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Old 11-25-2017, 07:58 PM   #1
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99 international raised roof

Found this on craigslist, not mine or anybody I know.
https://pennstate.craigslist.org/rvs...376595929.html

later J
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Old 11-25-2017, 08:02 PM   #2
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I swear that bus looks familiar from here..
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Old 11-25-2017, 08:09 PM   #3
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Found this on craigslist, not mine or anybody I know.
https://pennstate.craigslist.org/rvs...376595929.html

later J
Man, that transition is rough!
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Old 11-26-2017, 01:49 PM   #4
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check out the 200 gallon water tank on the ceiling for gravity flow.

water.jpg
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Old 11-26-2017, 02:48 PM   #5
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check out the 200 gallon water tank on the ceiling for gravity flow.

Attachment 17435
Cringe-o-rama!
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Old 11-26-2017, 02:49 PM   #6
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is it bad to have the water up there?
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Old 11-26-2017, 02:52 PM   #7
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is it bad to have the water up there?
yeah, this is a total hack job in every sense of the word.
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Old 11-26-2017, 03:16 PM   #8
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High mounted water tanks are a pet peave of the insurance companies in converted buses.
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Old 11-26-2017, 03:17 PM   #9
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is it bad to have the water up there?
It's fine if you don't mind a potential 1700 lb load at the highest point of your tall vehicle
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:10 PM   #10
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It's fine if you don't mind a potential 1700 lb load at the highest point of your tall vehicle

especially after a 2' 6" raise on the thing!

i just assume that maybe they dont drive with water in it.
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:14 PM   #11
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The hippies commonly put their water tanks on the roof to avoid the use of water pumps. Actually they put lots of things on the roofs making their top heavy vehicles even more top heavy. Combine that issue with inexperienced drivers and you can understand why insurance companies are concerned about their profit/cost from accidents.
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:16 PM   #12
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especially after a 2' 6" raise on the thing!

i just assume that maybe they dont drive with water in it.
I never carried more than about 20 gallons of water in RV tanks, while moving .... but there are those times
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:26 PM   #13
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I've wondered about whether if its better to elevate the tank or not so you can get better flow as compared to having it either inside the bus or even underneath it.
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:33 PM   #14
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I've wondered about whether if its better to elevate the tank or not so you can get better flow as compared to having it either inside the bus or even underneath it.
The basic rules is to keep all heavy weights as low as possible, and between the axles, if possible.

Water tanks are usually put under a bed or sofa. Often they are behind the rear axle, but that's a compromise you can live with. A water pump is used to pressurize the system.

If you plan your layout to work with this, the pipe runs are short and all on one side. So if, for example, you want a split shower/toilet across the aisle, use a composting toilet on the passenger side and the shower opposite, on the driver's side ... same side as the kitchen sink.

That way you don't need a blackwater tank and the sink and shower are both close to the grey water tank. If you want your urine diverter to empty to the grey water tank, either have it on the same side as the shower and tie in the plumbing, or prepare to run it across the bus.
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:50 PM   #15
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The basic rules is to keep all heavy weights as low as possible, and between the axles, if possible.

Water tanks are usually put under a bed or sofa. Often they are behind the rear axle, but that's a compromise you can live with. A water pump is used to pressurize the system.

If you plan your layout to work with this, the pipe runs are short and all on one side. So if, for example, you want a split shower/toilet across the aisle, use a composting toilet on the passenger side and the shower opposite, on the driver's side ... same side as the kitchen sink.

That way you don't need a blackwater tank and the sink and shower are both close to the grey water tank. If you want your urine diverter to empty to the grey water tank, either have it on the same side as the shower and tie in the plumbing, or prepare to run it across the bus.
If you follow this link, you'll see how I want to set it up. The tank will be in the back, under the bed. The bathroom is right next to it and it will have a composting toilet. Here's my question: should the tank be situated next to the wall on the driver's side to make it easier to fill it up? Or on the wall that is sharing the with the bathroom? Also how do you run the lines so it will be on the inside to keep it from freezing based on my layout? I know that nobody is using this setup, cause I found it on an Italian website. It intrigued me because based on all the layouts I've seen, they all look like nothing but one long, narrow corridor.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f13/st...tml#post235455
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Old 11-26-2017, 04:54 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by skytz View Post
If you follow this link, you'll see how I want to set it up. The tank will be in the back, under the bed. The bathroom is right next to it and it will have a composting toilet. Here's my question: should the tank be situated next to the wall on the driver's side to make it easier to fill it up? Or on the wall that is sharing the with the bathroom? Also how do you run the lines so it will be on the inside to keep it from freezing based on my layout? I know that nobody is using this setup, cause I found it on an Italian website. It intrigued me because based on all the layouts I've seen, they all look like nothing but one long, narrow corridor.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f13/st...tml#post235455
Keep the tank either central, or on the opposite side to other heavy items. There is no problem filling it. You fit an access hatch for water-fill and city water on the driver's side, and a 1 1/2" pipe runs to a fitting at the top of the tank. Usually a smaller bore pipe runs back to the same skin fitting. It's an air-vent. When water spurts out, your tank is full.
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Old 11-26-2017, 05:09 PM   #17
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Keep the tank either central, or on the opposite side to other heavy items. There is no problem filling it. You fit an access hatch for water-fill and city water on the driver's side, and a 1 1/2" pipe runs to a fitting at the top of the tank. Usually a smaller bore pipe runs back to the same skin fitting. It's an air-vent. When water spurts out, your tank is full.
Ok, thanks for the tlp. Will be awhile before I get to that point. Still trying to gut the bus. What do you think of the layout? Is it doable? One other question, I thought the kitchen and the bathroom was suppose to be on opposite sides to help balance the bus.
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