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Old 12-02-2016, 02:20 PM   #1
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Wood ceiling? Wood sheets?

How can you put up a wood ceiling? Mine looks very plane.
Do I and must I remove the ceiling and then put insulation up?

Could I just bend up those 4x8 sheets and glue em to the metal?
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Old 12-02-2016, 02:46 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Jaybus2 View Post
How can you put up a wood ceiling? Mine looks very plane.
Do I and must I remove the ceiling and then put insulation up?

Could I just bend up those 4x8 sheets and glue em to the metal?
You can do what ever you desire. Might work, might not.
I would at least remove some of one panel to look inside and see what is in the cavity. Most likely a bunch of air and some cheapo fiberglass insulation.
And when I say cheapo, I mean stuff that is just not as substantial as house fiberglass insulation.
The cavity might also be covered in mold. Why the mold? Likely from roof leaking.
You could skip all that now, or likely wish you had made an effort to make cheap improvements with great benefits now instead of later.

You could secure some 4x8 sheets of some thin paneling via bending.
If you cut the length just right you could secure the center of the sheets and secure the ends to the wall. Letting the sheet form the arch on it's own.
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Old 12-02-2016, 03:06 PM   #3
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ok so in reality I must remove the metal and insulate it.
Do I need to put the metal back? Can I then put wood?
Those darn pop rivets,
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Old 12-02-2016, 03:37 PM   #4
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Typically, there are two types of bus insulation methods. Leaving the walls and ceiling original. Which doesn't have hardly any thermal value at all. The second is doing what I've seen called, "bare metal" removing the panels, removing the worsthless insulation and applying your own.

As far as new insulation most people score and cut rigid foam boards to fit the curve of the ceiling, attaching with glue or over layments to hold them in place. Some people glue them, others screw wood to the ribs to hold the foam in, most glue. The best results is going bare metal and spray foaming everything.

Plus it never hurts to remove the metal panels and look inside. You never know what is in there. It could be perfectly dry and with bad insulation or it could be solid mold or packed with dust or completely uninsulated. I would rather know than not and I am glad I opened my bus up.

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Old 12-02-2016, 04:00 PM   #5
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thanks but do you then put the old metal back? That is I plan on wood sheets so does the metal need to go back?
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Old 12-02-2016, 04:11 PM   #6
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Jaybus2,
In several builds, that I have looked at, after insulating they attach some furring strips, then apply the ceiling wood. If using sheets of materials it seemed like they apply ceiling in 3 sections. Large section in the center with smaller sections on either side. This reduces the stress on the wood, as well as taking pressure on the areas above the window. If using strips of wood, the furring strips are installed so that they match the lengths being used. There are builds on this forum, and some on YouTube, as well.

Let us know
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Old 12-02-2016, 04:30 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Jaybus2 View Post
thanks but do you then put the old metal back? That is I plan on wood sheets so does the metal need to go back?
You do not need to replace the original metal. And do you really want to try and reinstall several hundred screws/rivets after taking them down?
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Old 12-02-2016, 04:37 PM   #8
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You don't have to put the metal sheets back, you can if you want. It is up to you. Like above said, most people mount wood sections to the ribs and then whatever type of finished wood they want.

Personally, I cant stand the tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, walls, hardwood floors. Way too much wood for me, I am going to have three different flooring sections in my skoolie. The front section and living room will be some sort of hardwood flooring, the bath section will be tiled, the rear section bed room will be carpeted.

I have different wall and ceiling sections too. The first section will be a thin pliable wood paneling with trim over the seams on the ceiling, walls will be sheet rock. The mid section kitchen will have carved rigid foam board for finished ceiling and plastic tile back splash. The bath area will be tiled or water proofed and vented. The bed section can be anything, I want more of a metallic feel in spots, near the drivers seat will have galvanized sheet metal as a small divider and flat black accent pieces and trim. I want that industrial look as soon as you walk in. Then the normal sheet rock style home feel, followed by steady bath area, and the bed room is more private and I am less picky just utilitarian more custom cabinets and all that.

So, the sky is the limit.
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Old 12-02-2016, 04:48 PM   #9
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To answer your original question, I recommend using screws to put up your wood ceiling. If you live in a warm climate or don't intend to take your bus out when it's cold or too hot maybe you don't need insulation, but it will make your life a lot more pleasant because it will keep your bus cooler when it's hot as **** outside, it will keep your bus warmer when it's cold as balls out, and it will help keep your outside noises outside and your inside noises inside. Taking the ceiling out will also help you locate any leaks which may exist, and possibly help your health because the existing insulation is very likely disgusting.

Figure a: disgusting insulation





Quote:
Originally Posted by 1olfart View Post
Jaybus2,
In several builds, that I have looked at, after insulating they attach some furring strips, then apply the ceiling wood. If using sheets of materials it seemed like they apply ceiling in 3 sections. Large section in the center with smaller sections on either side. This reduces the stress on the wood, as well as taking pressure on the areas above the window. If using strips of wood, the furring strips are installed so that they match the lengths being used. There are builds on this forum, and some on YouTube, as well.

Let us know
Confirmed, that's exactly what I did.
figure b: too proud not to share


The big benefit of furring strips is that screwing your new ceiling into wood instead of the outer metal will prevent thermal bridging, which is no big deal in writing but is very noticeable when you feel cold drafts coming through various metals in your bus.

I enjoyed my bus without insulation for 2 years before I finally decided to get down to business. It is soo nice having a warm bus to work in during the cold winter. It was great having a metal tent that was easier to setup than a traditional tent, but it is even better having a metal tent which is as warm as your house. That said my insulation project has been about two months and counting, this could be reduced to a few weeks if I went with spray foam. The cost difference is not enough to justify all the time I've put into it. But I'm in too deep for regrets.
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Old 12-02-2016, 06:34 PM   #10
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walls will be sheet rock. Then the normal sheet rock style home feel,
Does sheet rock survive long term in a vibrating vehicle after a few thousand miles?
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