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Old 05-01-2016, 11:55 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Wondering about Windows

As someone who struggles with seasonal depression and anxiety (thanks genetics...), I love having lots and lots of windows to keep things bright and cheery. That's one of the things I love about buses - they are lined with windows on all 4 sides! However, many of you have pointed out that bus windows are not particularly well insulated, and I've seen videos where they are just dripping with condensation. This brought back memories of taking the bus to school in Utah when I was a kid. We used our fingers to draw and write all over the foggy windows.

I had been tentatively planning to keep as many of the original windows as possible, but imagining that sort of moisture dripping down my walls has me a bit concerned. RV windows seem to be pretty pricey, and I don't care for the look of them anyway. I am thinking about decorating several of my windows with some faux stained glass for aesthetic and privacy - that just doesn't seem like it would look right on a squircle. (I have a new fun word in my vocabulary!)

Has anyone tried making their own windows? I found a tutorial for diy double glazed windows, although cutting all the sashes looks like a crazy amount of work.



And then you still have to assemble, seal, and paint them...

Has anyone had any luck using reclaimed windows on a bus conversion?

Any other fabulous ideas? I'm trying to be budget conscious since I'd want LOTS of them.
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Old 05-01-2016, 01:02 PM   #2
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I also love the windows. The insulation issue is a concern during the winter but as many have indicated here you can cut rigid insulation to fit against the windows, which should also minimize condensation.

I'm currently removing the interior skin with the goal of much better insulation before next winter. I don't want to tin over my lovely tinted windows so I'll just use insulation panels against the glass during the winter which I can remove when heat isn't an issue or when I want to change or improve the view.

Part of my reason for wanting insulation is so I am able to adequately cool this bus in a hot environment.
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Old 05-01-2016, 01:35 PM   #3
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Unfortunately, cold, dreary winters are when I most need the natural light to stay sane. I don't want to block the light with a big piece of foam if I can avoid it. I am open to following the weather and wintering down south, but my parents both live up north, and I know that they are getting older... There may come a time when I need (or at least really want) to be nearby, so I'd like to be prepared in case I end up in a colder climate than I would otherwise choose.
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Old 05-01-2016, 02:09 PM   #4
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Condensation happens on the inside of the windows when there's warm moist air inside and the glass surface is colder than the dew point of the interior air. You could prevent or reduce condensation by lowering the dew point of the air (keep it colder inside), by lowering the humidity (run a dehumidifier or exhaust the warm moist indoor air for colder but drier outdoor air), or by keeping the temperature of the glass surface warmer. The latter is probably the most pleasant, but I mention the other two just in case one of them is something you're willing to consider.

I'm sure DIY wood sashes for double pane windows would look charming, but I'm sure you're right that it would be a ton of work! Probably not very durable in moving vehicle either.

You could make part-time double-pane windows by adding a layer of plastic film (shrink wrap used for product packaging) spaced off the glass a bit so that there's a captive air mass in there. A slight step up from there might be pieces of acrylic or polycarbonate sheet cut to size to do basically the same thing.

Replacement of the entire bus window unit with a single made-to-order double pane glass unit might be an option for any windows that don't have to operate.
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Old 05-01-2016, 02:43 PM   #5
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That was my opinion too, until I lived in countries where there is a perfect wet imprint of your body when you get up in the morning because of the high humidity and temperature. Much the same as making a smaller warm sleeping space during the winters, I want to make an enclosed air conditioned area to deal with humidity and heat especially at night.
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Old 05-01-2016, 03:15 PM   #6
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Dual pane windows make a HUGE difference. Both for heating and cooling. And since all skoolie windows leak unless totally sealed up with goop...they make for a very rational replacement. Add a little tint and they perform even better at keeping heat & UV's outside where they belong.
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Old 05-02-2016, 05:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Dual pane windows make a HUGE difference. Both for heating and cooling. And since all skoolie windows leak unless totally sealed up with goop...they make for a very rational replacement. Add a little tint and they perform even better at keeping heat & UV's outside where they belong.
I keep reading other folks' blogs that say that douible pane RV windows are not worth the hassle, because they will get flexed enough to break the seal somewhere. And a double pane window with a broken seal is about as good a piece of insulation as an equivalent amount of 1/4" plywood.

Has anybody here gone the double-pane RV route for a couple of years or more? Experience beats data sheets every time.
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:05 PM   #8
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in my opinion double pane RV windows installed correctly wont flex and break... I thought the mounting flanges on them were slightly flexible.. not to mention unlike House windows.. the glass sets are set in with rubber at the frames so that gives them even more ability to flex...

-Christopher
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Old 05-03-2016, 02:16 AM   #9
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I installed double pane rv windows (kinro) and they are just like single pane. Glass is just way thicker.

Of course because I want to be different like everyone else, (and they don't make 3" trim rings) I riveted the frames in from the outside. They seal fine, and I can tell the difference for thermal and noise insulation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dan-fox View Post
I keep reading other folks' blogs that say that douible pane RV windows are not worth the hassle, because they will get flexed enough to break the seal somewhere. And a double pane window with a broken seal is about as good a piece of insulation as an equivalent amount of 1/4" plywood.

Has anybody here gone the double-pane RV route for a couple of years or more? Experience beats data sheets every time.
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