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Old 05-20-2017, 10:27 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Subfloor layout and insulation ideas?

I'm not quite there yet, still removing the seats. I was wondering if anyone had experience laying a subfloor and what insulation to use, and what they wish they did differently or added more of or less of etc.

I'm also debating on removing the lower tin sides or just drilling wood into it and putting a layer of insulation. Would it be better to just remove the tin?

I'm definitely changing the upper insulation but I'll be honest, I like the metal roofing with the rivets. Does this metal roofing work with better insulation or is like, a wood ceiling better?

Thoughts?
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Old 05-20-2017, 11:30 AM   #2
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Well... most of us have done a subfloor in a bus before. If you've followed any of the threads you can see a variety of ways of treating rust on the steel subfloor. There's any number of ways you could insulate the floor. You're going to get a lot of different opinions on subfloor insulation. Listen to them all and choose what you think fits your needs best.

I don't understand what you mean by tin sides. I'm going to guess that you're talking about the remaining interior wall beneath the chair rail. We don't usually remove that portion of the wall or the chair rail itself because the chair rail is considered integral to the structural integrity of the bus. If that's not what you were talking about please give further details about tin sides.

Pulling all the ceiling and wall panels is what will allow you to insulate. If you expect to experience hot or cold weather, you'll need good insulation to have a chance at being comfortable.

Some people have attempted to put the ceiling panels back up after installing the insulation of their choice. As far as I'm aware nobody has successfully reinstalled their metal ceiling panels. Besides, the sound reverberation changes when you get that metal out to more of a home sound.

If you think about it, putting metal ceiling panels back in the bus is not a good idea considering the thermal conductivity of metal. If it's freezing outside, the temperature will be conducted into the interior of the bus through the ribs and replaced metal ceiling. Most of us insulate between the ribs, then attempt to create a thermal break, either by leaving a small air gap or installing rigid insulation panels so the ribs do not directly contact whatever type of interior ceiling you install. Yes, interior ceilings and walls are frequently wood because it looks so nice. Some use panels and others use boards. Again it's a personal choice about what works best for your circumstances.

It would seem like we all follow the same path toward insulation, but in reality we're all over the board. There are different circumstances for each of us based on location and intended use of the bus. Many of us chase our tails on the subject of insulation trying to decide what works best before beginning the process.

It's good that you want to insulate, and I remember this was about insulating just the floor initially. You won't regret getting good insulation.
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Old 05-20-2017, 12:45 PM   #3
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The tin walls above the seat lip below the windows.

Any advice on the type of flooring? Brand? Foam or rigid for the floors?

I plan on putting some ospho on the floor, paying someone to sandblast the underside, and them putting in rust bullet on both sides. I'm hoping this helps stops the rust or slow it down at least for a few more years. I don't plan on being in a winter setting with this bus, I'll go south around October or November and stay till spring.
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Old 05-20-2017, 01:09 PM   #4
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I'd suggest just cleaning up your floor and treating with ospho followed by a rust inhibitive paint. Beyond that you need to decide how much insulation is necessary for your intended use. If you're putting in deep insulation you'll probably need framing or furring strips to keep the floor firm.

I wouldn't bother spending the money to have someone sandblast underneath the floor. Consider the things the sandblaster could destroy while down there. Some people do have their floors foam insulated from underneath.

My floor is completely uninsulated, even though my walls and ceilings are done. In the sleeping and passenger floor areas of this bus I plan on putting down 1/2" rigid styrofoam insulation followed by 3/4" plywood as a subfloor. I can't afford to lose much height and I'm not convinced I'll need more insulation than that in the lower 48. I also prefer to go south in the near future instead of enduring northern winters.
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Old 05-20-2017, 01:31 PM   #5
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Ok cool, I planned on blasting and treating under because there is a hole in the back left wheel well. It's not big but it is there and why I got the bus cheap. Other than that the under doesn't look half bad, I just don't want to lose the bus to rust holes.
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Old 05-20-2017, 02:58 PM   #6
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If the rust is already there about all you can do is treat and patch it. Even with some rust issues the bus is probably going to last longer than you'll want to keep driving it.

Your job is to prevent water from getting inside the bus through that wheel well. You should be able to clean it up with a wire brush and make some patches to put over the hole.

You'll get a lot more participation on this thread if you post some photos of the issues with your bus.
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Old 05-20-2017, 03:42 PM   #7
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Well my issue sent the hole so much as figuring out how to put a good floor on the bus. I want to do it right =)
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Old 05-20-2017, 04:03 PM   #8
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So clean up the steel floor, treat it with ospho or comparable product, paint it and start laying down a floor.

What you've got to consider is how tall you are compared to the ceiling height in your bus. How much headroom can you afford to lose through insulation in your floor?

My insulated floor thickness will take another 1-1/4". Luckily I'm relatively short.

Keep in mind that when insulating the ceiling you will lose additional headroom, so don't just be thinking about the floor. This has got to do with you not having to duck your head while you walk through your bus after it's insulated.
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Old 05-20-2017, 04:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
So clean up the steel floor, treat it with ospho or comparable product, paint it and start laying down a floor.

What you've got to consider is how tall you are compared to the ceiling height in your bus. How much headroom can you afford to lose through insulation in your floor?

My insulated floor thickness will take another 1-1/4". Luckily I'm relatively short.

Keep in mind that when insulating the ceiling you will lose additional headroom, so don't just be thinking about the floor. This has got to do with you not having to duck your head while you walk through your bus after it's insulated.
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Old 05-20-2017, 05:08 PM   #10
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Well I'm only going to insulate the top to where the steel stops so I shouldn't lose hardly any from the top.

The bottom on the other hand...

I'm 5'8 and I have a good bit if stretch before touching the ceiling, so I think I can splurge a little on the flooring I hope.
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