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Old 10-27-2012, 12:27 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

I'm getting a woodstove installed in my skoolie and I'm trying to wrap my head around the items needed for properly venting the smoke. I have access to kits like these:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...6635_200316635



Though I think I'm best off getting the pieces individually to make sure none of it's too long. One store I saw the adjustable flashing (that goes on the roof) and it actually looked HUGE. I'm somewhat concerned that with the sloping/arching roof that this would stick out. In the diagram, is it just ONE piece of insulated pipe from the bottom (at the chimney adapter) to the top (chimney cap), with everything sliding on the outside of it?

Is there much of a difference between having the pipe go thru the roof versus out a window(frame)? If it went out the window frame, I'd assume it's best to remove the entire window and cover the window frame with sheet metal? Or are there other (safe, sturdy, etc) options?

I've seen 6 inch 'insulated' (double/triple wall) pipe, which is I'm assuming the piece that must be going through the ceiling. Something like:

http://www.ventingpipe.com/duravent-...ength/p1761152



I guess what I'm trying to understand is that this pipe appears to be 6 inch ID, and about 8 inch OD. How does that attach to the 6 inch OD black pipe? Is that what the 'chimney adapter' is for?

Since the roof really is only about 3 inches (I'm guessing) thick, does the insulated pipe have to go through the ceiling? Or does a different piece do that? I only have a 6 inch hole saw and so I'm wondering if a hole that is 8 inches needs to be cut, and if so, how that is usually done?

Also, is there a recommendation for how far a fireproof flooring (brick or stone) should extend in each direction? What material is cheapest? Brick? Paving stone? Tile? Would the tile break? How high should the whole thing be off the floor? 2 inches? 3 1/2?

I saw one recommendation for the walls to be made from fireproof sheetrock (or something), and then maybe a sheet metal wall (corrugated?) with a 1 inch gap to the layer behind it. Is there a recommended # of inches to give the stove space from the side/back walls? My stove is 24x24x24 and so it's pretty big and too much space behind would have it stick out into the aisle. I could honestly only really afford an extra inch or two of space between the stove and the walls.

I was thinking of just getting paving brick or something for the flooring. Would firebrick be a dumb idea (ie retaining the heat being a hazard)? The other option is landscaping pavers. Should something go under the cement layer? Right now I'm keeping the plywood and rubber flooring, so do I add more plywood above the rubber (and also to help make an exterior wood frame, maybe)? Should I mortar the brick? Is metal flooring a bad idea, ie diamond plating? Would that end up being too hot to stand/sit on?

Is there a general guideline for how long the feet need to be (in terms of safety)? I am going to make an angle iron frame and weld the feet onto it and just put the stove box into the angle iron frame. I'm just curious because this adds height to the stove, which affects the stovepipe that I put above the stove.

Most importantly, how far should the fireproof flooring extend beyond the sides that do not have the fireproof walls (I only plan on having two walls, the other two sides will be open)? Should the side with the door have an extra foot or two of flooring? The stove door is about 18 x 18. I plan on having an inlet pipe for fresh air from underneath the vehicle, and so I have to plan how that's attached if there is flooring in the way.
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:07 AM   #2
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

I've also seen this kit:



These are usually more expensive, but I was curious if I could do this instead, out the window. I would probably remove the window entirely and place sheet metal over it, cutting a hole I need for the thimble. The wall area probably would be insulated with the fireproof sheetrock stuff, and then the external "chimney" would use the straps and tee support to secure it to the outside of the bus.

It probably would stick out an extra foot, but I don't know if that's much different than the sideview mirrors anyway.

If I just went up thru the ceiling, would the hole saw and a reciprocating saw work (to do the difference between the 6 inches of the hole saw and the OD of the insulated pipe)? I'm just wanting to make a hole that is as perfect as possible so the pipe is snug.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:29 PM   #3
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

In my Opinion, and ya know what thats like

I would use the example one above (Chimney Cap with spark arrester, Storm Collar, Attic Shield, Flue dampner and triple walled pipe) going straight up and no bends. you could use a small hole saw to allow the Jig saw with a metal cutting blade to fit the Attic shield nice and tight and slide the triple wall pipe through it and place the rain shield on the pipe to keep most of the weather out. One could also use the ceiling support box ( cut down to a couple inches or make one) as a rain catcher with a drain hose to allow what ever rain/snow/moisture to drain out side through the floor or side. I would also seal all the seams and joints with a fire rated sealer to keep down on Co2 leaks.

I had a freestanding fireplace in a home once and towards the end of winter after heavy use, the wood I got was pretty dry and when it took off the bend got cherry red and started a chimney fire. Of course then I didn't think the Creosote build up would happen that fast.

Legal disclamer; this is my non-expert opinion and in no way advocating/advising anyone how to build or design their bus. So those with Attorneys note I have no money/credit as if I did I would by a RV already made and not try to build one the Redneck way.
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:18 PM   #4
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

I just finished welding and testing the stove prototype and I would say I now agree that straight up is probably best. I finished it in the middle of this hurricane and having a pipe that bends out made the smoke want to come into the bus instead of up the flue. The 40mph winds were blowing into/down the flue (it was just a 12" straight + 90 elbow + 12" straight, at least to test the stove).



I'm still an amateur at starting stove fires, and so I still have some skills to gain to get the smoke to go up the flue and not come into the bus. My guess is that the fire needs to be strong enough fairly quickly from the get-go and the door be closed so the smoke has no option but to go up the flue - and then as the stovepipe heats up then it'll draw better and not come into the bus when the door is opened. Anybody else have tips?

I found a lightweight hearth pad to go under the stove, for about $50 at Tractor Supply.... It seems that it can also be used for the side/back walls, so I'll have to see what the underlying material is.

I'm half tempted to just use my 2 or 3 inch hole saw for the ceiling and just use a jig saw or reciprocating saw for the remaining circle. My 6 inch hole saw worked, but the drill got busted in the end (internal gearing?). You have to go real slow on those things. I had two handles on the drill which let me push a bit harder and I think that wasn't a good idea.

It's easy to get discouraged when you're doing something you've never done before, especially when it's risky or a big deal, like a woodstove on a bus.... But so far what's working for me is to just take it one step at a time, starting with a basic prototype of the setup first, do a small trial and error, and then learn from mistakes.... but in a controlled setting where you're not depending upon things too much before you get the kinks out. Plus having a fire extinguisher, welding gloves, and a big pitcher of water is helpful in case of emergency.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:57 PM   #5
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

That is correct doors closed until the flue gets heated then control the fire with doors and flue dampner. You could also use concrete fire rated board on the side/back walls for added safety.

BTW awesome looking fireplace. Hopefully your not rocking and rolling to much in the hurricane, stay safe
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:09 PM   #6
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

Keep your attitude, recognize that "it" is only stuff and can be done over if necessary. The doing, learning and sharing are the important things. Jack
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Old 10-30-2012, 06:59 PM   #7
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

Beautiful job on the stove, Tomas.
My advice to a novice is to build a big fire in it and see what happens. I believe what will happen is you will burn your ass out of the bus. I have found that any stove with a 6" pipe is too big for a bus. I would cut the stove in half and add a 4" pipe.
My stove is 9" wide X 14" deep X 10" high with a 3" pipe. It will burn us out of here if I want that much heat. It uses very small (2" X 8") logs. I think a cord of wood would last for years. It makes it easy to carry a weeks worth of wood when we are on the road and easy to heat the buson what other people would call scraps. It keeps wood for hours. And keeps us roasty toasty. It is not big enough to keep a fire all night but I have found that any stove that will keep a fire all night is too big for use in a bus. Part of the reason my stove is so small is because we insulated as good as we could and we have double pane windows. BUT it is still a bus and they do not hold heat for very long. I put in a forced air heater for those nights when it is toooo cold to go without heat for the night to keep the temperature 50 to 60 or so.
Run a good test before you finish the install.
The damper must come from the outside.
Good luck
Peace
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Old 10-31-2012, 07:45 AM   #8
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

I used to have to wait a couple of hours for my first bus to become warm enough to play guitar in it. I really do like a wood stove. I had one in my first bus. I was in New England.

It is a great feeling to be able to sit in the warmth and play something like this home made instrument. I did not make this instrument. A very creative guy who has a very cool Crown bus made it.

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Old 10-31-2012, 09:07 AM   #9
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

I am looking forward to the warmth of a wood stove. Hopefully just building a small fire in it, the heat will not drive me out... Also have about a 24" square unit (Blaze King "Princess" model) with a 6" stove pipe... Question: Is there any reason a person cannot reduce the pipe to a smaller size ? And still be safe... Also, why 3-wall pipe through a metal bus roof? I am glad I read this, I was planning on using just double wall...
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Old 10-31-2012, 09:33 AM   #10
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Re: Stovepipe / flue and woodstove flooring

Three wall pipe is just a me thought ever since my house flue fire I tend to go one step further. The guys on here may not agree so would tend to go with their thoughts since they have done this before.
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