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Old 12-25-2018, 07:19 PM   #1
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Stucco?

For my cabinet facings, I've jumped from beadboard, to painted plywood, and now thinking about stucco. It would be a very light coat (just enough for coverage), and very low 'nap' for easier cleaning. I've done it in houses, but basements don't travel down dirt roads at 30 mph.

Vibration and humidity swings are my main concerns....anyone tried this?
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Old 12-25-2018, 10:32 PM   #2
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Don't use stucco...just use the spray-on texturing to suit whatever pattern you like.
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Old 12-26-2018, 02:46 PM   #3
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Why would humidity be a concern? Stucco is used on the exterior of homes that get rained on continually with no detrimental issues
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:17 PM   #4
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I would avoid stucco simply because it is so brittle. Same reason I would never use cement or conventional grout anywhere on a vehicle. I would guess that road and engine vibration would take its' toll very quickly.
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Old 12-26-2018, 07:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRandall View Post
Don't use stucco...just use the spray-on texturing to suit whatever pattern you like.
Wasn't even aware of this stuff, but a Google search shows all kinds of textures available....thanks for pointing that out!
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Old 12-26-2018, 07:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
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I would avoid stucco simply because it is so brittle. Same reason I would never use cement or conventional grout anywhere on a vehicle. I would guess that road and engine vibration would take its' toll very quickly.
Agree with your points.

I was hoping maybe someone did this and modified the stucco mixture somehow to make it work....never know 'til you ask.
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Old 12-26-2018, 08:25 PM   #7
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I have used the spray-on texture for several projects...it never goes as far as the claims on the can. Buy twice as much as you think you need.
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Old 12-26-2018, 08:49 PM   #8
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Forget about what works in a house! A bus, like a boat, needs entirely different design and construction criteria - houses don't do 60MPH. Bus conversion interiors need to be lightweight (helps keep the CoG low), able to flex and move a bit, able to expand and contract with changes to temperature and humidity, have easily-cleanable surfaces, and should look bright and airy to help make the interior look as spacious as possible. Stucco isn't really the best for all that!

My overhead cabinets will be framed from aluminum, with non-structural doors and panels made from 1/4" plywood faced with Celtec 1/8" board. Simple, lightweight, VERY strong, easily cleanable, looks good. I'm using the pale grey Celtec on all the interior walls, and it looks good next to the pale pine trim around the windows and next to the aluminum ends of the divider walls.

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Old 01-05-2019, 07:08 PM   #9
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I did a super thin, wide-troweled, stucco inspired finish on my wall between lower and upper cabinets, and above uppers (raise the roof!). I’m very happy with it.
What I did was:
-Covered the wall (this is a wall I framed across 1/3 of the interior width) with 1/8” mahogany (cheap and flat!)
-filled the gap between two sheets with latex caulking.
-used a wide trowel to build up the seam with more caulking (so the crack wouldn’t crack, as the sulking is flexible).
-mixed up a thinset for tile and did a super thin coat over the whole flat of the wall.
-painted it.
I wanted a hand made/troweled type finish, so I made my not-a-pattern-pattern of strokes visible, instead of aiming for flat, which would have been super easy to achieve.
Very happy with it.
It very much looks like a drywall wall, despite being very lightweight, and having subtle texture.
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Old 01-06-2019, 07:47 AM   #10
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Quote:
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I did a super thin, wide-troweled, stucco inspired finish on my wall between lower and upper cabinets, and above uppers (raise the roof!). Iím very happy with it.
.
I KNEW there were too many innovative and creative folks on this site for someone not to have tried this. Thank you for the reply....sounds like it worked out well. Due to the lack of any positive feedback, I decided to go with vinyl tile instead, and have been hip-deep in the installation these last 2 weekends...should finish today or tomorrow. Infinitely more tedious than any of my other options would have been, but I'm really liking the look of it.
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