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Old 11-30-2019, 08:27 AM   #4981
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Hard to price a converted bus because who knows if anything in the build is to your liking?

I can say that bus is an OK platform for a Type A. The 6.5 isn't sought after but it's better than a gas motor. The transmission will be a variant of the 700R4 which is what GM used in nearly everything rear wheel drive at the time from pickups to corvettes. Well known and reliable for cars and trucks, maybe questionable in a bus although the low power of the 6.5 might cancel that out.

As a bare bus you'd want to spend less than 2k on it. The new injection pump is nice as that's the weakest link on the motor, almost a thousand dollars to get one rebuilt and you should be concerned that the factory unit dies around 100k miles in.
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:29 AM   #4982
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Not a bad price for a semi-finished conversion, I would try to negotiate regardless however. It's a good option for someone that wants to do minimal conversion work.
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Old 11-30-2019, 01:08 PM   #4983
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They didn't re-insulate anything other than the floor according to their ad, but than many people here choose not to re-insulate either.
Not many choose no insulation after being informed of the benefits. Those who don't, don't because they are lazy and regret it later, but tell everyone how comfortable it is is 40* weather with no heat.
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Old 11-30-2019, 09:11 PM   #4984
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To me, a converted bus without insulation needs the build torn out to insulate. I'd rather start fresh, since at least some of the interior paneling and cabinets won't be able to be re-used.
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:49 PM   #4985
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Not many choose no insulation after being informed of the benefits. Those who don't, don't because they are lazy and regret it later

I get where you are coming from. And I wouldn't disagree if you phrased it a little less pejoratively. In my opinion anyone that converts a skoolie themselves is far from lazy. Someone is not automatically lazy for choosing to leave the factory insulation in, instead of removing the ceiling and body panels and reinsulating the bus. There are many valid reasons (time constraints, mild climate, age/ability, its a 'weekender' or summer road trip bus etc) that someone might reasonably preference the time+money saved over the undisputed benefits of re-insulating. That said, re-insulating is definitely the best practice, and a sensible thing to do.



But I would imagine its not hard to stay reasonably warm in a shorter skoolie with factory insulation in the ceiling and walls and a decent heat source. Its for sure less efficient, and depending on the size of your heater probably not quite as cozy as a well insulated bus (but even a well insulated bus is only moderately insulated over maybe 50-75% of its surface area if you don't start deleting windows).


I think you are right that many people probably do regret not taking the time to strip the bus completely and re-insulate. And being a perfectionist, and someone drawn to skoolies precisely because I can strip it, design it and build it to my standards, I will most definitely be re-insulating as much as I can. But I'm also sure there are many people that haven't thought twice about their decision not to re-insulate the whole bus.


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, but tell everyone how comfortable it is is 40* weather with no heat.

Again, its all based on your perspective. If you are used to a climate controlled house that is 68-72 degrees year round, yeah a low of 40* in a poorly insulated skoolie will probably be less than fun. And no matter who you are, its a less than ideal inside temperature.. Especially if that skoolie is your home.



Personally, I grew up in a poorly insulated house with a frugal dad and no forced air heat, and these days I do a lot of backpacking in the sierras. Even backpacking, lows in the 40's aren't bad, add in the shelter and creature comforts of a skoolie, throw a couple layers on, some nice wool socks and a cozy hat, make a cup of tea, and plan on being in bed and asleep under a nice down comforter long before the temperature dips to its lowest at 4-5am, and you'll be plenty comfortable enough .



Again, it all depends on your outlook and your priorities and your wants/needs and where and how you plan to use your bus. Personally if I build a skoolie, I plan on making it as cozy and efficient as possible (without sacrificing the bright open window-heavy aesthetic that draws me to skoolies in the first place), but I don't see that as the only right way to do things.
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:55 PM   #4986
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Back on topic,


I came across two Skoolie AC systems for sale in Florida for $350 apiece



52,000 BTU each
Condition unknown


I know someone here was looking to add AC to their bus recently, can't remember who though.
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:33 PM   #4987
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Originally Posted by dzl_ View Post
I get where you are coming from. And I wouldn't disagree if you phrased it a little less pejoratively. In my opinion anyone that converts a skoolie themselves is far from lazy. Someone is not automatically lazy for choosing to leave the factory insulation in, instead of removing the ceiling and body panels and reinsulating the bus. There are many valid reasons (time constraints, mild climate, age/ability, its a 'weekender' or summer road trip bus etc) that someone might reasonably preference the time+money saved over the undisputed benefits of re-insulating. That said, re-insulating is definitely the best practice, and a sensible thing to do.



But I would imagine its not hard to stay reasonably warm in a shorter skoolie with factory insulation in the ceiling and walls and a decent heat source. Its for sure less efficient, and depending on the size of your heater probably not quite as cozy as a well insulated bus (but even a well insulated bus is only moderately insulated over maybe 50-75% of its surface area if you don't start deleting windows).


I think you are right that many people probably do regret not taking the time to strip the bus completely and re-insulate. And being a perfectionist, and someone drawn to skoolies precisely because I can strip it, design it and build it to my standards, I will most definitely be re-insulating as much as I can. But I'm also sure there are many people that haven't thought twice about their decision not to re-insulate the whole bus.





Again, its all based on your perspective. If you are used to a climate controlled house that is 68-72 degrees year round, yeah a low of 40* in a poorly insulated skoolie will probably be less than fun. And no matter who you are, its a less than ideal inside temperature.. Especially if that skoolie is your home.



Personally, I grew up in a poorly insulated house with a frugal dad and no forced air heat, and these days I do a lot of backpacking in the sierras. Even backpacking, lows in the 40's aren't bad, add in the shelter and creature comforts of a skoolie, throw a couple layers on, some nice wool socks and a cozy hat, make a cup of tea, and plan on being in bed and asleep under a nice down comforter long before the temperature dips to its lowest at 4-5am, and you'll be plenty comfortable enough .



Again, it all depends on your outlook and your priorities and your wants/needs and where and how you plan to use your bus. Personally if I build a skoolie, I plan on making it as cozy and efficient as possible (without sacrificing the bright open window-heavy aesthetic that draws me to skoolies in the first place), but I don't see that as the only right way to do things.
I grew up in an uninsulated house built in the 20's. Tin roof, old wiring, cast iron stove. We got a window ac unit in 1983 or so. Color tv came the next year.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:17 AM   #4988
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Living an uninsulated bus when it's 40 degrees outside is exactly like living inside your refrigerator.
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Old 12-01-2019, 06:05 PM   #4989
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I think that is pretty exaggerated brokedown, also think that it isn’t a matter of laziness that drives someone not to remove the factory ceiling/insulation. I am not going to act like my bus with the factory ceiling/insulation is as comfortable as a factory built RV but I will tell you the first night my wife and I spent in our bus it was 30-32 degrees outside. We have a mini split AC/Heatpump. We were comfortable and the thermometer in the bus stayed around 68 degrees. We did remove the factory walls/insulation and replaced it.
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Old 12-01-2019, 06:17 PM   #4990
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Not many choose no insulation after being informed of the benefits. Those who don't, don't because they are lazy and regret it later, but tell everyone how comfortable it is is 40* weather with no heat.
Marc I usually donít take what you say as offensive but I have to say the work I put into building my bus is far from lazy. I donít regret not replacing the ceiling and insulation on my bus. I knew of the benefits but it did not weigh heavy enough for a bus built for weekend trips or short vacations. If I was planning on living in the thing full time then sure, I might have gone through that trouble.

But as everyone knows opinions are like arseholes everyone has one.

Do what is right for you when you build your bus. If you have the time and see fit to replace the insulation then so be it. You can only fit so much insulation into the walls of the bus before you start encroaching on your space. Also keep in mind most heat or cold air will be lost through the factory windows if you so choose to leave them in. We left ours in, my wife made blackout curtains to solve this problem.
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:14 PM   #4991
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https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...6939730695198/

Beautiful 2003 All American RE in Oregon. Has all the good stuff like Cummins 8.3, understorage, etc. Also seems like he's willing to negotiate but under $5,000 is a good deal for these buses regardless. Mileage being a tad high is probably the only concern here.

Blows my mind that people pay dealers 10K plus for the same thing or crappier buses when it's a matter of patience and willingness to travel.
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:27 PM   #4992
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https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...6939730695198/

Beautiful 2003 All American RE in Oregon. Has all the good stuff like Cummins 8.3, understorage, etc. Also seems like he's willing to negotiate but under $5,000 is a good deal for these buses regardless. Mileage being a tad high is probably the only concern here.

Blows my mind that people pay dealers 10K plus for the same thing or crappier buses when it's a matter of patience and willingness to travel.
don't you love the "help me pick a bus" threads that start like- "I want to travel the country, I'm looking for a bus within 50 miles of *insert name of town in the rust belt*"
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:31 PM   #4993
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don't you love the "help me pick a bus" threads that start like- "I want to travel the country, I'm looking for a bus within 50 miles of *insert name of town in the rust belt*"
This a million times, or like that one from the other day where OP was asking about an old 8.2 Detroit for $7K
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:42 PM   #4994
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I got into a talk on facebook this morning about someone being excited to buy a gas cutaway with dents and rust streaks dripping down the back for $4500. Seems like a lot of people mentally corner themselves into thinking that a gas cutaway is a good idea, defying all logic.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:14 PM   #4995
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I got into a talk on facebook this morning about someone being excited to buy a gas cutaway with dents and rust streaks dripping down the back for $4500. Seems like a lot of people mentally corner themselves into thinking that a gas cutaway is a good idea, defying all logic.
If talking about van cutaway buses I'd prefer a gasser.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:41 PM   #4996
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If I were forced to have a cutaway it's a no brainer I'd want a 7.3. Maybe that might change if I was looking at substantially newer models but we're already deep enough into fantasy land!
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:52 PM   #4997
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If I were forced to have a cutaway it's a no brainer I'd want a 7.3. Maybe that might change if I was looking at substantially newer models but we're already deep enough into fantasy land!
Have you ever tried a 6.0 gas GM engine? They're great!
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:09 PM   #4998
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Have you ever tried a 6.0 gas GM engine? They're great!

Any idea what kind of MPGs we can expect with a 6.0 gasser?
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:13 PM   #4999
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A 2003 Chevy 2500 passenger van with 6.0 was rated at 12 vity 17 highway. A less aerodynamic and heavier bus will get less but its still not the worst fuel mileage.
They pull really well, they're smooth and very powerful. Also one of the most reliable engines out there.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:40 PM   #5000
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Any idea what kind of MPGs we can expect with a 6.0 gasser?
A friend had a 5 window shortie with the 6.0. He made a mini toyhauler out of it,carrying 2-3 dirt bikes, stuffed in through the handicap door. He averaged around 8, and his best was barely over 10. Now he has a lwb Ford Transit, built with permanent garage for the bikes. 15-18mpg, but absurdly tight living quarters.
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