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Old 05-19-2015, 12:13 PM   #11
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Looking for some advice. We are researching floor coverings and plan to full time in our bus. We where planning on using linoleum until we read about formaldehyde content. I talked with the flooring people at lowes and they said most of there flooring contains small amounts. Really not interested in building a gas chamber to house my family in. Anybody find a good cheap alternative? We looked into cork but really want vinyl planks or linoleum that is safe.

Are you using any OSB in your bus?

Plywood?

Adhesives?

Nat
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:02 PM   #12
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Are you using any OSB in your bus?

Plywood?

Adhesives?

Nat
Yes and im aware of the chemicals in them also. Just seems like there is less info on floor covering.
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:04 PM   #13
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Husky 7.5 ft. x 17 ft. Diamond Grey Universal Flooring-HK70DT717SGRHD - The Home Depot

I talked to the manufacturer of this flooring made in USA formaldehyde free and asbestos free
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Old 05-20-2015, 01:48 AM   #14
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Yes and im aware of the chemicals in them also. Just seems like there is less info on floor covering.
Because unless your installing the flooring in a method beyond manufactures specification's, the floor coverings don't out gas like OSB.

Unless your talking about the crappy laminate flooring every penny pincher buys that was made in China. That stuff is crap in every way shape and form, and should never be installed in a bus anyway.

Like installing lino in a room with a super heated floor. Then sure, it will out gas the chemicals too.

Over all, the person installing the flooring will get far more exposure to the chemicals than the person living with the floor covering after. This is due to cutting, beathing the dust, fumes, ect.

This is one more reason I like vinyl plank flooring. No out gassing, and cuts with shears, or a utility knife.

Nat
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Old 05-20-2015, 07:14 AM   #15
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Five (Toxic) Stars: Consumer Reports and Vinyl Flooring – Center for Health, Environment & Justice

This says Vinyl is toxic.

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Vinyl flooring, both sheet and composite tiles (VCT), is made with Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), also known as vinyl. PVC is the most hazardous plastic on the planet, manufactured with and releasing chlorine gas, ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride, mercury, dioxins, PCBs and other hazardous pollutants. It is nothing short of an environmental nightmare. Vinyl flooring is made with phthalates, toxic chemical additives used to make vinyl products more flexible. They do not bind to the plastic and are released into the air during the life of the product – exposing children and consumers to these unnecessary toxic chemicals.
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Old 05-20-2015, 08:50 AM   #16
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Sounds so scary. It should - it was obviously written to be. What the author of that statement didn't say is that PVC doesn't release chlorine gas unless it's burned. But many plastics will do that, not just PVC - urethane is INCREDIBLY toxic when burned. But so is pressure-treated wood - its soot and ash contain highly concentrated levels of arsenic. Burning OSB also releases formaldehyde (among other things from its glues) - and you don't always need to burn it for that to outgas.

Diesel fumes are bad for you. Paint fumes are bad for you. Most industrial sealants are super bad for you. Indoor latex paints aren't terrible - except they're made of latex. No big deal because most people don't lick their walls... but then you paint your floor with it and have a barefoot guest with a latex allergy and you're right back in trouble.

Sooner or later you have to pick your poisons.
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Old 05-20-2015, 08:53 AM   #17
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Oh I agree, I only posted that because I wanted to illustrate that there really isn't any "magic bullet".
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Old 05-20-2015, 08:56 AM   #18
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Some more on the subject-
Vinyl: A Safe Flooring Choice? - Toxic Free Kids

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As you ponder purchasing flooring for your home, it’s vital you know that vinyl flooring is made of PVC. What’s the problem with that?

As the ingredient used to give flexibility to vinyl, PVC is a dangerous chemical that causes what’s known as “gassing” in your home—which is incredibly toxic. Rolls of vinyl are more toxic than vinyl tiles, so it’s safe to say that the softer the vinyl, the more toxic it is.

There have been suggestions that if you purchase vinyl and let it “gas out” in a safe place—possibly a garage—you can let the worst of the fumes out before installation. But let’s face it: your garage—or any area you would consider safe—is still gaining exposure. Other than leaving the material outside for weeks (which isn’t good for the environment either), there is really no safe place to gas it out.

Not only is the vinyl itself toxic, but the adhesive you use to install it is going to be too. Most adhesives contain formaldehyde, which is also toxic. While we understand that not everyone can afford hardwood or ceramic tile flooring, any alternative to vinyl is a better solution.
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...ns-health.aspx

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By Dr. Mercola

You’ve probably given careful consideration to the food your children consume on a daily basis. But what about the other environmental influences they’re exposed to on a near 24/7 basis, such as the materials in their living space and, more specifically, your flooring?

It is likely no one in your home is more familiar with your floor than young children or toddlers living there, as this is where they spend a good deal of time – exploring, playing and learning the ropes of life.

As they crawl, their hands (that will later end up in their mouths) sweep across the surface, and their faces are in close proximity to the material itself, and any emissions that have accumulated in household dust.

Toxic chemicals, including some that are so dangerous to children they have been banned from toys, are widely used in popular flooring materials, and new research shows that these chemicals can be taken up by infants’ bodies as they crawl along on the floor.

Serious Risks from PVC Flooring Revealed

If your home contains soft, flexible plastic flooring, such as vinyl or those padded play-mat floors for kids (often used in day cares and kindergartens, too), there’s a good chance it is made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC). One of the main problems with PVC is that it contains phthalates, or "plasticizers," which are a group of industrial chemicals used to make plastics like PVC more flexible and resilient.

They're also one of the most pervasive endocrine disrupters so far discovered. A new study conducted by Swedish researchers found levels of certain phthalates were higher in the urine of babies that had PVC flooring on their bedroom floor.1

Researchers concluded:

“The findings indicate that the use of soft PVC as flooring material may increase the human uptake of phthalates in infants. Urinary levels of phthalate metabolites during early life are associated with the use of PVC flooring in the bedroom, body area, and the use of infant formula.

This study shows that the uptake of phthalates is not only related to oral uptake from, for example, food but also to environmental factors such as building materials. This new information should be considered when designing indoor environments, especially for children.”

This is not the first time PVC flooring has made headlines. Past research has linked it to increased levels of phthalates in household dust, which in turn is linked to chronic health conditions like allergies and asthma. One study also found that infants who lived in bedrooms with vinyl floors were twice as likely to have autism as infants with wood flooring.2
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Old 05-20-2015, 09:03 AM   #19
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Diesel fumes are bad for you. Paint fumes are bad for you. Most industrial sealants are super bad for you. Indoor latex paints aren't terrible - except they're made of latex. No big deal because most people don't lick their walls...
Makes me long for the lead paint chips...always tasty
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Old 05-20-2015, 12:14 PM   #20
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The HD flooring is pretty tough stuff but I plan on going with a tile version of a similar product. It just makes replacing/renewing wear areas so much simpler. Since my bus is so small, I am favoring the round dot Pirelli floor tiles. Expensive, but I don't need that much and the quality is top of the line. Had them in a kitchen I built out years ago and absolutely loved it. Almost indestructible. It will no doubt outlast me, but if I somehow manage to screw it up...at least the fix is a simple one. Also a lot easier to cut & fit when working with smaller pieces.
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