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Old 06-30-2016, 09:48 PM   #1
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Stumped on Rooftop AC

My powering system is:
A 2000 watt, 6000 watt surge for up to 20 seconds AIMs inverter with 70 amp charger built in.
A 140 amp battery isolator between start battery and house batteries with a 225 AH bank at 50%.
300 watts of solar power with smart charge controller.
A 30 amp inlet for shore power on the exterior

What is your guys best way to avoid running my rooftop AC into my breaker box for that system? Or avoiding it's draw going through the inverter?
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Old 06-30-2016, 10:17 PM   #2
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I would plan on letting the AC draw go through the Inverter if at all possible. Some Inverters can sense load current during such things as a compressor starting up and share or balance the load to the batteries from generator if the generator or land-line can't feed load adequately. (Or even be programmed to limit current from AC input and disable/transfer functions when necessary.)

Or... if you have no plans to let AC run from anything but a generator/land-line I would isolate the circuits entirely. You could add a set of automatic transfer switches and configure them to switch loads depending on your needs of multiple load feeds.

...

After re-reading your question; Automatic Transfer Switches from land-line and your Inverter to two separate distribution panels/circuits would be best in your current situation.
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Old 06-30-2016, 10:39 PM   #3
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I'll look into the auto transfer switch. The thing is I thought a 2000 watt inverter with that good of surge should handle the rooftop AC. Start up was fine, but the inverter couldn't handle the cycle after a few minutes.

My theory on seperating the AC entirely is that even on the Airconditoning would be running close to my 2000 watt inverter maximum and would leave little room to use more electronics.

I plan on only using the AC from gen or shore connect. I was going to run the AC line to a 30 amp receptacle box but that would require a "suicide cord" to plug into the gen or shore power. what should I do to run the gen to the AC solely?
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Old 06-30-2016, 11:36 PM   #4
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Use an appropriate extension cord and just plug it into the genny directly?
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Old 06-30-2016, 11:49 PM   #5
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Why do you want to avoid wiring the AC into the breaker box?
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Old 07-01-2016, 12:02 AM   #6
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Because my inverters wired into the breaker box, and at 2000 watts the AC's draw would make it hard to use anything else with air conditioning.
Is there a way to bypass the inverter?
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Old 07-01-2016, 12:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Use an appropriate extension cord and just plug it into the genny directly?
I'd like to but I had purchased this as to solely run the Air conditioning to.


Wiring this would require a double male end cord.
Should I just do a seperate breaker box?
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Old 07-01-2016, 07:52 AM   #8
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im lost.. you want t orun the A/C only on shore power or the generator, correct?

why would the 12 volt inverter even be providing power if the genny is on or the bus is plugged into shore power?

during shore or genny power wouldnt the 120 volt transfer switched have alleviated the inverter so its now just sitting idle? and if your genny isnt running or shore power isnt connected then there is nowhere else to get power for the Air unit But the inverter so it has to go through it then..
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Old 07-01-2016, 12:24 PM   #9
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I'm in the same camp with cadillackid. Unless you want to run the AC off of batteries, then hooking it to the inverter would seem to be a waste.

What kind of AC do you have? You can also look into getting a "soft start" system for the AC that will drop that initial surge down if you want to run it off of the batteries.

Also, 300W and 225aH won't cut it for powering an AC through an inverter.
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Old 07-01-2016, 03:03 PM   #10
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Let me check whether I'm following along: there's a rooftop AC which needs to be hard-wired to somewhere. There's a circuit breaker panel feeding circuits to receptacles and what-not. There's an inverter supplying power to that breaker panel. It's undesirable to wire the AC into the breaker panel because the inverter can't carry that load. Am I on track so far?

First thing that comes to mind is wire the AC into that panel and just don't turn it on while the inverter is supplying the power. If that's inadequate, the next step could be to automate: when the inverter is running, interrupt the thermostat control or power to the AC so that it cannot be turned on (ie install a relay; the more sensible thing would be to have shore power close the relay so that the AC can operate only when shore power is supplied).

For the cord-and-socket style of transfer switch what you need is called a "power inlet." They're used on boats, transfer switches where a portable generator would be temporarily connected, etc. It has male pins instead of a female receptacle; it's the opposite of the RV outlet you pictured above. Return that outlet or install it at the house as a place to plug your shore power cord in.

Here's one other option. Connect the AC directly to the shore power cord. Also connect a transfer switch to the shore power cord; this would provide the link so that the breaker panel can be connected to inverter or shore source.
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