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Old 07-01-2016, 08:04 PM   #11
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Rated Cap: 47,000lb/38,000lb GVWR
Automatic transfer switches and/or completely isolated manual transfer type circuits are still the way to go unless you want to add more batteries and copper coils to that Inverter.

(That Inverter can't handle the amperage for long enough to start the surge on most compressors; although maybe with higher AWG AC lines.)

...weight of the transformers is key in evaluating a heavy-surge capable Inverter.
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Old 07-01-2016, 08:09 PM   #12
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Rated Cap: 47,000lb/38,000lb GVWR
In my experience the best rule for Inverters/Chargers: If you can pick it up and mount it without a jack or another person it's not meant for running heavy loads continuously and reliably.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:00 PM   #13
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Boy... My memory is not what it use to be....

I addressed the exact same issue when I did my last bus (20+years ago).

As I recall, I placed all of the "inverter" loads on sub panel and placed the inverter inline on the circuit that fed the sub from the main panel.

Upon the loss of shore or genny power the inverter (with transfer) would kick in and support the loads fed from the sub panel.

I am re-reading my own description and I am not sure that I am being clear. Let me see if I can place a picture. It was really a simple installation.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:06 PM   #14
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Boy... My memory is not what it use to be....

I addressed the exact same issue when I did my last bus (20+years ago).

As I recall, I placed all of the "inverter" loads on sub panel and placed the inverter inline on the circuit that fed the sub from the main panel.

Upon the loss of shore or genny power the inverter (with transfer) would kick in and support the loads fed from the sub panel.

I am re-reading my own description and I am not sure that I am being clear. Let me see if I can place a picture. It was really a simple installation.
That's what I was trying to go for thank you!
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:28 PM   #15
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Thank you everybody for your help. Y'all ever have the experiences where you over think something so much that any solutions become Cloudy? Bingo right here

I ended up with this set up: two seperate panels seperating the Air conditioning load!

My first set up is like this. Since this picture I've added two more 225 AH batteries to the equation giving myself 500AH bank.
I've also got 1/0 gauge cables from batteries to inverter. As well as ran a 140 amp smart isolator from start to house batteries. This system will be powered by isolator/solar down the road and will mostly just be charging phones/laptops or George foreman.


I mounted the inlet on the outside for shore power/ genny connect if batteries get low.


I ran 10 gauge Romex from rooftop AC to my back storage area and to a seperate panel box like this:




The storage are will house my cbr600, fishing stuff, and a small woodworking shop for my girls etsy shop. I just got a champion 3100 inverter genny that will be housed back there down the road to run the AC. I was worried about vapor coming through the back into the interior. But after insulating with vapor barrier, spray foamed the cracks, batting insulation and sound deadening board. Plenty of space back there and Windows for ventilation. I did take the advice and put a lawn mower back there and drove down the road.

Heres a picture of the kitchen I'm building since I have posted in awhile. Thank you guys!
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:34 PM   #16
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Sounds like you did a good job of isolating the area but I would still recommend at least a powered exhaust vent (12v) that is wired to run any time the genny is turning. I just hate waking up dead.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:42 PM   #17
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Sounds like you did a good job of isolating the area but I would still recommend at least a powered exhaust vent (12v) that is wired to run any time the genny is turning. I just hate waking up dead.
Like a fantastic vent in the back?
My two ideas where to mount the genny on a shelf next to the window with exhaust pointing out.
Or to weld up a cage on a cart and wheel the genny outside and lock it to the bus at nights.

I did put a C02 alarm inside the bus and inside the storage area too.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:54 PM   #18
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Anything (like a fantastic vent) that will create negative pressure in that area and vented outdoors will help but directing the exhaust outside is definitely better. And if you intend to run it while going down the road...that can create a whole nuther set of issues. Aerodynamics could easily overcome a vent. And if going the re-directed exhaust route, you still need to have it positioned so that it won't get sucked right back inside.

I am putting mine on a small rear deck with an exhaust extension going up just above the rear roof line.

There have been way too many RV deaths associated with both genny & engine exhaust fumes, even in high end, factory built units, so just try to play it as safe as possible.

And the CO2 alarms are a must have. A propane alarm is a good idea too.
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Old 07-03-2016, 04:32 PM   #19
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Anything (like a fantastic vent) that will create negative pressure in that area and vented outdoors will help but directing the exhaust outside is definitely better. And if you intend to run it while going down the road...that can create a whole nuther set of issues. Aerodynamics could easily overcome a vent. And if going the re-directed exhaust route, you still need to have it positioned so that it won't get sucked right back inside.

I am putting mine on a small rear deck with an exhaust extension going up just above the rear roof line.

There have been way too many RV deaths associated with both genny & engine exhaust fumes, even in high end, factory built units, so just try to play it as safe as possible.

And the CO2 alarms are a must have. A propane alarm is a good idea too.
+1

Serious Stuff!! Carbon Monoxide is really a silent killer.

I personally recommend placing the generator outside the living space. I have done a couple of these where we extended the rear bumper and installed something similar to the APU boxes on semi trucks. Or, on the Eagles we place the genny in the engine compartment (rear) and ran the exhaust out next to the bus exhaust.

In all cases exhaust was run well outside of the exterior of the bus and exited to the rear.

I, with very rare exception, do not run the genny while sleeping. Just my cautious nature.

I do recommend an alarm as well. I would suggest a CO monitor as opposed to a CO2 monitor. The first goes off in the presence of Carbon Monoxide as is found in exhaust gasses. The second goes off in the presence of Carbon Dioxide as is found in...... Beer....

I make a little joke but don't be mistaken, CO poisoning is really a serious concern. In lethal concentrations it can still be undetectable.

Be Safe.

S.
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Old 07-04-2016, 11:50 PM   #20
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Tango would this out the window be sufficient? Same precautions as before plus this. I'd make my own but on a time crunch before s trip from FL to Texas.
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