Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-13-2019, 12:48 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 4
Wood on outside of Bus

So I recently got my first bus and was thinking about muting some cedar to the outside (or something like it) and I have only found 2 photos of people who have done this to the exterior of their buses. So figured I would come here and ask if anyone has an idea how to do it, or done it before.

Photo for example only
FarmhouseMetals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:06 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 281
Coachwork: In the market
For Esthetics only or as insulation or to get that Woody look?
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:08 PM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,742
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
For Esthetics only or as insulation or to get that Woody look?
Wood is about R1 per inch, so I'm assuming aesthetics.
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:10 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 50
My worry would be that it would hold moisture against the sheet metal and invite rust. You could seal the wood in epoxy or a **** ton of lacquer. A vinyl applique might be a better solution if going for the "woody" aesthetic.
Rochey6957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:16 PM   #5
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
For Esthetics only or as insulation or to get that Woody look?
Just for looks. I own a metal sign business called Farmhouse Metals, and this is going to be my mobile store. So the touch of rustic on the outside is an idea I would love to add, but curious about making it stay to the outside.
FarmhouseMetals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:17 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rochey6957 View Post
My worry would be that it would hold moisture against the sheet metal and invite rust. You could seal the wood in epoxy or a **** ton of lacquer. A vinyl applique might be a better solution if going for the "woody" aesthetic.
Very true, I have no problem getting treated wood, staining it color I want, and sealing the heck out of it. It's good food for thought before just running off and drilling it there
FarmhouseMetals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:39 PM   #7
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Pasadena Tx
Posts: 113
Coachwork: 1991 bluebird
A metal sign business. I would think more along the lines of something like this. They also have an activator to age it. Should be listed with it.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000Z4DSVO...v_ov_lig_dp_it
jimburke77502 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:48 PM   #8
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimburke77502 View Post
A metal sign business. I would think more along the lines of something like this. They also have an activator to age it. Should be listed with it.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000Z4DSVO...v_ov_lig_dp_it
Yes I know lol I mount designs on wood, plus the marketing name of Farmhouse, want to do a certain look. Plus, it would just stand out. I DID think of doing the copper metal look too
FarmhouseMetals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 01:48 PM   #9
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 281
Coachwork: In the market
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rochey6957 View Post
My worry would be that it would hold moisture against the sheet metal and invite rust. You could seal the wood in epoxy or a **** ton of lacquer. A vinyl applique might be a better solution if going for the "woody" aesthetic.
Precisely and this is why I asked. I have a project idea in mind called Project Griswold which is a green bus with 80s faux woodgrain paneling but I've determined that a vinyl applique is the easiest way to achieve the desired appearance without inviting other issues.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 02:03 PM   #10
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 870
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rochey6957 View Post
My worry would be that it would hold moisture against the sheet metal and invite rust. You could seal the wood in epoxy or a **** ton of lacquer. A vinyl applique might be a better solution if going for the "woody" aesthetic.
Wagon Queen Family Truckster
Attached Images
File Type: png E9F7DAD1-642B-4B83-BB90-B2E1E5DB6BA2.png (1.07 MB, 28 views)
Danjo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 02:21 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 281
Coachwork: In the market
Yup, that's Project Griswold!
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 02:50 PM   #12
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 19,906
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
Wagon Queen Family Truckster
I would LOVE a family truckster!
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 03:29 PM   #13
Bus Nut
 
CHEESE_WAGON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 401
Year: None
Coachwork: None
Chassis: None
Engine: None
Rated Cap: None
Rochey beat me to it... Would definitely hold moisture against the body and cause rust / rot. One thing that might help with this is to coat the areas in question with Kool-Seal before mounting the cedar, and use corrosion-resistant screws. If you can keep rust and rot at bay, I think it would be a pretty cool look. Definitely unique.
__________________
"Cheese Wagon" <anomaly.va@gmail.com>

Former owner - 1989 Ford B700 64-pass Blue Bird (Rest In Peace, Cheese Wagon)
CHEESE_WAGON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 05:04 PM   #14
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 870
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
Knife makers use a polymer product to stabilize wood used to make handles. Itís done in a vacuum to assure complete saturation. But in this instance maybe encapsulation is adequate. After itís completely sealed then it could be glued and screwed to the surface of the bus.
Danjo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 05:34 PM   #15
Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Fresnope, CA
Posts: 154
I'd be inclined to use a wrap, just cuz it's easy and unlimited design possibilities.

https://scontent-lga3-1.cdninstagram...ninstagram.com
__________________
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away" - Phillip K. Dick
JustKip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 05:40 PM   #16
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 870
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
Use standoffs (nuts and washers) to hold the wood away from the surface.
Danjo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 07:32 PM   #17
Bus Nut
 
plfking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: N.C.
Posts: 940
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 34
I've used about 6 coats of spar varnish or spar urethane on all sides of untreated wood, with no issues (approx. 1 year on the bus, 5 years on the truck). I attached the single boards with self-tappers....on the truck, I bolted to top and bottom boards through the sheetmetal, and fastened the others together on the backside with hurricane straps.

The varnish on the truck had to be scuffed and re-applied every other year due to UV degradation.....I'm not seeing any signs of that on the urethaned bus. I had read that the new urethanes are better than varnish, and it seems to be the case.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg flush.jpg (274.3 KB, 44 views)
File Type: jpg 75 woody blazer.jpg (1.05 MB, 32 views)
__________________
Don

The Busted Flush
plfking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 08:29 PM   #18
Bus Crazy
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,742
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by plfking View Post
I've used about 6 coats of spar varnish or spar urethane on all sides of untreated wood, with no issues (approx. 1 year on the bus, 5 years on the truck). I attached the single boards with self-tappers....on the truck, I bolted to top and bottom boards through the sheetmetal, and fastened the others together on the backside with hurricane straps.

The varnish on the truck had to be scuffed and re-applied every other year due to UV degradation.....I'm not seeing any signs of that on the urethaned bus. I had read that the new urethanes are better than varnish, and it seems to be the case.
I'm not going to actually do it (because of the extra difficulty of dealing with wood and the fact that I got into this to learn metal fabrication) but your bus made me do a hard rethink. The wood really looks good on your bus.
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2019, 11:14 PM   #19
Bus Crazy
 
HazMatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: E Central Tejas
Posts: 1,997
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: IH 3800, 8 window
Engine: T444E w/ Spicer 5-speed MT
Rated Cap: I prefer broad-brims hats
Wow! I've got wood!
And I believe if I installed narrow shims between the hull and the planks, it wood negate any rust issues, as water'd run off &/or evaporate just as quickly as a non-Woody bus.
Super spar it first, natch.
__________________
Those who say that it cannot be done should not interrupt the people doing it.
HazMatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2019, 12:58 AM   #20
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,321
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HazMatt View Post
Wow! I've got wood!
And I believe if I installed narrow shims between the hull and the planks, it wood negate any rust issues, as water'd run off &/or evaporate just as quickly as a non-Woody bus.
Super spar it first, natch.

I suppose it all depends on the amount of offset between the metal and wood and the protection the gap has from debris. Our bus seems to collect tree "gunk" in th strangest of places due to water running off the roof and down the sides.
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×