Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-05-2018, 12:57 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
01ThomasMVP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 60
Year: 2001
Chassis: Thomas MVP
Engine: CAT 3126
Wood Burner Installation

Im trying to wrap my brain around the best way to install this wood burner. If anyone sees any issues I might have in the pics please let me know. My main headache now is the best, and cheapest way to install the smokestack and chimney.

I have 1 main question: The burner is made for a house and has a 6" smokestack. However, since it'll be in a school bus, I will more than likely only be making half as big a fire that it is capable of. Therefore, do you think it will be okay if I reduce the smokestack to 4"? I'm am trying to decrease the size of the hole I have to cut into the roof.

Question 2: I know that since I am going through a ceiling that has combustible material (wood) it is recommended to have a double-wall insulated chimney pipe. Does the insulated chimney pipe also require a 2" air gap? Do you think I will be able to get away with only using a single-wall stove pipe going through the ceiling with a 2" air gap?

Feel free to ask any more specific questions and give any advice and point out all the dumb mistakes I've made. Thank you for the help. 20181105_111754.jpeg20181105_111803.jpeg20181105_111809.jpeg20181105_111817.jpeg20181105_111823.jpeg20181105_111839.jpeg20181105_111844.jpeg
01ThomasMVP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 01:21 PM   #2
Skoolie
 
Pizote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 207
Year: 2007
Coachwork: ICCORP
Chassis: CE300
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 16
In a wood burning stove, you need to match the pipe size to the stove. This provides for proper draft to allow the stove to function properly. If a stove does not burn fully/efficiently, they have a tendency to smoke and create tar in the chimney, which is a fire risk.

My recommendation is to talk with a wood burning stove shop/specialist and get specific information from them.
__________________
Follow my build - and adventures at https://www.facebook.com/pizote.adventures
Pizote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 01:45 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
01ThomasMVP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 60
Year: 2001
Chassis: Thomas MVP
Engine: CAT 3126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pizote View Post
In a wood burning stove, you need to match the pipe size to the stove. This provides for proper draft to allow the stove to function properly. If a stove does not burn fully/efficiently, they have a tendency to smoke and create tar in the chimney, which is a fire risk.

My recommendation is to talk with a wood burning stove shop/specialist and get specific information from them.
Thanks for the advice. It would be nice if I had access to a pro, but I'm in a real small town and can't find anyone near me. Bought the woodburner from an antique shop.
01ThomasMVP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 02:31 PM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Picton,Ont, Can.
Posts: 1,585
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: Cat 3116
Rated Cap: 72
I don't want to sound negative as I am a huge supporter of wood stoves anywhere.

That antique shop stove is boat anchor imho. If you are going to go to all the work get a good stove and be done with it. Those are smokey and short burn times are in your future. They are cast and bolted together for the most part so leak a lot and burn the wood at a fast rate so get a huge woodpile.
Do yourself a favour and find a good airtight if you do this at all.
I agree on not decreasing the flue size ever but too big is a problem in the other direction.



My 2 cenatvos,


John
__________________
Question everything!
BlackJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 04:33 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,671
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Are you sure that isn't a coal burning stove? The small loading door on the bottom makes me think it could be. It could be dual fuel, though.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 04:40 PM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Picton,Ont, Can.
Posts: 1,585
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: Cat 3116
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Are you sure that isn't a coal burning stove? The small loading door on the bottom makes me think it could be. It could be dual fuel, though.



I thought that also but coal burning would crack that stove easily I think.
I see a door above the cleanout but imagine it is for wood instead of lifting the covers on the top.


I do remember coal stoves when I was young that looked similar but were larger and better constructed. They sure threw the heat. That has no mass to absorb much heat that it could radiate anywhere, even a small bus.



John
__________________
Question everything!
BlackJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 05:12 PM   #7
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 759
Year: 1971
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: International Loadstar 1700
Engine: 345 international V-8
My first thought was a coal burning caboose stove. Too leaky in any case, not air tight enough for good control, plus the risk of sparks coming out.
Ronnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2018, 05:53 PM   #8
Mini-Skoolie
 
01ThomasMVP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 60
Year: 2001
Chassis: Thomas MVP
Engine: CAT 3126
Thank you guys for the advice. What are some other solutions for a heat source? What do you guys use?
01ThomasMVP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2018, 07:22 AM   #9
Skoolie
 
Rogue1bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 121
Wood Burner Installation

I’d say add a damper and keep the 6” pipe, which seems easier/cheaper to source. Burn DRY wood and burn a hot fire, look at the smoke and it’s minimal there shouldn’t be much build up in the chimney. But if your worried about it get a chimney brush and brush the chimney 1-2 times per year.

Getting the hang of the sweet spot temperature and air wise on a stove takes practice and observation.
Rogue1bus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2018, 09:39 AM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Picton,Ont, Can.
Posts: 1,585
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: Cat 3116
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01ThomasMVP View Post
Thank you guys for the advice. What are some other solutions for a heat source? What do you guys use?

I use an airtight stove. This technology has been around for decades but continues to improve efficiencies.

Mine is a smaller variety with the top surface measuring 15" x25", rectangular if you will rather than a big square. That shape worked better for me in saving space as the square would have protruded into my centre aisle.
Has a 6" flue collar, solid door about 11" square, no window and gasketed.
The stove is lined on 3 sides with firebrick and on the bottom also.
All welded construction and 1/4" plate ws used for the main stove body.

It is heavy. Had to break it down to get in the bus originally.

The legs are made of 2"square steel tube and those are set on some brackets I attached to the floor that have 1-1/2" black pipe extending up into those legs.
It came with built in fan which was too noisey so had to go.

The best feature was the built in catalytic converter for cleaner combustion and burning of gases etc that would normally go up and dirty the chimney.
Takes about 20" logs.
Two draft control wheels to tune the amount of air coming in, for a hot burn or slow burn. I am one to run a stove as hot as it will safely run because I tend to it. Not out of fear but respect for that hot a fire.



Not being one to load the stove and forget about it, I don't know the burn time for a loaded stove. I always have an eye on it or an ear listening for

anything strange. You can't be too safe with fire and need to be a slave to a stove installation once you light it up.


I ran my chimney out the back end where the left upper flashing light would have been, no cutting of the roof for me for anything. The hole I made was lightly larger than the black pipe I used and was surrounded by insulation in the back wall so nothing going to burn if that is a concern.


It pays to burn the best dry hardwood you can find but from time to time I use some softwoods but never any paper or garbage. And no wood that has been finished or painted.


John
__________________
Question everything!
BlackJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.