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Old 02-08-2018, 03:23 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Subfloor Fasteners for Aluminum

So i have recently pulled up my subfloor, which were super clean, because the floor of the body is aluminum. I did have some corrosion where carbon steel bolts had been added later (Probably by the school district) so it got me thinking, what type of fasteners should I use for attaching plywood subfloor to the aluminium. The original screws were a square drive with a self taping cutter. They look like black carbon steel, but they may have been coated. The whole interior and exterior floor were coated with asphalt coating.
Just trying to secure the subfloor and avoid galvanic corrosion. Any information would be appreciated.
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:52 PM   #2
Mini-Skoolie
 
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I can't be the only one that has ever had an Aluminum subfloor. am I?
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Old 02-12-2018, 03:17 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarpinedanny View Post
I can't be the only one that has ever had an Aluminum subfloor. am I?
Well, to be safe, you could counter-sink the plywood and use rivets with washers, i suppose.

https://www.hunker.com/12502151/scre...-with-aluminum

How to safely use stainless steel screws in aluminum

Aluminium Corrosion Resistance - Aluminium Design

https://www.anochrome.com/wp-content...012/01/NOF.pdf
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Old 02-12-2018, 03:24 PM   #4
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I am a complete newbie so take this with a grain of salt, but from a lot of the videos I have seen, a lot of folks don't use anything. They basically have a floating floor. Put down wooden strips, in between the insulation then the sub floor on top of it. Most I have seen use tongue and groove flooring for this.

Then their theory is the weight of the cabinets and everything in the bus would hold the floor in place.

I don't know if this is wise or not, just what I have seen some folks do.. I am sure others are more adapt to tell you a better solution.

James
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Old 02-12-2018, 03:54 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by JamieJackson View Post
I am a complete newbie so take this with a grain of salt, but from a lot of the videos I have seen, a lot of folks don't use anything. They basically have a floating floor. Put down wooden strips, in between the insulation then the sub floor on top of it. Most I have seen use tongue and groove flooring for this.

Then their theory is the weight of the cabinets and everything in the bus would hold the floor in place.

I don't know if this is wise or not, just what I have seen some folks do.. I am sure others are more adapt to tell you a better solution.

James
A floating floor works well.

It doesn't really "float", as framing for walls and other items are screwed down through the new floor and into the walls.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:33 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Twigg View Post
A floating floor works well.

It doesn't really "float", as framing for walls and other items are screwed down through the new floor and into the walls.
Best method is floor is screwed down and everything else is secured to horizontal studs attached to ribs. Nothing attached to floor.

At least that's how the pro's do it.
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:08 PM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Best method is floor is screwed down and everything else is secured to horizontal studs attached to ribs. Nothing attached to floor.

At least that's how the pro's do it.
This was exactly my plan, I was just trying to figure what kind of screws were best for wood to aluminum. I am probably going to just use teks with the spex coating. They do not say they are rated for corrosion resistance in aluminum, but it really seems to be the best choice.
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