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Old 11-21-2016, 06:23 PM   #1
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Tools for Torque!

So I have been wanting to take the wheels off of my bus to get a good look at the brakes and change tires and such. I have Identified my proper lifting points and have a bottle jack to lift. I also have plenty of 4"x4" scraps and jack stands that are heavy enough to safely keep the bus in the air while I work on it. However I do not have a torque wrench big enough to make sure the lugs have been tightened to proper spec. My time in the auto industry tells me every nut and bolt has a proper torque spec designed to keep everything in place and I have read that my lugs need to be in the 700bl/ft range but the tool to make sure it is at spec costs as much as a new set of tires. How do I make sure I'm keeping my bus safe as well as other drivers safe as well. If I was rich, I would have all the tools to be able to do a tire change on the side of the road by myself. Thank God I am still young enough to be able to move around a bus wheel/tire combo, I just need the tools! How are you all making sure your wheels are staying on? I hope this is not a stupid question.
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Old 11-21-2016, 06:32 PM   #2
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Great question and I'll be looking at a similar challenge in the future when I do my tires and balance the daytons.

If you weigh 200 lbs, get a 3.5 foot long bar and socket and tighten them to the point that your weight is supported by the bar. 200*3.5 = 700 lb/ft
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Old 11-21-2016, 08:54 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slidewayzm5 View Post
Great question and I'll be looking at a similar challenge in the future when I do my tires and balance the daytons.

If you weigh 200 lbs, get a 3.5 foot long bar and socket and tighten them to the point that your weight is supported by the bar. 200*3.5 = 700 lb/ft
Better to get a 4.5 foot bar so you have room for both hands or to sit at the 3.5 foot mark, LOL.
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Old 11-22-2016, 01:07 AM   #4
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700 lb/ft seems rather high to me. I was told that something between 500 and 600 is OK for stud-centered Budd steel wheels - is that right? I have a 40"-long 1"-drive breaker bar and Budd socket, so If I put my whole kerb weight of 175 lbs on the end I should get about 550 lb/ft. Mind you, I also have Good Sam ERS - those tools are just my Plan B if I can't get professional assistance.

John
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Old 11-22-2016, 08:57 AM   #5
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We changed tires daily on floor trailers hauling grain during harvest. Usually 4-5 a day and we used a 3/4 breaker bar and cheater pipe. We never had a problem and these trucks and trailer went from field t gravel and then a freeway. Just get them good and tight for now and then when you can get a good deal on the breaker etc. buy then. Maybe you can rent what you need.
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Old 11-22-2016, 02:24 PM   #6
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Go on E-bay and get a gear reduction lug nut tool kit. The kit consists
of the reduction unit, a crank handle, a set of lug nut sockets 1" drive
and an extension. The one I got is a 78 to 1 reduction so you only need
to use 15 ft lbs torque to loosen or tighten the lug nuts. My wife can
loosen and tighten the lug nuts on my bus with one hand. Cost was
under 200, the only downside is the case they have it assembled in is
real flimsy. You can also go thru and mark the lug nuts for location and
then scribe each nut to the wheel so that you are putting the wheel on
the same studs and the same nuts on the same lugs lined up with the
scribe marks so they are all back to the same torque they had been
torqued to.
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Old 11-22-2016, 04:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevydude01 View Post
I have read that my lugs need to be in the 700bl/ft range
250 on daytons, 475 on budds. 700 is way too much.

https://youtu.be/TtzAT4BYcgw
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Old 11-22-2016, 05:43 PM   #8
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700 I'm surprised they didn't either strip the threads or snap the studs off.
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Old 11-22-2016, 06:09 PM   #9
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Wow thanks for all of the responses. Ill research again for the proper torque to make sure I get it right! I have had the bus for almost a year but have never taken the wheels off for the very reason of not knowing exactly how much to torque them to so they are torqued to whatever the last person set them to the last time the wheels were off. Thanks again everyone who responded.
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Old 11-22-2016, 07:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wunderhut View Post
250 on daytons, 475 on budds. 700 is way too much.

https://youtu.be/TtzAT4BYcgw
Yes.

Here is a pdf link from accuride wheels showing the torque values for wheel nuts and studs. The only ones up in the 700+ range would be the planetary axles from a public bus? But they are 15/16" minimum stud size.
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Old 11-29-2016, 08:30 PM   #11
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I got my gear-reduction setup from cheaterwrench.com, and an old-school beam torque wrench because my clicker torque wrench only works in one direction (my buses have left-threaded studs on one side). Works great at 28 (I think) ft-lbs.

Paul
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Old 11-29-2016, 09:35 PM   #12
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My 20 year old 1/2" Milwaukee corded will remove big rig lugs. Course...back then they were actually made in Milwaukee...nowadays they all come from China, so who knows.
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