Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-12-2015, 05:00 PM   #41
Bus Nut
 
Zephod_beeblebrox2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Lexington sc
Posts: 482
Year: 1994
Coachwork: carpenter
Chassis: international
Engine: 466dt
Rated Cap: 59
I'd always go for tubing. Way cheaper to use tubing and an ordinary t bar. Had too many ratchets break at inopportune moments.
Zephod_beeblebrox2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 05:39 PM   #42
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
I'd always go for tubing. Way cheaper to use tubing and an ordinary t bar. Had too many ratchets break at inopportune moments.
Sorry, pipe fitter by trade. Real scrap pipe or tool's are not a problem. I was trying to think about what to take on the road and how to use what I have to drop weight? My only other spare hang up is I have the old split rim's so my spares are going to travel with chain and binders in the jack compartment.
NAT-is the compressor capable of pressurizing an empty tire enough to set the bead and get me to a station even if it on the front?
Thanks for the advice
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 05:46 PM   #43
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 539
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: International
Engine: TE 444
Rated Cap: 12
The compressor on the bus will supply 120 psi, but the holding tanks are small and the lines going in and out are small, it will fill a tire but you will probably have to use the ether trick to seat the bead, I used to run a half inch impact wrench off the air supply on the trucks I used to deliver, you just had to wait sometimes for the compressor to refill the tanks
Kubla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 05:59 PM   #44
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Got it thank's. the ether trick no problem even though I watched a man lose his fore arm muscles and I was already thinking about adding an expansion tank with a check valve (from work) if I decide to cut into the air line to make this happen.
Thanks
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 06:00 PM   #45
Bus Nut
 
Zephod_beeblebrox2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Lexington sc
Posts: 482
Year: 1994
Coachwork: carpenter
Chassis: international
Engine: 466dt
Rated Cap: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
Sorry, pipe fitter by trade. Real scrap pipe or tool's are not a problem. I was trying to think about what to take on the road and how to use what I have to drop weight? My only other spare hang up is I have the old split rim's so my spares are going to travel with chain and binders in the jack compartment.
NAT-is the compressor capable of pressurizing an empty tire enough to set the bead and get me to a station even if it on the front?
Thanks for the advice
Split rims? Didn't they go out in the 30s? Are you sure you don't have Detroit rims like this?uploadfromtaptalk1436738284749.jpguploadfromtaptalk1436738386805.jpg
Zephod_beeblebrox2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 06:19 PM   #46
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Yes. Mine are more the square shaped style? I have heard them called a lot of things but the ones on all my company's work trucks the tire mechanics run when they see them and I have to wait for another truck to show up? I and my men can almost do this for them but we always wanted there equipment? Regardless of the lug's it is still a ring drove behind the rim that will jump out at you if ya don't know what you are doing?
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 06:26 PM   #47
Bus Nut
 
Zephod_beeblebrox2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Lexington sc
Posts: 482
Year: 1994
Coachwork: carpenter
Chassis: international
Engine: 466dt
Rated Cap: 59
Start here
Zephod_beeblebrox2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 07:58 PM   #48
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 6,174
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
That's what most people call a "Dayton" type wheel. Not many (if any) still being made. They are hub-centric and can be tricky to mount properly but a lot of old timers & heavy hauler still like'em. Just about all newer trucks come with "Budd" wheels that look and mount more or less like standard auto rims.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 08:48 PM   #49
Bus Nut
 
Zephod_beeblebrox2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Lexington sc
Posts: 482
Year: 1994
Coachwork: carpenter
Chassis: international
Engine: 466dt
Rated Cap: 59
My skoolie comes with them. I don't figure it's possible to switch hubs though budd wheels would be preferable
Zephod_beeblebrox2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 10:37 PM   #50
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,197
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Easier to change your own on the side of the road with daytons.
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.