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Old 08-20-2016, 05:55 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Battle Creek, MI
Posts: 28
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Engine: 5.9 Diesel Cummins
Self-sealing membrane under subfloor?

What are the thoughts on a self-sealing membrane like "ice & water" under the subfloor, directly on the metal floor before furring strips, rigid insulation or spray foam, and then the plywood?

My thought is, every morning I notice a RIDICULOUS amount of condensation on my floor and ceilings (everything is gutted). While this likely has a LOT to do with the fact that there is no insulation, I still wonder what the longterm effect of that condensation will be on furring strips laid on the floor even if they are fastened to the sides of the bus instead of through the belly of the bus (which I'm not doing).

"Ice and Water" SEEMS like it would make a lot of sense in terms of sealing out "anything" that would try to sneak up through the metal floor through condensation, but am I missing something?

Working on a big metal can has really opened my eyes to what can happen over time with things like water and moisture and i'mw ant to seal against it as well as possible.

I know i know... i'm not going to have this conversion for 50+ years, but i'd sure like it to last like I am.
lanegordon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2016, 12:29 AM   #2
Site Team
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 655
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 RE
Engine: 8.3l Cummins
Rated Cap: 78
On the bluebird I got, the water is designed to run along the skin and into the wall channel between the chair rail and outer skin, theoretically keeping the moisture outside of the cabin.

I had tons of condensation before I added insulation. Once all the insulation was in place, I did not have any condensation issues.

The only time it gets humid is if the heat is off, everyone is in the bus (family of 6) no ventilation or heating is running and its cold outside (in the high 30s farahenheit or less)

Add some heat or air movement and its a non issue again.

So, insulate!
Quote:
Originally Posted by lanegordon View Post
What are the thoughts on a self-sealing membrane like "ice & water" under the subfloor, directly on the metal floor before furring strips, rigid insulation or spray foam, and then the plywood?

My thought is, every morning I notice a RIDICULOUS amount of condensation on my floor and ceilings (everything is gutted). While this likely has a LOT to do with the fact that there is no insulation, I still wonder what the longterm effect of that condensation will be on furring strips laid on the floor even if they are fastened to the sides of the bus instead of through the belly of the bus (which I'm not doing).

"Ice and Water" SEEMS like it would make a lot of sense in terms of sealing out "anything" that would try to sneak up through the metal floor through condensation, but am I missing something?

Working on a big metal can has really opened my eyes to what can happen over time with things like water and moisture and i'mw ant to seal against it as well as possible.

I know i know... i'm not going to have this conversion for 50+ years, but i'd sure like it to last like I am.
aaronsb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2016, 10:09 AM   #3
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Miami
Posts: 151
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: MVP
Engine: CAT 3116
Rated Cap: 84
When I gutted my bus I was getting a ton of condensation each morning. After I insulated it, I haven't had any.
Piersg is offline   Reply With Quote
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