Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-04-2017, 12:40 PM   #1
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,623
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Using Redwood 2x4 for framing AC mounting

I built a Redwood fence yesterday & I have some pieces of Redwood 2 x 4's left over, I also have 2 roof mount AC units that are supposed to be delivered in a couple days & I'm wondering if there would be any issues if I used the Redwood 2x4's to frame the AC mounts??.

The wood is still kinda wet also.
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2017, 02:55 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 790
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
I built a Redwood fence yesterday & I have some pieces of Redwood 2 x 4's left over, I also have 2 roof mount AC units that are supposed to be delivered in a couple days & I'm wondering if there would be any issues if I used the Redwood 2x4's to frame the AC mounts??.

The wood is still kinda wet also.
Some years ago I made a redwood fence, and after a few months all the boards had a good 1/2" gap between them due to their drying out. I'm nervous about using any wood at all in a bus, at least for anything structural. For me, wood's only value is for decorative trim only. My current project is to frame every window with solid pine moldings, and I hope they're all kiln-dried as much as possible otherwise I may run into the same issues as my fence had.

I would try to devise a way to support the A/C units with steel or aluminum instead of wood. It would then be easier to bolt them to the roof ribs that are an open box ("top hat") section of 90,000 PSI steel every 19". I'll eventually have a small window A/C unit in the bedroom above the rear window, and it will be in a stainless steel box supported by steel or aluminum cross beams connected to the body's steel framing. No wood for me!

John
Iceni John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2017, 06:40 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 4,374
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
I would not have any issue using wood that is properly dried. Most any dimensional lumber you buy at a typical lumber yard will be kiln dried and reasonably dimensionally stable. Heck, I have even built a house out of it and it worked fine....

As far as Redwood vs other species, I don't think that there is anything that will cause issue. It has similar strength to the Hemlock or Fir that are typical 2x material. It is much more rot resistant than hem/fir.

On my last bus I made cover plates out of 1/8 aluminum to fit over the lip of the hatches and cut a 14"x14" hole for the A/C. I did not add any structural support. That worked for 6+ years and 250k miles.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2017, 07:39 PM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Picton,Ont, Can.
Posts: 1,616
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: Cat 3116
Rated Cap: 72
Redwood would probably be fine for framing. I think I'd use it inside though for your trim around each unit. Sanded, varathaned and you could even rip them into two boards for a different look, squares, rectangles whatever it takes but make joints like you are a cabinetmaker. Oh, you are,sorry, lol?
On the roof just build a solid curb to set the unit into with and build so you can attach the redwood without seeing fasteners. Shipshape!

John
__________________
Question everything!
BlackJohn is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2017, 12:41 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,623
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
I just didn't know if there are oils or anything to worry about in the wood, I kinda remember something about not burning it but according to google redwood is a lot more rot & insect resistant.
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2017, 12:32 PM   #6
Traveling
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,573
Year: 2003
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: 5.9L Cummins
Rated Cap: '00
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
I just didn't know if there are oils or anything to worry about in the wood, I kinda remember something about not burning it but according to google redwood is a lot more rot & insect resistant.
You can burn it, just don't smoke it. The dust is what is bad when sanding- don't inhale there !
Rusty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 10:24 AM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,623
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Another question, I have received both units & going over the instructions it says that the roof Cavity depth needs to be 2in min 5-1/2in max, Anyone know pros & cons (Besides head clearance) to Either, I'm thinking Unit efficiency better cooling etc etc.
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.