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Old 12-05-2017, 07:58 AM   #1
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Can someone please help me with the window dimensions in the 2005 Ford Corbeil E450? I cannot find the measurements anywhere. Thank you for your time and assistance. I appreciate it.

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Old 12-05-2017, 09:45 AM   #2
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Most bus windows are about 2'x2'. Those look pretty normal sized, but I'm not personally familiar with the Corbel.

That looks kind of small when you start estimating how much floor space is inside.
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Old 12-05-2017, 10:17 AM   #3
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Most bus windows are about 2'x2'. Those look pretty normal sized, but I'm not personally familiar with the Corbel.

That looks kind of small when you start estimating how much floor space is inside.
14 feet inside, Robin. 23ft nose to back.

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Old 12-05-2017, 10:50 AM   #4
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14 feet inside, Robin. 23ft nose to back.

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My TC1000 is 26' in overall length and has 21' of completely flat floor from the back door to the back of the driver's seat.

I like the look of the Corbel and it probably drives nicer than a FE.
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:20 PM   #5
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My TC1000 is 26' in overall length and has 21' of completely flat floor from the back door to the back of the driver's seat.

I like the look of the Corbel and it probably drives nicer than a FE.
Thank you, Robin. I would have liked it a little longer, yet it is a good size for me. Share your photo...I would love to see it!

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Old 12-05-2017, 12:43 PM   #6
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I have to apologise for my technical inefficiency. I haven't figured out how to load pics with my new pad. My laptop died and I'm still picking up the pieces. All my summer photos are apparently lost somewhere. I found my memory stick but it seems to be blank.

The big deal for me this summer was getting paint on this thing. Oddly other drivers are much less tolerant if your bus is not school bus yellow. Still I blend better when I'm out in the forest now.

You can see the unpainted version of my bus by clicking the build link beneath my name.
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Old 12-05-2017, 01:31 PM   #7
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I have to apologise for my technical inefficiency. I haven't figured out how to load pics with my new pad. My laptop died and I'm still picking up the pieces. All my summer photos are apparently lost somewhere. I found my memory stick but it seems to be blank.

The big deal for me this summer was getting paint on this thing. Oddly other drivers are much less tolerant if your bus is not school bus yellow. Still I blend better when I'm out in the forest now.

You can see the unpainted version of my bus by clicking the build link beneath my name.
I remember your bus! I love the color.

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Old 12-05-2017, 01:58 PM   #8
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Yeah, Rustoleum brown. They used to call it rudy brown.

Things are slowing down lately so perhaps I can figure out how to load pics again.

What is your current project on your bus?
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Old 12-05-2017, 02:14 PM   #9
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Yeah, Rustoleum brown. They used to call it rudy brown.

Things are slowing down lately so perhaps I can figure out how to load pics again.

What is your current project on your bus?
Just got it. Overwhelmed! Everyone seems to do the flooring first... your thoughts?

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Old 12-05-2017, 03:19 PM   #10
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I don't want to tell you things that don't fit your circumstances. Are you living in a house while working on the bus, or are you living in the bus while working on it?

You could tear out your floor, but at this time of year that would likely mean some cold feet for a while. I'd guess that depends on how quickly you could work on replacing the floor. I'm pretty slow working by myself.

What I like to do is make a list of the things I want to change in the bus, then prioritize. Almost everything you work on overlaps other projects you'll also need to work on, so some projects get partially done and have to wait on something else to get done first if you get things out of order.

Honestly in my opinion, the best bet at this time of year would be to work on getting mechanical issues up to snuff. I'm not sure where you live but I'm going to guess that it's cold. You can't really paint in the cold. You can perform mechanical services this time of year and that will help to make sure you don't have mechanical problems since you will be driving at times. These buses are great for picking up supplies.

If you're living in your bus one of the first things I'd do is get some styrofoam insulation panels (1/2" @ $7 per 4x8 sheets) to cut and put against the windows to help with heat loss. Curtains just don't cut it for stopping heat loss.

I originally bought my bus in October of 2015. I left the interior panels in until the next spring so I didn't have to deal with the cold through one sheet of metal. My first winter was more of a survival experience. It's not that terribly cold being in a OEM bus over the winter, but I found insulated coveralls do help a lot and make pretty good pajamas. I use a very small electric heater now, but previously I used two heaters plus propane the first winter.

All this time I thought most people removed their ceiling and wall panels first. That's an experience. It's pretty much up to you what you do first. I left my floor in because it is covered with L-track, originally to be able to secure wheelchairs. I'd like to put insulation under the floor, but I didn't want to take a chance on loosing the L-track if I got to lazy to put it back in.

Your choices should depend on your living situation. Living in a bus while converting it is relatively miserable in good weather. At this time of year, so close to the holidays and snow, I'd work on the mechanical aspects until the weather was a bit more cooperative. If you're not living in the bus I'd say go for it, do the floors, ceiling panels or whatever you want first. It's mostly just a bunch of manual labor anyway. The work gets boring, but trips to the home store wake you up. It's a long row to hoe to get one of these things done. I thought I'd be done within the first year. You should be using your bus fairly regularly in order to keep it in good working order. That's another good reason to do the mechanical issues first, to make sure you have a good dependable platform for the rest of your build. Doing the interior work only to find mechanical issues later would be depressing.

I got rid of my Impala and use my bus as a daily driver, except I don't go out daily. This bus can sit for a month and still crank right up. I've felt very lucky. I designed this bus thinking I'd be a snowbird, but here I sit waiting for snow at the end of the second year of slow progress. Yes I could drive to SoCal anyway, but I've got to many vehicles to just leave them here on the ranch while I'm down south.

Out of curiosity, where are you planning to use the bus? Around your current home or are you planning full time travel?
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