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Old 05-05-2017, 08:03 PM   #1
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Sheep's wood insulation in a fiberglass bus... questions!

Hey y'all,

Finally ripped off the last of our ceiling panels and tore out the last of the insulation. Our bus body is FIBERGLASS so there was minimal rust (with the exception of a few metal bars which we repaired or replaced). Next steps!

I want to use sheep's wool for various reasons (non-toxic, sound deadening, sustainable) and will have a 1/4" plywood and cork flooring on top of that. My question is... do I need to include a vapor barrier? The metal ribs will be coated with flex seal/rubberized sealant.... fiberglass doesn't rust... wool will hold water but increase in R value... cork is mold and water resistant. Should there be a vapor barrier to protect the sheep's wool or does it not matter since fiberglass doesn't rust and cork is water/mold resistant.

PLEASE HELP!!!


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Old 05-05-2017, 08:24 PM   #2
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For longevity I'd skip the organics in the floor. You can't avoid spills and humidity.
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Old 05-05-2017, 09:47 PM   #3
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ANY organic insulation you use is eventually going to get nasty and moldy.
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Old 05-21-2017, 01:25 PM   #4
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Have you found a wool insulation source SunnyLordh? I'm really interested in going this route as well. Would love to hear what
you've found / how it's going, if you're willing to share.

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Old 05-21-2017, 01:45 PM   #5
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Here's some information;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wool_insulation

Sheep Wool Insulation

Good Shepherd Wool | Wool Insulation

Black Mountain 16" Natural Sheep Wool Insulation - Eco-Building Products

Sheep Wool insulation Black Mountain USA

Oregon Shepherd – Natural Wool Insulation

https://evanandgabbystinyhouse.wordp...ol-insulation/

Thermafleece | The Original Wool Insulation

https://www.builddirect.com/blog/eco...n-sheeps-wool/



Pros and Cons of Sheep Wool Insulation

Pros and Cons of Sheep Wool Insulation - PM on Renewables

https://ntenvironmentalwork.net/2011...ol-insulation/

https://www.thegreenage.co.uk/is-she...tant-to-moths/

The thermal resistance or R-value of sheep's wool batts is about R-3.5 per inch, similar to other fibrous insulation types.


There's a lot of information available. It doesn't make sense to me to use a breathable organic insulation when the purpose is to stop air flow. Am I looking at this wrong?
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Old 05-30-2017, 11:46 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
Here's some information;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wool_insulation

Sheep Wool Insulation

Good Shepherd Wool | Wool Insulation

Black Mountain 16" Natural Sheep Wool Insulation - Eco-Building Products

Sheep Wool insulation Black Mountain USA

Oregon Shepherd Natural Wool Insulation

https://evanandgabbystinyhouse.wordp...ol-insulation/

Thermafleece | The Original Wool Insulation

https://www.builddirect.com/blog/eco...n-sheeps-wool/



Pros and Cons of Sheep Wool Insulation

Pros and Cons of Sheep Wool Insulation - PM on Renewables

https://ntenvironmentalwork.net/2011...ol-insulation/

https://www.thegreenage.co.uk/is-she...tant-to-moths/

The thermal resistance or R-value of sheep's wool batts is about R-3.5 per inch, similar to other fibrous insulation types.


There's a lot of information available. It doesn't make sense to me to use a breathable organic insulation when the purpose is to stop air flow. Am I looking at this wrong?
Sorry for the delay... Thank you soooooo much for all this ! Much appreciated.

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Old 05-30-2017, 01:05 PM   #7
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There's a lot of information available. It doesn't make sense to me to use a breathable organic insulation when the purpose is to stop air flow. Am I looking at this wrong?
So the condensation can dry without molding? I dunno. From having to work with fiberglass insulation I bet it's a hell of a lot better to work with than the standard batting stuff.
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Old 05-30-2017, 02:12 PM   #8
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Agreed, most people would rather handle wool than to handle glass batts. I don't know much about wool, but it is organic. Organic materials break down over time. It must decompose over time since you never hear about antique sweaters.

It seems to be dust accumulation in combination with moisture that allows mold to grow in fiberous insulation. Is wool any different functionally? I'd expect to see the same problems with dust accumulation and possible mold growth over time. Can an organic material work better than glass batts? I'm certainly not impressed with the glass batts.

Buses are plagued with unavoidable moisture or humidity issues unless you live in the desert. Displacing the humid air and sealing off metal surfaces was the goal of my chosen insulating material.

I've certainly made a lot of mistakes while building this bus, but I'll be much better educated for the next bus.
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Old 05-30-2017, 02:41 PM   #9
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Agreed, most people would rather handle wool than to handle glass batts. I don't know much about wool, but it is organic. Organic materials break down over time. It must decompose over time since you never hear about antique sweaters.

It seems to be dust accumulation in combination with moisture that allows mold to grow in fiberous insulation. Is wool any different functionally? I'd expect to see the same problems with dust accumulation and possible mold growth over time. Can an organic material work better than glass batts? I'm certainly not impressed with the glass batts.

Buses are plagued with unavoidable moisture or humidity issues unless you live in the desert. Displacing the humid air and sealing off metal surfaces was the goal of my chosen insulating material.

I've certainly made a lot of mistakes while building this bus, but I'll be much better educated for the next bus.
I only know about wool clothing and hiking gear. "Cotton kills" is the phrase. You get cotton wet and the temp drops and you are ROYALLY screwed. Wool keeps 60% of its insulation even when wet. The clothing is anti microbial treated so it takes a week for you to smell like wholesale as$ instead of 3 days. Since you aren't wearing this stuff they could go hogwild on the treating.

As for how long wool takes to break down, is it really an issue? You and I are going to be ready for the nursing home in 30 yrs. Maybe the 20 somethings on here need to build a bus that will last 50 yrs but are they even going to last that long without ripping the bus apart or starting over with a different bus?
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Old 05-30-2017, 02:58 PM   #10
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Hey, this bus is my nursing home. I'd be shocked if I have another 30 years to go, but who knows?

Ok, now I'm going to make yarn from insulation for a nonmicrobial wool sweater. That's right after I learn to card wool and spin it into yarn. Then I just have to learn to knit. Easy peazy.
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