Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2019, 01:29 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 36
Best engines for Biodiesel?

Anyone here have experiences to share on running biodiesel?

I know I should be able to use biodiesel in any diesel motor, but have a feeling that practical experience may have more opinions.

Thanks!
Kate.
__________________
Transformation is my passion...
TheatricalKate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2019, 07:06 PM   #2
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 34
I'd like to know this, too! I hadn't considered it when originally planning a skoolie, but seeing how many of the available busses are diesel engines I definitely want to know more about using biodiesel in one!
indigo_k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2019, 06:22 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 36
As we're both in Portland OR, maybe we can have a mini skoolie biodiesel meet-up!
Kate.
__________________
Transformation is my passion...
TheatricalKate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2019, 06:37 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 34
That sounds like a whole nother thread, which I would also happily subscribe to!
indigo_k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2019, 07:16 PM   #5
Site Team
 
Johnny Mullet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ashtabula, Ohio
Posts: 1,230
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International
Engine: T444E 7.3L
My bus has the T444E 7.3L engine and i ran lots of 20% biodiesel when I went out west on my cross country skoolie trip. I had no issues with it at all.
Johnny Mullet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 04:14 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 6
From what I've read...

From what I've read (and i'm far from informed on the subject--just curious enough to have done a little googling), older IDI (indirect injection) work better with Biodiesel and Waste vegetable oil. The injectors are less likely to clog up (and much cheaper to service if they do clog). They are also just much simpler robust engines, and much cheaper to maintain.



For Ford you would be looking at the 6.9L/7.3L IDI engines manufactured by International from 1983 through 1994.



I'm less familiar with Chevy/GM but I believe you would be looking at the GM 6.2L/6.5L IDI engines manufactured by Detroit Diesel from 1982 through 2000, and actually still being manufactured in smaller numbers for the U.S. military.


I can't comment on how any of these particular engines do with biodiesel, but I know as a general rule, indirect injection engines fair better and it seems these are some of the more common engines found in smaller school buses (I know nothing about larger buses, so i cant help you there).
dzl_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2019, 06:47 PM   #7
Skoolie
 
SolomonEagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Foot of the siskiyou mountains Oregon.
Posts: 193
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas / international
Chassis: International
Engine: Dt 360/ spicer 5 speed
Rated Cap: 42
Best engines for wvo and best engines for biodiesel are two different categories. From my experience and research I understand that some of the fuel lines and gasket/ seal materials can chemically react with the bio and eat them up causing leaks. With wvo/svo there are a whole different set of issues and considerations.
SolomonEagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2019, 07:30 PM   #8
Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 216
Coachwork: In the market
I can tell you that DEF engines don't tend to like biodiesel above a certain amount. I got 25% biodiesel blend once and the engine lights went haywire until I'd burned it all out of the system. Performance and fuel economy also suffered. I chalked it up to the sensitivity of electronic controlled DEF sucking technology more than the fuel itself though.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2019, 08:01 PM   #9
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Mt Vernon, WA
Posts: 195
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Bluebird, Collins
Chassis: G30 Bluebird Microbird, E350 Shuttle Bus
Engine: 1995 Chevrolet 350, 1992 Ford 460
I would only run biodiesel older idi engines (indirect injection). And biodiesel from a reputable source. Unfortunately my 1991 Isuzu 4bd1t engine is di (direct injection).
Doktari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 10:26 AM   #10
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,556
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
My 5.9 Cummins runs fine on Biodiesel.

Older vehicles may have issues with fuel lines as a previous poster mentioned.

The IDI Vs direct injection matter applies to waste vegetable oil not biodiesel.

I don't know if you plan on making your own biodiesel. If you are, I would recommend finding sources for oil before you do anything else.

I ran an Appleseed processor for a few years. As making biodiesel became popular sources of free oil became scarce. People started paying restaurants for their oil. When the places that I had been getting oil from started demanding $1 a gallon for their oil I gave up.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 10:34 AM   #11
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,556
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Interesting tidbit :

"U.S. biodiesel production hit an all-time high in 2015, its second record-breaking year in a row. EPA statistics show production of 1.813 billion gallons in 2015, up from the previous record of 1.74 billion gallons in 2014"

I
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 11:31 AM   #12
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 144
regular at the pump biodeisel ran fine in my 12V 5.9 a few years back when i was on vacation.
Mekanic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 03:06 PM   #13
Skoolie
 
SolomonEagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Foot of the siskiyou mountains Oregon.
Posts: 193
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas / international
Chassis: International
Engine: Dt 360/ spicer 5 speed
Rated Cap: 42
I put bio in my 24v and soon after it started leaking diesel at the injection pump like crazy. Can't say %100 it was the biodiesel, but that has always been the primary suspect.
SolomonEagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 05:58 PM   #14
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,556
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolomonEagle View Post
I put bio in my 24v and soon after it started leaking diesel at the injection pump like crazy. Can't say %100 it was the biodiesel, but that has always been the primary suspect.
I don't know.

I have run many hundreds of gallons of biodiesel in my 5.9 Cummings trucks.

I did also run B20 in my 8v71 with no issues. I was reluctant to run anything above B20 out of concerns about fuel lines and seals. It was a 1980 and as I understand it, older vehicles are more likely to have fuel system components that are affected by biodiesel.

Funny, on my 2004 Cummings I had to replace the injection pump about two weeks after I bought the truck. I had not had a chance to run biodiesel yet.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2019, 10:46 AM   #15
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: South Western Ontario, Canada
Posts: 15
As mentioned previously clogged injectors, rubber lines and o-rings/seals are the main concerns when running biodiesel.


Viton lines are good replacement to solve the line issues, as for clogged injectors it is due to biodiesel pretty much cleaning/treating your fuel system. The best route to move to biodiesel is a little bit at a time.. never start with full B100 biodiesel or even B20.. try to cut it so you are running B5-B10(5-10%) first. Let that slowly break down the gunk in the lines etc.. Keep an eye on the fuel filters and replace as needed.. Then slowly move up to B20.. I would not recommend anything over B20 unless your engine/fuel system was setup to run biodiesel with the proper seals/lines etc.
Injunfarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2019, 12:58 PM   #16
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,556
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Injunfarian View Post
As mentioned previously clogged injectors, rubber lines and o-rings/seals are the main concerns when running biodiesel.


Viton lines are good replacement to solve the line issues, as for clogged injectors it is due to biodiesel pretty much cleaning/treating your fuel system. The best route to move to biodiesel is a little bit at a time.. never start with full B100 biodiesel or even B20.. try to cut it so you are running B5-B10(5-10%) first. Let that slowly break down the gunk in the lines etc.. Keep an eye on the fuel filters and replace as needed.. Then slowly move up to B20.. I would not recommend anything over B20 unless your engine/fuel system was setup to run biodiesel with the proper seals/lines etc.
^^Good advice. ^^

I ran an Appleseed processor for a few years then my oil supply dried up. When I started out the local restaurants were paying to have their used oil hauled off. They were thrilled to have us take it for free. As demand for the oil grew I started having to compete with other Biodiesel producers. Eventually the bigger companies started paying restaurants for their oil. That was when I got out of it. Places that had been thrilled to have us take it for free were signing contracts with the big companies and putting locks on their waste oil containers.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2019, 03:57 PM   #17
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: 495,270,340,9,7,28,66
Posts: 93
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: TC 2000
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 65?
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
^^Good advice. ^^

I ran an Appleseed processor for a few years then my oil supply dried up. When I started out the local restaurants were paying to have their used oil hauled off. They were thrilled to have us take it for free. As demand for the oil grew I started having to compete with other Biodiesel producers. Eventually the bigger companies started paying restaurants for their oil. That was when I got out of it. Places that had been thrilled to have us take it for free were signing contracts with the big companies and putting locks on their waste oil containers.
I think I read somewhere restaurants are now leasing their oil?!?!

I have a 97 5.9 and was told I could run bio with little to no problem. Filters aren't a big deal but I'm not keen enough yet to be pulling injection pumps should I need to. Maybe if I made my own but the point of wanting to do it was to get the oil at no cost.
Stuntmanmitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×