View Poll Results: Wood or Metal Interior Framing?
Wood 1 16.67%
Metal 5 83.33%
Other (plastic, composite) 1 16.67%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 6. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-04-2017, 05:23 PM   #1
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Wood or Metal Interior Framing

I am curious on thoughts and other threads that discuss the pros and cons of using wood vs metal framing for interior walls and division spaces.

I am planning to use insulated double wall panels for some separation walls which will be mounted using specialty hardware, but there are various compartments and cabinets that I will need to frame out. Metal is attractive due to low weight but I wonder about stability and flexing. It also seems like it would be a bit easier to run electrical and such with metal since I would not need to drill as much.

Thanks in advance for all of the comments!
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Old 01-04-2017, 06:01 PM   #2
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What about this new PVC type wood for furring strips or frames ?
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Old 01-05-2017, 03:03 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by pepepito View Post
What about this new PVC type wood for furring strips or frames ?
Got a link?

I haven't heard anything about this, but it sounds interesting depending on the price.
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Old 01-05-2017, 03:44 PM   #4
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Got a link?

I haven't heard anything about this, but it sounds interesting depending on the price.
Dupont has these:
http://www.dupont.com/products-and-s...ng-strips.html

They look a lot like this coroplast sheets cut into strips:
Coroplast 48 in. x 96 in. x .394 in. Fluted Twinwall Plastic Sheet-42517122 - The Home Depot

For non-wood furring strips I would rather use these metal hat channels:
Gibraltar Building Products 12 ft. Galvanized Steel High-Hat Furring Channel-13194 - The Home Depot

With the hat channels, you can use them as conduits as long as you use one that your not going to be running screws into.
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Old 01-05-2017, 03:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ourmefa View Post
I am curious on thoughts and other threads that discuss the pros and cons of using wood vs metal framing for interior walls and division spaces.

I am planning to use insulated double wall panels for some separation walls which will be mounted using specialty hardware, but there are various compartments and cabinets that I will need to frame out. Metal is attractive due to low weight but I wonder about stability and flexing. It also seems like it would be a bit easier to run electrical and such with metal since I would not need to drill as much.

Thanks in advance for all of the comments!
Don't use romex wiring with metal studs unless you have some kind of bushing for the wire to go through. I used metal studs for my upper cabinets but no wiring goes through them. Metal studs definitely have their place, but they are sharp on the edges.
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Old 01-05-2017, 04:44 PM   #6
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This is what I was talking about :

PVC trim

they have another type that has some texture for decks and stuff but I have not be able to find it in the website.
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Old 01-23-2017, 10:01 AM   #7
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Either works, but I would suggest going with the devil you know. If you have good metal fab skills and resources, go metal. I have more experience framing with wood, so thats what I used.
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Old 01-23-2017, 11:01 AM   #8
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wood - but no framing is necessary.

as soon as i learned about using a Kreg jig pocket hole jig. the rest of my build was cabinet style out of 3/4" plywood.

i did frame my bed with 2x4's prior to learning about the tool. other than the bed there are no 2x4 framing for anything.

the jig helps you make strong joints and really simplifies building and saves space. if you can cut a straight line, you can build anything with it.

make a series of boxes, the closet, the bathroom, the counter, the beds, and screw everything together..... it gets incredibly stout.
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Old 01-23-2017, 11:11 AM   #9
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Ive used both. There really is no framing in my bus except for the bed. I used mostly metal, then "dolled" things up using 5/8 cedar fencing planks to cover things, or add trim. Super cheap, light, looks good, and smells even better.
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Old 01-23-2017, 11:20 AM   #10
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Wonderful feedback everyone!! Thank you!

The more I have researched, the more I have found that actual framing will not be much of an issue aside from some basic structural stuff for beds / bunks. I found one build where sandwiched foam and plywood with melamine was used as "separation panels". I really liked the clean lines and it provides the sound insulation that we are looking for.

I am finish carpenter, so I am leaning toward one of the suggestions above of pocket screwing everything using basic plywood boxes with face frames. Plywood is amazing for its weight to strength ratio and provides solid surfaces for mounting and building off of without having to think about framing intersections. Our plan is to minimize breaking up the open space of the bus if at all possible.
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Old 01-23-2017, 01:04 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post
wood - but no framing is necessary.

as soon as i learned about using a Kreg jig pocket hole jig. the rest of my build was cabinet style out of 3/4" plywood.

i did frame my bed with 2x4's prior to learning about the tool. other than the bed there are no 2x4 framing for anything.

the jig helps you make strong joints and really simplifies building and saves space. if you can cut a straight line, you can build anything with it.

make a series of boxes, the closet, the bathroom, the counter, the beds, and screw everything together..... it gets incredibly stout.
I've been building custom cabinets for years using a pocket hole jig. You are correct, they are extremely solid. Mixed with biscuit joints and glue, they become indestructible.u
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Old 01-23-2017, 01:29 PM   #12
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Nice looking cabinets! Looks like you went with a small fridge. Did you happen to look at the drawer style at all? Wondering if there are pros or cons there.
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Old 01-23-2017, 01:41 PM   #13
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No, I can't say I looked at the drawer style. I'm actually using 2 mini fridges. One, 4.7 cu.ft. under the counter top and a 2.0 cu.ft. under the table. All of the lower cabinets will be drawers not swinging doors.
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