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Old 05-20-2015, 12:20 PM   #21
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
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I don't have time this time of year to get to the bottom of this.

I will say this. I have installed vinyl plank in more than a dozen homes. The hard vinyl plank dont stink like the rolls of lino.

Maybe I will have to install porcelain tile in my bus after all.

Nat
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Old 05-20-2015, 12:36 PM   #22
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Join Date: Mar 2010
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Year: 1997
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Porcelain may leak lead and be radioactive.
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Old 05-20-2015, 01:19 PM   #23
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
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Year: 1990
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Rated Cap: 36 passemger
Well i didnt mean to start an arguement or for wise a$$ replys. I am moving into a bus with my family and dont want to build a gas chamber. I never really checked msds sheets on anything I ever done to my house but being that we will be confined to 120sqft it made me concerned. Im trying to research it and coming up with not much so I wanted to ask people that are doing the same thing as me and might of found something that I couldnt.
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Old 05-20-2015, 01:50 PM   #24
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Rated Cap: 84
In all seriousness, vinyl plank seems to have won me over as well. Good luck.
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Old 05-20-2015, 02:19 PM   #25
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Currently in Appalachia.
Posts: 148
Why use wood in a Skoolie?

As the sayings go..
"You have to choose your battles"
"Pick your poison"
"No two skoolie conversions are alike; build it to the specifications that are important to you."

Personally for me, I am leaning towards more natural materials, most likely a lot of natural kiln-dried wood with (as yet an undecided) finish, with some sort of humidity control incorporated in the bus itself. I want a finish which will not trap moisture against the steel in a vapor wrapped sandwich- a prime environment for rust, and mold and mildew growth. A perfect example is the OEM floors in most Skoolies- steel floor/ply or OSB/rubber mats/runners-with unsealed seams of course...now hose that bus out several times and trap all that moisture (and salt from snow boots) under those mats for a decade or two... it's no wonder so many have issues with their floors. Every Skoolie who has stripped out a floor from a district that uses hoses or has regular snow/rain has seen this. The build threads are loaded with pics too. Same with the steel sandwich sides and ceilings. Vehicles without these steel sandwiches don't have near the mold buildup. Anywho, I digress...

Now I have no intention of hosing out my bus after I do the initial gut and rust check, and I am realistic enough to know that there will be spills, leaks, rain and wet feet. God willin' and the crick don't rise, there won't be any regular gushers. So with this in mind, I choose a material that will breathe and allow that minimal moisture to evaporate to the (dehumidified) interior. Is it perfect? No. Will it fit the bill of what is most important to me? I think so.

And before anyone brings it up...
I do know that integral to make this work is enough insulation and thermal breaks so that the exterior is sufficient isolated from interior temperature extremes, both hot and cold, as well as excess humidity. I am still in the research mode on this end of my decisions. The main concern for me here is all the endocrine disrupters, toxic off-gassing, toxic smoke and likelihood of flashover in a fire that is prevalent in the most efficient foams/foam boards Will I choose efficiency over toxicity? Not likely, because I have options that work for me. Likely I will choose a lower R-rating and less (or non) toxic product. this would work for me because I can just move where the weather suits my home and interior environment.

After all, it's my Skoolie, I can do what I want to! Now if anyone has any info to add that hasn't already been I would certainly consider it and add that info to my research. However! If it is not green and/or environmentally friendly, it will only be considered by me if there are no better options- for my purposes.

We don't have to agree, and we don't have to have the same opinions or visions. My opinion of what is important will, no doubt, NOT be the same as everyone else. And that is OK. No one has to do things my way unless they want to, the same way I do not have to do anything that is only right for someone else's priorities. Take away what you will and make it your own.

(And for details on the scientific studies re: double moisture/vapor barrier sandwiches, which was posted in another thread, shoot me a pm)
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Old 05-20-2015, 02:49 PM   #26
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I'm not at all worried about anything toxic because I know my Government is looking out for me and will keep me safe.

No, but seriously folks...it is most wise to check the MSDS sheets for just about everything these days. Especially if it is something you are putting inside a sealed up tin can you plan on living in/spending a lot of time in. Nothing is 100% "safe". But there is some stuff out there that is really scary once you do a little homework on it.
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Old 05-20-2015, 04:57 PM   #27
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
I'm not at all worried about anything toxic because I know my Government is looking out for me and will keep me safe.

No, but seriously folks...it is most wise to check the MSDS sheets for just about everything these days. Especially if it is something you are putting inside a sealed up tin can you plan on living in/spending a lot of time in. Nothing is 100% "safe". But there is some stuff out there that is really scary once you do a little homework on it.
There sure is!!
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Old 05-20-2015, 06:57 PM   #28
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Has everyone thrown away their teflon coated pans? It isn't right to give them away or sell them in a yard sale. Your just passing along the poison to someone else. The stuff is still being sold too in stores. I thought they were supposed to stop it by 2015. Maybe that was manufacturing. The stuff I see in stores could be what was already ordered and received for retail sale. The only thing I still hold onto is my belgin waffle iron.
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Old 05-20-2015, 07:37 PM   #29
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Location: Currently in Appalachia.
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Cast iron everythings for me! As good/better than Teflon any day. I even found a cast iron waffle maker that I can use over a campfire or on the stove top. I use it a LOT! i think it was from Coleman (try cooking cinnabons or cookie dough or brownies in it... YUM')

I also found a cast iron (enameled) tea pot too.
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Old 05-20-2015, 08:00 PM   #30
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Join Date: Dec 2014
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Engine: DT360
All my cast iron cookware rusted heavily when not used. I coated it multiple times with lard, oil, anything I could find. Heated it, cooled it. Still rusted to where I had to use steel wool each time before cooking and then use fat to bring out the rust and pour it off before I could use it. Some of these pieces were antique and some were new. All were heavy, real thing, not the cheap thin knock off. I really liked using it but too much time spent prepping it for each use.
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