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Old 04-04-2017, 06:32 PM   #1
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Spray foam is in, now how to deal with thermal bridge of bus ribs....

How did you guys deal with the thermal bridge from the bus ribs before you attached your interior roofing material?

I'd prefer to go with tongue and groove pine on the inside. Should line each rib with a foam or thin wood layer first before affixing the tongue and groove to it?
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Old 04-04-2017, 06:42 PM   #2
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I didn't want my wood interior to touch the ribs so I covered the ceiling with 1/2" styrofoam panels first. The styrofoam panels compressed as I screwed my interior panels to the ceiling making a nice tight fit against the ribs.
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Old 04-04-2017, 06:55 PM   #3
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What type fof screws did you end up using to get through the metal ribs?
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Old 04-04-2017, 07:13 PM   #4
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I first bought self tapping screws but it was taking three screws to get into the ribs because the tips of the screws kept breaking off.
I switched to GRK R4 Multi-Purpose Screws 9x2". Probably not the right screw for this but seemed to work good. What I ended up doing was breaking out two electric hand drills, one with the drill bit and the other with the T-25 driver head.
Yeah, I know. Nobody wants to drill each hole then set the screw, but it goes much faster than the self tapping screws did.
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Old 04-04-2017, 07:30 PM   #5
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yes a foam board between the two is what I did also, well worth the effort.
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Old 04-05-2017, 07:14 AM   #6
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My thought was to attach furring strips to each rib. I've taped off the ribs with duct tape to fit the rib exactly (I learned from your experience Robin97396). Right now, HD has duct tape which is about 1 inch wide. It comes in a package of about 6 rolls. I love it because I don't have to cut down regular duct tape to fit the rib perfectly.
Now I'm ready to spray the foam.

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Old 04-05-2017, 07:42 AM   #7
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The wood will still transfer the heat without something in between. Foam board then furring strips. Then t&g. This also puts a air gap between the t&g and the foam board. Not the only way but it sure stayed cool in Florida. The wood on the ceiling never got above 75. The white roof got in the 105 and the black rib between the windows got to 138.
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Old 04-05-2017, 08:04 AM   #8
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The wood will still transfer the heat without something in between. Foam board then furring strips. Then t&g. This also puts a air gap between the t&g and the foam board. Not the only way but it sure stayed cool in Florida. The wood on the ceiling never got above 75. The white roof got in the 105 and the black rib between the windows got to 138.
Thank you.

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Old 04-05-2017, 09:28 AM   #9
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Last year I stripped out the interior panels and insulation from my bus. Right about that time we got that real hot couple weeks of mid-summer weather. The top of my head was turning red from being in the bus because the roof was so hot. I didn't have a majic ray gun temperature sensor so I don't know how hot the metal was, but I couldn't stand to touch the metal roof with my hand.

The moral of the story is obvious. Don't have bad timing.
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Old 04-05-2017, 10:03 AM   #10
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Foam is good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tobeamiss View Post
My thought was to attach furring strips to each rib. I've taped off the ribs with duct tape to fit the rib exactly (I learned from your experience Robin97396). Right now, HD has duct tape which is about 1 inch wide. It comes in a package of about 6 rolls. I love it because I don't have to cut down regular duct tape to fit the rib perfectly.
Now I'm ready to spray the foam.

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I duct taped the interior of my bus the hard way. I used regular duct tape then went back and trimmed the excess 1/4" stips off the sides of each rib with a razor blade. What a pain. It took me four days just to tape the bus. That's a lot of tape.
As it turns out taping for spray foam doesn't need to be very carefully done. The apparent purpose is simply to have a flat and clean rib surface without a bunch of foam making the rib lumpy. My foam guy sprayed 1 1/2" to 2" deep over the ribs. I had to chisel my way down to the ribs to expose the duct tape on the entire ceiling and walls, then level all the foam between the ribs. That took another eight days of sawing and carving foam. After all the sweating and cussing during the heat of the summer it was well worth all the effort this winter.

Yesterday I finally finished hanging my interior plywood ceiling panels. I still need to box in the wiring bundles that run along the top of the side windows, then finish up around the driver's window. I love the look of the tongue and groove, but I went with plywood as part of keeping this vehicle as the van stated on the title.

Foam is good, and by now all my skinned knuckles have healed up.
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