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Old 02-22-2015, 02:49 PM   #31
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This is my OSB. Georgia Pacific thermostat. $10 a sheet and the cheapest stuff for walls in Lowes.
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:09 PM   #32
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So now they glue tin foil to the OSB?

Funny how they do that with all the budget products.

First it was the lesser grade / cheap white rigid Styrofoam, now OSB.

Remember everyone, do what you have must to get by, I'm just voicing opinions based off experience. I'm in no way singling out any ones work or build. I only push for the advancement and evaluation of the Skoolie conversion and construction.

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Old 02-22-2015, 08:25 PM   #33
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I think its draft having a non breathable surface on wood but I suppose being mostly glue, does it matter?
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:30 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
I think its draft having a non breathable surface on wood but I suppose being mostly glue
Also help seal it to keep it from swelling up from moisture intrusion?

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Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
Does it matter?
No

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Old 02-23-2015, 12:10 PM   #35
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How do you handle condensation?

I'm thinking of lining the sides of my bus with that solid pink foam from Lowes and putting OSB on the side nearest me attached to wooden battons. The ceiling will probably have a layer of the space blanket stuff with vinyl glued over it. The floor is already plywood.
Water in wall assemblies is a topic that fascinates me, but I'm no expert! There's a lot to learn and at some point a person just has to say "here goes.. I hope I've learned enough." Here's a Building Science reference you might find interesting. It seems to me that the main idea is to use insulation, vapor barrier, and air sealing in concert to control where in the wall the dew point occurs and limit the amount of water that can be present at that point in the wall. It's also important to design so that moisture in the wall can dry to the appropriate side. I think that part gets interesting because Building Science focuses on buildings which usually have porous cladding, whereas our buildings (buses) usually have metal cladding..

At the foam-to-metal-skin interface: my thought is that it should be sealed really well (spray-on or pourable foam bonded to clean metal) or should have a gap (solid foam board with a space between it and the skin) so that condensate can bead and roll down or can dry in place, but can't get held in suspension like the water in a flattened plastic bag -- a wet plastic bag seems to NEVER dry out. The foam might never be bothered by this, but figure on the metal coating eventually failing and then that trapped water contributes to rusting out from the inside. This is the sort of thing the EIFS stucco people have to worry about, too, and they might use grooved foam or crinkled house wrap to ensure there's drainage space between the foam and building sheating. For my bus I'm thinking about foam board (cheap) spaced off the metal a bit with liquid foam (expensive) poured down to fill and seal the space.

Finally, the floor -- harder to deal with because, being flat, you don't have any gravity drainage to help you. Seems to me that you'll want to do a really good job sealing the basin where the water belongs (sink, shower pan, etc) and use moisture-resistant materials below assembled in a way that they can dry out easily. To me that usually means gaps where air wants to flow through. Think of how nasty and water-damaged every kitchen sink base cabinet is.. If the storage space were open instead of closed up with doors, that wouldn't happen.

The foil facing on that OSB is a vapor barrier. But solid closed-cell foam (the extruded polystyrene pink/blue board) is also a vapor barrier, particularly if joints are taped, so the foil might add cost but little benefit. Having the solid wood wall might be nice for the ability to hang anything anywhere, but I also think Nat makes good points about using plywood straps to save weight and increase insulation if you can confidently plan for things like cabinets that must be wall-hung. Also, if that OSB is double-faced, it's a double-edged sword: any water (or humidity) that does get into the board will have a VERY hard time getting back out. It would have to dry to an edge rather than a face, and it's a very long way to an edge from the center of the panel.
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Old 02-23-2015, 12:32 PM   #36
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Well written and great info.

I like where this thread is headed.

Nat
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Old 02-23-2015, 12:47 PM   #37
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Fortunately the OSB is single faced.

The point about water traps is well made. The hillbillies that owned the bus before me had put plywood down and then vinyl tiles. Water had got in, rotted the plywood so when I stood on the floor, it gave way. Fortunately the rubber coating was impervious and it was just the plywood that had rotted to a crumbly powder.
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Old 02-23-2015, 12:59 PM   #38
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DO YOUR RESEARCH! Stop asking questions that only the manufacturer can answer. Contact the manufacturer if you cannot find an answer to your questions on their website. You are probably going to find your answer in relation to use in a steel building (a comparison they can probably relate to better than a "school bus conversion") Start with GP's FAQ's and go from there. You may have to email them.

Quote:
Where else can I use Radiant Barrier sheathing?

You may also find that radiant barriers can expand the use of space in your home. For instance, un-insulated, unconditioned spaces such as garages, porches, and workrooms can be more comfortable with radiant barriers. Because radiant barriers help keep attics cooler, the space is more usable for storage. You can also use radiant barrier sheathing on exterior, south-facing walls that have uninterrupted sun exposure. In a wall application, the foil side of the radiant barrier sheathing must be installed with the foil facing the outside. The foil must also have minimum 3/4" airspace in front of it to be effective. This can be accomplished by using furring strips on the outside of the sheathing to create the 3/4" airspace between the sheathing’s foil face and the siding, brick or other material used on the exterior of the wall. Be sure to check with your local building codes for compliance in the installation of any siding product. You may also want to check with your siding manufacturer for the use of their siding in conjunction with radiant barrier sheathing.
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Wall Installation
In a brick wall application, Thermostat sheathing’s foil surface should face the exterior of the home (out). This gives Thermostat
sheathing the required air space between the brick and the wall.
For siding applications, Thermostat sheathing’s foil surface should face the exterior of the home (out). Use furring strips to
provide a separation between the foil face and the siding. This gives Thermostat sheathing the required air space (minimum 3/4()
between the siding and the wall.

Thermostat Radiant Barrier Sheathing is not a substitute for a house wrap as it does not work as a vapor barrier. Refer to local
building codes for specifics on house wrap requirements.
For additional installation information on Thermostat sheathing panels carrying the APA-The Engineered Wood Association grade
stamp, please see Form U450 entitled “Builder Tips Storage and Handling of APA Trademarked Panels”, or Form No. E30
entitled “APA Engineered Wood Construction Guide” (both available at Resource Library - APA – The Engineered Wood Association). For additional information
on Thermostat sheathing panels carrying the TECO-Timberco Inc. grade stamp, please see the TECO-Timberco Inc. publication
entitled “OSB Design and Application Guide” (available at TECOÂ*-Â*Certification & Testing Services for the Building Products Industry).
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Old 02-23-2015, 01:29 PM   #39
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Great info.

Mmm trust the company selling the crap, no thanks.

Best is to read what they say, and make your own judgement using common sense based off experience, not trying to make a sale.

We have many many inferior products on the market now, backed by a big bunch of words that essentially mean nothing. Nothing more than the manufacture trying to convince you there is a use for their inferior product.

Nat
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Old 02-23-2015, 01:36 PM   #40
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DAPTex comes to mind there. Runny, dribbly garbage that does not do what it says on the can and which costs ten times the purchase price and fifty times the effort to clean up the mess and damage it causes.
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