannot reclaim and recycle cause once it gets wet it is useless, becomes soggy just like a spitball!

For doing general homeowner style blast work, crushed glass/sand and a pressure washer will give you adequate results without breaking the bank.

Once you get into the special medias you will need to upgrade equipment and costs will go up with that too..


Here's a link that can explain things much better than I.

https://compomat.com/walnut-shell-bl...AaAkmSEALw_wcB
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Old 05-17-2019, 10:20 AM   #18
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Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 1,008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
Has anyone used crushed walnut shells as a blasting media?


Pros/cons?
as others have explained, walnut shells are not suitable for blasting rusty steel - they are more for gentle cleaning softer surfaces - ( art restoration experts go so far as to blast with talcum powder to clean up valuable paintings and antiques )
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:11 AM   #19
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ewo1 View Post
Too much of an open ended question my friend.
Here's a link that can explain things much better than I.

https://compomat.com/walnut-shell-blast-media/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwt_nmBRD0ARIsAJYs6o28ryo.mk06Tujrxap 7Dv-GZYhk45gW3RSlIjmDix3cCp1uADS0D7pYkAaAkmSEALw_wcB

Thank you very much for your detailed reply!


... and thank you for the link!
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:15 AM   #20
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 483
Year: 2002
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Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleddgracer View Post
as others have explained, walnut shells are not suitable for blasting rusty steel - they are more for gentle cleaning softer surfaces - ( art restoration experts go so far as to blast with talcum powder to clean up valuable paintings and antiques )
That explains a lot. My father is restoring a 1967 Datsun roadster. He brought the body into a blasting shop and they used walnet shells. Now I know it was because the metal was too thin to handle anything more abrasive.
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