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Old 06-24-2015, 03:06 PM   #1
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Question Should I Weigh Down the back? (reduce bumpyness

I was thinking that if I add alot of weight to the back of the bus, so It wont be as bumpy?

Any suggestions for reducing bumpyness?
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Old 06-24-2015, 05:40 PM   #2
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New shocks will really help.
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Old 06-25-2015, 01:12 AM   #3
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More info on what bus, ect so we can help you pls.

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Old 06-25-2015, 10:09 AM   #4
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There has been a fair amount of discussion here regarding the "harsh ride" that most skoolies deliver. Most of which is due to the fact that the springs are rated to handle a complete, full load of overweight school kids. Some have shocks which helps with rebound, but many have none at all.

About the only way to soften the ride is to reduce the spring rate which can really only be accomplished one of two ways...A., remove a few leafs...B., Get new springs that match your new rolling weight.

There are lots of local & national companies that can fab springs to just about any specs, so while obviously more costly, it is not prohibitively so.

Removing leafs is a hit or miss proposition and can either work or create new issues. That topic has also been discussed here.

Either way, good quality shocks can improve the feel of the ride by simply dampening rebound which accounts for part of the "bouncyness".

I had new springs made to match both the new weight AND it's new distribution. Putting a heavy diesel where a little straight six used to be drmatically alters how much weight is where. To get a decent ride, you will have to do something similar by estimating your total gross wet weight, and where is is roughly centered.

Getting your actual weight for each wheel and front to rear is a good start.
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Old 06-25-2015, 01:41 PM   #5
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Maybe install all the black/grey/fresh water tanks behind the rear axle? I'd also put heavy stuff like the generator or battery bank behind the rear axle if I could.

On a RE bus I wouldn't be worried about this, obviously. Dognose FEs are a different matter although they aren't terrible if you have a full tank of gas.
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Old 06-25-2015, 01:47 PM   #6
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I'm centering as much weight a I can between the front and rear axles.
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Old 06-25-2015, 03:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIbluebird View Post
Maybe install all the black/grey/fresh water tanks behind the rear axle? I'd also put heavy stuff like the generator or battery bank behind the rear axle if I could.

On a RE bus I wouldn't be worried about this, obviously. Dognose FEs are a different matter although they aren't terrible if you have a full tank of gas.
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I'm centering as much weight a I can between the front and rear axles.
Yeh, I think the heavy weight stuff is best put just forward of the rear axle as opposed to the back of the bus. I'm sure it would take more weight than any of us are putting into the bus to make it do a wheelie, but I get a warm fuzzy feeling knowing that my front wheels are still firmly planted on the road.
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Old 06-25-2015, 03:52 PM   #8
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Yeh, I think the heavy weight stuff is best put just forward of the rear axle as opposed to the back of the bus. I'm sure it would take more weight than any of us are putting into the bus to make it do a wheelie, but I get a warm fuzzy feeling knowing that my front wheels are still firmly planted on the road.
This makes sense, although on a dognose FE you'll be able to get away with a lot of weight over the rear axle because the engine and transmission are both at the very front of the bus. An empty FE will be very nose heavy.

I'd do like the very heaviest things like the generator right in front of the rear axle then stuff like the tanks in the very back.
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Old 06-25-2015, 04:21 PM   #9
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Calculating Commercial Vehicle Weight Distribution & Payload Made Easy - Articles - Safety & Accident - Articles - Work Truck

http://www.midstaterv.com/index.php/...t-distribution


http://www.your-rv-lifestyle.com/rv-weight.html

I like this site-
http://blog.coach-net.com/2015/05/15...-distribution/

Quote:
Driving an RV is like driving a semi-truck when it comes to weight and handling. You’re dealing with a wide and heavy load whose weight alone makes it handle differently than other vehicles you’re used to driving. Motorhomes, as well as travel and fifth-wheel trailers, are very top heavy in nature and very susceptible to side wind forces which can create a unique problem for RVers.

The Balancing Act

Motorhomes are already designed with the proper placement of cabinetry and facilities to effectively balance your rig. When loading your RV, it is very important to keep in mind that proper weight distribution is critical to ensure safe handling. Be sure to evenly space out the weight and cargo within your coach. From fuel, water and propane to towed items, supplies and passengers…everything counts. You’ll appreciate this proper balancing when you try to turn or maneuver your rig in traffic.
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Weight Distribution Tips to Remember

Keep the center of gravity low and set tire pressure appropriately
Keep cargo and weight evenly spaced out
Keep your cargo secure to prevent shifting and sliding around
Use a weight distribution hitch system (for trailers over 5000 pounds)
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Old 06-25-2015, 04:38 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by WIbluebird View Post
This makes sense, although on a dognose FE you'll be able to get away with a lot of weight over the rear axle because the engine and transmission are both at the very front of the bus. An empty FE will be very nose heavy.
I don't see there being any real difference in loading the rear of a RE or a FE (well, except that it'd be difficult to put much load in the back of an RE, unless you're building your bed frame out of concrete). I see it this way:

Dognose buses have their axle around 2/3 of the way back. This is so that the rear axle will carry the brunt of the weight. Even with the engine up front, this produces something like a weight distribution of 40% on the front axle and 60% of the weight on the rear axle (I'm just guessing on these number, btw. Maybe 33% and 66%?).

RE buses typically have their axles closer to evenly spaced from the front and back, but the engine is in the rear. They probably still have the same axle weight distribution as the FE, or at least fairly close.

If you put all the heavy stuff in the rear of an FE or a RE you will change that ratio, reducing the percentage of the weight on the front axle.
The ultimate place to put the heaviest items would be the place that retains the buses intended weight distribution. My guess is that just forward of the rear axle would be the best spot.

Regardless, it probably doesn't matter. The weight of the bus metal far outweighs what we'll be adding, unless you have a jacuzzi in the plans
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