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Old 05-23-2019, 12:35 AM   #1
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What to salvage from an old travel trailer?

I have an old TT that will be junked at the end of this month. What are the most useful or valuable parts to collect before my landlord has their way with my TT?
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Old 05-23-2019, 06:30 AM   #2
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I have an old TT that will be junked at the end of this month. What are the most useful or valuable parts to collect before my landlord has their way with my TT?
Me, I'd gut it for any functional RV-specific appliances, strip out any useful 12V stuff (lights, CO/propane detector), and maybe any serviceable furniture (hide a bed, convertible table, allied cushions, etc...). Maybe windows, too.
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:23 AM   #3
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Rv fridge, stove, hood, holding tanks, rooftop ac unit, generator, charge controller, propane tanks, water boiler if you dont plan on going tankless. Windows are good too.
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:33 AM   #4
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If you have the space to store the items....and you're a creative fabricator.. IE Red Green.....

Then I would......take everything you can remove, things might not make sense or seem like they have no usefulness.....right up until you are scratching your head one day trying to solve a problem of what widget you need for something....

otherwise, as others have said, holding tanks, 12v stuff, switch panels, appliances, jacking legs(if equipped) awning, windows (depending on shape etc) etc...

one thing I would look at regardless and likely take is the hardware;
hinges, latches, hasps, lock mechs, prop arms, hardware for the convertible dinette, etc...
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:46 AM   #5
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And the bare bones frame can be used or sold too.


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Old 05-23-2019, 10:47 AM   #6
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And the bare bones frame can be used or sold too.


John
If it's a Jayco the frame is only good for firewood - if you're upwind of the fire.
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Old 05-23-2019, 12:44 PM   #7
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If it's a Jayco the frame is only good for firewood - if you're upwind of the fire.

You mean no steel frame in those trailers? How do they stand up to road travel then, Jayco I thought used to be a good mfg?



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Old 05-23-2019, 12:50 PM   #8
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You mean no steel frame in those trailers? How do they stand up to road travel then, Jayco I thought used to be a good mfg?



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Here's a video of some Jayco trailers being built: . And this was a video made by Jayco themselves!

The way they stand up to road travel is by not.
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Old 05-23-2019, 04:11 PM   #9
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Here's a video of some Jayco trailers being built: . And this was a video made by Jayco themselves!

The way they stand up to road travel is by not.
just don't bump something at 15 MPH or it's toast
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Old 05-23-2019, 04:47 PM   #10
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The steel frame I am talking about is shown in the first 30 seconds of the video. That part I would salvage from a wreck if possible.
All trailers are built similar as are rv's, sticks and staples. Not made to last for sure but helps sell new built ones.


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Old 05-23-2019, 05:41 PM   #11
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I went this similar route and bought a camper and stripped it of everything. I am slowly adding various components. there is a trove of goodies to be had. Mine was aluminum shell and I even got $80 (or so) for scrap. Burned the wood. I have a garage full of various parts, some I might not end up using but if I do.... I am set.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:13 PM   #12
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The steel frame I am talking about is shown in the first 30 seconds of the video. That part I would salvage from a wreck if possible.
All trailers are built similar as are rv's, sticks and staples. Not made to last for sure but helps sell new built ones.


John
I'm not a trailer expert but my understanding is that that frame (chassis?) is extremely weak for a road trailer chassis. They're certainly visibly much weaker than the kind of trailers used for tiny houses.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:31 PM   #13
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I'm not a trailer expert but my understanding is that that frame (chassis?) is extremely weak for a road trailer chassis. They're certainly visibly much weaker than the kind of trailers used for tiny houses.

There's a reason for that. Ever notice mobile home chassis aren't that much thicker metal (typically 1/8" thick)? The strength isn't in the frame! It's in the walls.


Look at any modern van/reefer trailer. They don't have frames at all. There's the "upper 5th wheel plate" (typically the width of the trailer, about 8-12 feet long), and the rails for the rear suspension (most slide for weight adjustment). Between them, though, is no frame at all. Just the side sills and floor support beams. The walls and roof form a tube shape which is engineered to carry the weight of the trailer and it's maximum load. Mobile homes and travel trailers are much the same.


Look under a purpose-built cargo trailer. Most have nice heavy frames, since the builder has no way to know how you'll load it or what your weight carrying needs will be.
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Old 05-24-2019, 10:44 AM   #14
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There's a reason for that. Ever notice mobile home chassis aren't that much thicker metal (typically 1/8" thick)? The strength isn't in the frame! It's in the walls.


Look at any modern van/reefer trailer. They don't have frames at all. There's the "upper 5th wheel plate" (typically the width of the trailer, about 8-12 feet long), and the rails for the rear suspension (most slide for weight adjustment). Between them, though, is no frame at all. Just the side sills and floor support beams. The walls and roof form a tube shape which is engineered to carry the weight of the trailer and it's maximum load. Mobile homes and travel trailers are much the same.


Look under a purpose-built cargo trailer. Most have nice heavy frames, since the builder has no way to know how you'll load it or what your weight carrying needs will be.
I've found it depends what you want to use the trailer frame for - I used a lightweight holiday trailer frame to build my dog trailer ( mobile kennel ) the box is built with individual compartments and is very strong - strong enough to brace the trailer frame - the lightweight frame makes towing easier and less spent on gas
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Old 05-24-2019, 12:01 PM   #15
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Sweet pooch palace!
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Old 05-24-2019, 12:14 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Brad_SwiftFur View Post
There's a reason for that. Ever notice mobile home chassis aren't that much thicker metal (typically 1/8" thick)? The strength isn't in the frame! It's in the walls.


Look at any modern van/reefer trailer. They don't have frames at all. There's the "upper 5th wheel plate" (typically the width of the trailer, about 8-12 feet long), and the rails for the rear suspension (most slide for weight adjustment). Between them, though, is no frame at all. Just the side sills and floor support beams. The walls and roof form a tube shape which is engineered to carry the weight of the trailer and it's maximum load. Mobile homes and travel trailers are much the same.


Look under a purpose-built cargo trailer. Most have nice heavy frames, since the builder has no way to know how you'll load it or what your weight carrying needs will be.
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Sweet pooch palace!

thanks - a 6`deep drawer in the back holds a lot of supplies, the `cowling on top shields dog sleds, straw bales, etc from road spray and even rain when you are traveling - adding a wider axle than was on the original frame makes the trailer ultra stable in cross winds - the trailer has 14 dog boxes and can carry up to 28 dogs by double boxing the dogs - if the weather is very cold, I double box the dogs just to keep them nice and toasty, even if I still have empty boxes, and there is a single compartment mounted over the A frame for a 90 litre cooler used for thawing frozen meat
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Old 05-24-2019, 12:46 PM   #17
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That is well designed trailer sledd, perfect for your passion, hobby, lifestyle on the race circuit.
Loved the shot with the dogs, they look like they know who is boss...


Doing the same with a 24fter which I use for now for my little snowplow tractor but handles that eight well going on and off the trailer, a few squeaks but hasn't broken yet. Not even sure how old it is but the steel and welds were in good shape still. Not enough hours in the day doing that and building a bus out.


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Old 05-24-2019, 01:08 PM   #18
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That is well designed trailer sledd, perfect for your passion, hobby, lifestyle on the race circuit.
Loved the shot with the dogs, they look like they know who is boss...


Doing the same with a 24fter which I use for now for my little snowplow tractor but handles that eight well going on and off the trailer, a few squeaks but hasn't broken yet. Not even sure how old it is but the steel and welds were in good shape still. Not enough hours in the day doing that and building a bus out.


John
never enough hours in the day, ever! - lol - somehow one foot in front of the other eventually leaves a trail of a lot of completed ( and some not yet completed ) jobs - saw a saying one time - no matter how slow you move, you`re way ahead of the couch potatoe that says you move too slow, or words to that effect - lol
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Old 05-25-2019, 12:19 AM   #19
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That Jayco video is a big factor in why I'm switching to a skoolie. Though not Jayco, my TT is still a piece of junk, built only to fall apart. I've tried making basic changes to the layout and it's nearly impossible because of how it was built. The bus doesn't have a slide-out, but it's longer and has storage underneath, which makes up for that. And it is actually built out of metal, not cardboard.
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Old 05-25-2019, 12:27 AM   #20
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I have a travel trailer parked next to my bus.

For my bus conversion I will be using exactly nothing from the trailer.

All of the fixtures are really cheap. One of the reasons I am building a skoolie is to finish it to a higher level than your typical travel trailer.

That is why we are all here.... So we can each do it the way that suits our personal wants.
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