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Old 05-10-2016, 06:55 PM   #1
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Cool Wall Removal

Hello all,
Thanks for the help on my previous questions and requests for advise.

I would like to remove the lower wall section / chair rail section of walls from my Carpenter International Bus.

Is this possible?
Is it a good idea?
Are the four rivets per rib attached to the exterior wall or do they stop in the rib?

Attached is a link of the picture.
http://picpaste.com/utaaXB2C.jpg

Thanks,
DLJIII
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Old 05-10-2016, 07:03 PM   #2
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There have been discussions and diagrams of this before. It is structural and an extremely bad idea to remove.
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Old 05-10-2016, 07:22 PM   #3
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Sense

Ok, that makes sense.
I do plan to remove the actual seat rail itself.
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:43 PM   #4
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Depends on how it is constructed. On most Skoolies, the chair rail is a critical structural element that ties the body to the lower chassis & frame and needs to be left in place. Do some homework on your unit before getting crazy with an angle grinder and cut-off disks.
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:51 PM   #5
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Ok, I can check.
I don't like the chair rail.
It is in the way and would be much easily to insulate the wall with more access.
If it helps my Bus is a 99 3800 international, carpenter body.
I will have to slide around under it and check everything.
Thank you
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:59 PM   #6
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Actually, the area below the chair rail makes an excellent chase for electrical & even plumbing.
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Old 05-11-2016, 01:51 AM   #7
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yep, my d side had 2 -1" heater hoses and a sheet metal cover for the remote heater. using the remote heater to add extra radiator capacity for an under bus radiator. label says 90,000 btu's. might keep the dam fan from locking up and drawing hp.
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Old 05-11-2016, 02:13 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Skool View Post
Ok, I can check.
I don't like the chair rail.
It is in the way and would be much easily to insulate the wall with more access.
If it helps my Bus is a 99 3800 international, carpenter body.
I will have to slide around under it and check everything.
Thank you
I'd suggest against it, as several people have said it could be structural. It can be used to ferry wiring and plumping easily and honestly you probably will not notice it as much of it will be covered up depending on how you wish to make your skoolies interior look.

the pocket created by the lower side wall actually makes it far easier to insulate. At worst you can slit 3 small lines to create a "bendable" area and slide the board insulation in. However if you go spray foam its moot as you can just angle the spray nozzle as needed.
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Old 05-11-2016, 07:41 AM   #9
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Talking Thank You

Thanks for the advise.
The lower wall panel stays the way it is.
I will work around it.
Thanks for the help.
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Old 05-11-2016, 08:01 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Skool View Post
Thanks for the advise.
The lower wall panel stays the way it is.
I will work around it.
Thanks for the help.
I really like your enthusiasm and your positive attitude, man.
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