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Old 03-05-2017, 05:03 PM   #1
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Window options...

After doing a lot of research and thinking about window options I've come up with something and I wanted to get some thoughts on it. I want my bus to be well insulated. I've checked into different insulated window options and haven't really come up with an easy replacement window. From residential and rv windows I've not liked the sizes or prices I've found. So heres my idea. I stumbled on a product used for skylights, gazebos etc. I'll share the link below. I took the one window I broke apart. It come apart easily. I discovered if I remove the glass and rubber gasket this product will glaze right in the existing window frames. It come semi clear and tinted in a few different colors and I can get a huge sheet for around $100 that should be enough to do all the windows I intend to keep. I have more than twice the windows I need so I was thinking of doubling them since I will be furring the walls out thick enough for insulation to do that. My thoughts are to install the standard glass windows first ( maybe slightly tinted) then install the modified windows over them. This way I should get added insulation and be able to open the modified windows for light and visibility when wanted. Thoughts?

LEXAN Thermoclear 48 in. x 96 in. x 1/4 in. Clear Multiwall Polycarbonate Sheet PCTW4896-6MMCL at The Home Depot - Mobile



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Old 03-07-2017, 11:06 AM   #2
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Looks like a good product. I would guess it would have a little less temperature transfer than glass. I may consider this for a few windows on my bus where I would like light transfer, but don't need to actually see out.
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Old 03-07-2017, 12:33 PM   #3
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Just bear in mind that Lexan will deteriorate over time when exposed to UV. All the windows where I work are glazed with Lexan (if that isn't oxymoronic), and some windows have become almost opaque after several years because they have so many fine cracks and crazing on their surface. Because any polycarbonate or plastic isn't as hard as glass, you can't easily clean it when the surface gets rough. Maybe it can be polished out, but I've never heard of that being done to Lexan.

Perhaps if you used the Lexan inside the glass windows it would work better?

John
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Old 03-07-2017, 01:01 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
Just bear in mind that Lexan will deteriorate over time when exposed to UV. All the windows where I work are glazed with Lexan (if that isn't oxymoronic), and some windows have become almost opaque after several years because they have so many fine cracks and crazing on their surface. Because any polycarbonate or plastic isn't as hard as glass, you can't easily clean it when the surface gets rough. Maybe it can be polished out, but I've never heard of that being done to Lexan.

Perhaps if you used the Lexan inside the glass windows it would work better?

John


That's what I was thinking. Use the existing glass on the exterior and tint it and use the lexan product on the interior so it won't be exposed to the elements and sun exposure would be cut down.


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Old 03-07-2017, 02:39 PM   #5
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menards has 4x12x5/16 twinwall lexan too for $105 or $2.19/sqft.

Sealing the ends so you end up with dead dry air space inside the panel is important for insulating purposes.
And to prevent fogging and condensation showing up inside the panel.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:09 PM   #6
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Just wondered if you pulled the trigger on this and how'd it work out?
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:18 AM   #7
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My Dad had done this on some huge used bay windows he installed in his house years ago.
He used the peel and stick foam insulation between the glass and the lexan and he just used screws with rubber washers to screw them on. He removed them in the winter to increase their lifespan. These windows were over looking the back yard and we never had curtains on them. I remember watching the birds and drinking coffee and the view remained clear for at least ten years.The tint should help with the deterioration.

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Old 08-27-2017, 08:27 AM   #8
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windows are a big insulation problem remove all you can
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoore6856 View Post
windows are a big insulation problem remove all you can
So, to take what you are saying to an extreme...

My bus (bookmobile) has almost no windows, except 1 in back wall (escape) and 2- 18" sq in side wanderlodge door. And legal driver/pass side window, Flat schnoz.

I am having a hard time adding holes to the beautifully intact spray-foamed walls for windows. I was thinking of just adding a few HD exterior cameras and a bigscreen to view scenery. Just an idea.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
So, to take what you are saying to an extreme...

My bus (bookmobile) has almost no windows, except 1 in back wall (escape) and 2- 18" sq in side wanderlodge door. And legal driver/pass side window, Flat schnoz.

I am having a hard time adding holes to the beautifully intact spray-foamed walls for windows. I was thinking of just adding a few HD exterior cameras and a bigscreen to view scenery. Just an idea.
I'd go with the cameras too. If you want the view sit outside and be social or my personal preference stay inside and be antisocial.

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