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Old 05-17-2018, 11:13 AM   #1
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NJ School Bus Crash - Body Off Frame

I just wanted to share this story with everyone. A bus was involved in a major accident so severe the bus body separated from the frame. How something like this could happen is beyond me. I feel so bad for the families of the children lost and injured.
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Old 05-17-2018, 11:39 AM   #2
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Someone mentioned on this board previously that school busses are designed to seperate from the frame in a major impact. Looks like this one did exactly that. Hope that all survived and injuries were minor.
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Old 05-17-2018, 12:54 PM   #3
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look under your bus sometime... theres not much that holds the body on the chassis.. a few little hold downs here and there.. it seems pretty easy for one to come apart like this..
-Christopher
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:23 PM   #4
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I've seen the pictures of that wreck, and the bus seems to have performed as designed. The passenger compartment has separated but appears to be largely intact.

This was a huge impact that scarcely seems to have been survivable in any other type of vehicle.
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:32 PM   #5
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I've seen the pictures of that wreck, and the bus seems to have performed as designed. The passenger compartment has separated but appears to be largely intact.

This was a huge impact that scarcely seems to have been survivable in any other type of vehicle.
In any other type of vehicle that you would be required by law to be wearing seat belts in. I'm surprised there aren't more injuries to students due to not having them, But I guess the large size of the bus compared to what normally would run into it, the reduced speed the bus is usually traveling contribute to the lessening of injuries. The fact that so few died in this is a blessing. The driver was one of the survivors. One student and a chaperon perished.
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Old 05-17-2018, 05:52 PM   #6
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In any other type of vehicle that you would be required by law to be wearing seat belts in. I'm surprised there aren't more injuries to students due to not having them, But I guess the large size of the bus compared to what normally would run into it, the reduced speed the bus is usually traveling contribute to the lessening of injuries. The fact that so few died in this is a blessing. The driver was one of the survivors. One student and a chaperon perished.
There is a complete lack of understanding of why school buses don't have seatbelts.

It's not like the federal government isn't aware that they exist, and the additional cost would be trivial, so it makes sense that there must be other reasons.

There are two massive safety concerns with fitting seatbelts. The first is getting 70, different sized and shaped kids to use them correctly. The second is getting 70 kids out of them so the bus can be evacuated in an accident, and there might not be an adult around to help them.

So seatbelts are problematic even if the general public thinks it crazy not to have them.

Instead the buses rely on a number of other, designed-in features, to keep kids safe.

First is the color ... it is a major security feature.

Second is the high floor ... most vehicles submarine under a bus.

The is the interior. The seats are specially designed for strength, and deliberately padded for security. They are also close together by design and the ceilings, annoying to us now, are kept low for safety.

They have designed in passenger security cells that are almost never breached in an impact, but allow easy egress following a fire or accident.

It's just a fact that, on average, only 6 kids per year die in school bus accidents in over 2 billion journeys taken. They are just that safe.

They can never be perfectly safe, some accidents just can't be survived. But I think the Feds know what they are doing, and they do not recommend seatbelts.

The buses that do get belts are often the SPED buses. They carry students who frequently benefit from being strapped in, and they carry wheelchairs that are strapped down. They also have two adults on board and far fewer passengers.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:33 PM   #7
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There is a complete lack of understanding of why school buses don't have seatbelts.

It's not like the federal government isn't aware that they exist, and the additional cost would be trivial, so it makes sense that there must be other reasons.

There are two massive safety concerns with fitting seatbelts. The first is getting 70, different sized and shaped kids to use them correctly. The second is getting 70 kids out of them so the bus can be evacuated in an accident, and there might not be an adult around to help them.

So seatbelts are problematic even if the general public thinks it crazy not to have them.

Instead the buses rely on a number of other, designed-in features, to keep kids safe.

First is the color ... it is a major security feature.

Second is the high floor ... most vehicles submarine under a bus.

The is the interior. The seats are specially designed for strength, and deliberately padded for security. They are also close together by design and the ceilings, annoying to us now, are kept low for safety.

They have designed in passenger security cells that are almost never breached in an impact, but allow easy egress following a fire or accident.

It's just a fact that, on average, only 6 kids per year die in school bus accidents in over 2 billion journeys taken. They are just that safe.

They can never be perfectly safe, some accidents just can't be survived. But I think the Feds know what they are doing, and they do not recommend seatbelts.

The buses that do get belts are often the SPED buses. They carry students who frequently benefit from being strapped in, and they carry wheelchairs that are strapped down. They also have two adults on board and far fewer passengers.
That's what I said, just didn't want to type that much.
You certainly make it make sense.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:52 PM   #8
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There is a complete lack of understanding of why school buses don't have seatbelts.

Thank you Twigg.

I had a vague idea why they didn't. You "filled in the blanks".
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:00 PM   #9
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That's what I said, just didn't want to type that much.
You certainly make it make sense.
It's easy to attack schools for not fitting belts, and one at least on FB post I have seen that argument today. It's almost like folk forget that school buses are the most regulated vehicles on the road.

I just like to put the argument straight where I can.

While government can cause us problems, I am very proud that our Federal government has put so much thought and care into the vehicles that carry our kids.

It's one of the reasons why I also think that you should paint your bus any color but yellow, even if the law doesn't demand it. That yellow color is a very important passive safety feature, and I hate to see it watered down.
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Old 05-17-2018, 08:01 PM   #10
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Anyone that has stripped a seat down can see some safety features. Even though kinda crappy welded the metal sheet in the middle would bend and fold some to soften a blow and the thick foam wrap protects from the metal. Dont know of all are this way but the ones in mine are. The crash kinda reminds me of model A/T crashes.
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